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Thread: Timber framing tools

  1. #1
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    Default Timber framing tools

    just built my first timber framing chisel. 2 inch,D2 air hardened tool steel, differential hardened and tempered blade, 2 inch at tip RC62, tapering back to annealed RC<40 at the tang socket.

    Next is a 1.5 inch O1

    paulf.jpg

    fifty...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    PaulF

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Can't turn it around!
    PaulF

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools



  4. #4
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Nice.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    What the hell am I doing wrong?? Can't get these images to show up right!!
    PaulF

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Very cool, how did you do it?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    That's a beauty! How did you do that and not leave hammer marks? Did you sand and polish them out?

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    Very cool, how did you do it?
    Hand forged the bar stock to rough dimensions, it needed to be annealed, ie slow cooled after that, 24 hr/ 40deg / hr from 1800 deg f to room temp.

    Then, welded socket that was machined from mild steel. could have forged socket but don't have time. Used E-312-16 stainless rod with 900 deg f preheat, use temp stick!

    Anneal again 24hrs/ 40 deg/hr to room temp. Then heat 1/2 bar at end to critical (1800f) cool end with forced air cool to room temp, then temper at 500 deg F immediately to 4 hrs soak.
    Then cool to room temp.

    You could do all kinds of supper cold quenching but I say it's just a wood working tool. Crucible tool has a great data site!.

    From there its just shaping and grinding.
    PaulF

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    That's a beauty! How did you do that and not leave hammer marks? Did you sand and polish them out?
    Careful forging and then grinding/ sanding/ hand sanding/ hand polishing/ praying/ offerings to Vulcan/ holding your tunge just right/Some Whiskey taken carefully


    $hit I'm not being truthful...use lots of whiskey..as much as you can!
    Last edited by paulf; 11-07-2017 at 01:51 AM.
    PaulF

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    I guess you mean cool it in whiskey @ 40 D/H?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Veddy nize!

    Speaking of timber framing tools, I picked up a magnificent 3" slick some years ago. I have hardly had a use for it, but just having it made my shop feel more manly. : -)
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

    Next election, vote against EVERY Republican, for EVERY office, at EVERY level. Be patriotic, save the country.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    That's lovely Paul.
    Any adzes in your future? I'm guessing they'd be cast.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    That's lovely Paul.
    Any adzes in your future? I'm guessing they'd be cast.
    I have made 2 adzes, a curved blade and a straight blade. Mounted on Yew handles. I made them from 1050 spring steel as it is tough and can take a fairly keen edge, they were forged. I don't have the tooling for a steel pour.
    PaulF

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Nice work.
    Is there a reason for the socket to be cranked?
    I have slicks (cranked with,long handles) which are meant to be pushed, and chisels(straight with short handles and ferrules) which are meant to be beat on.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Dang!

    I think after timber framing, you should take up foot powered lathe turning...

    Any which way you flip it, it’s lovely work, Paul.

    Peace,
    Robert

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Nice work.
    Is there a reason for the socket to be cranked?
    I have slicks (cranked with,long handles) which are meant to be pushed, and chisels(straight with short handles and ferrules) which are meant to be beat on.
    R
    This is 2 inch wide and I made the socket that way to allow pushing as well as mallet use. The 1.5 inch one will be straight. It's not cranked as much as my slick.

    If I must, I'll tweak it straight if necessary.
    PaulF

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Dang!

    I think after timber framing, you should take up foot powered lathe turning...

    Any which way you flip it, it’s lovely work, Paul.

    Peace,
    Robert
    Hay! a spring lathe....ya that's the ticket!
    PaulF

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by paulf View Post
    Hay! a spring lathe....ya that's the ticket!
    I know a guy who might could do some beta testing for you.

    Seriously, I’m thinking I may have to cobble together a little forge (none set up , yet, at the “new” place, as we call this place, still) and start converting files into other stuff pretty soon. It’s getting cold, and that dumb lathe is fun. I aim to make MarkII, and I think I’ll forge the “head” and “tail” stock spikes on the new one, all proper old tymey style.

    I am a terrible smith, but it combines two of my passions, and things I excel at: making fire and banging on stuff. Hoot hoot.
    Of course, I am a small time dabbler, and not at all worthy of the moniker smith. I apologize to all metal workers the world over. I am, however, and absolute BEAST at drawfiling. Hehe.

    Peace,
    Barely a Wright

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    I know a guy who might could do some beta testing for you.

    Seriously, I’m thinking I may have to cobble together a little forge (none set up , yet, at the “new” place, as we call this place, still) and start converting files into other stuff pretty soon. It’s getting cold, and that dumb lathe is fun. I aim to make MarkII, and I think I’ll forge the “head” and “tail” stock spikes on the new one, all proper old tymey style.

    I am a terrible smith, but it combines two of my passions, and things I excel at: making fire and banging on stuff. Hoot hoot.
    Of course, I am a small time dabbler, and not at all worthy of the moniker smith. I apologize to all metal workers the world over. I am, however, and absolute BEAST at drawfiling. Hehe.

    Peace,
    Barely a Wright
    As they say, practice makes perfect! There are many books that will get you started on a small forge, well worth the time spent.
    It's a good Anvil that's hard to come by. Once you get one, and a fire, make all the rest.
    PaulF

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Mucho Trabajo! Muy Bueno!
    Jay

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Got any pics of your adzes? I'd love to see them...

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    You do nice work Paul, it looks great!
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    20171107_152325.jpg20171107_152438.jpg

    I'm not posting pictures here any more.
    PaulF

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Run your pics through Irfan or Photoshop etc, and it will rinse them of their metadata put into them by your phone, you can resize at the same time. Takes a bit of learning, but you can do a batch at a time, hands free, like hundreds if you want.

    Nice adzes Paul..

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    More to come soon, 1.5 " is on the way. Also a lathe tool.
    PaulF

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Nice work.

    But how about a recommendation for the books on forging? Many doesn't get me a good one.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Kat and i have been playing with a forge a bit
    i have this one and a few others




    its decent i guess, especially thorough sketches and descriptions of tools and forge accesories

    honestly when i need or want to learn a bit at depth though i go to youtube
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    thanks Paul,

    I previously had a recommendation, found the book, had it in my hands and didn't buy it.

    Foolish, especially since it was at Half Priced Books.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Go to the ABANA web site and they will point you to over 200 books from very basic to very advanced, I don't know where you are at. Tucker, Weygers and Andrews are good names to start with if you are just starting. Bealer is so-so, if you find one buy it, , they aren't that hard to find .

    Lorelei Sims Talented woman, The Backyard Blacksmith, good start as well. Her web: https://www.facebook.com/fivepointsblacksmithshop/

    Here to:

    https://www.anvilfire.com/bookrev/
    Last edited by paulf; 11-17-2017 at 10:34 PM.
    PaulF

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    If Bealer's blacksmithing book is a well written as Old Ways of Working Wood...
    This book tells you how to use the tools. Any book will tell you that you pound a froe to split wood, but this book tells you how to put pressure on the log with your foot to guide the split. Timber framing tools are in there. There is even a spring pole lathe in the back for Rob. Now if I can ever get my copy back from my daughter...

    https://www.amazon.com/Old-Ways-Work.../dp/0785807101
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Dang!

    I think after timber framing, you should take up foot powered lathe turning...

    Any which way you flip it, it’s lovely work, Paul.

    Peace,
    Robert
    If you make the lathe, you will need to forge some more tools for it:
    north house_04.jpg
    north house_03.jpg
    Pics taken 5 years ago at the North House wooden boat show in Grand Marais.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by paulf View Post
    20171107_152325.jpg20171107_152438.jpg

    I'm not posting pictures here any more.
    Keep going with the pictures - upside down I can deal with - missing would be a big loss.

    Love the ring shaped inshave.
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    If Bealer's blacksmithing book is a well written as Old Ways of Working Wood...
    This book tells you how to use the tools. Any book will tell you that you pound a froe to split wood, but this book tells you how to put pressure on the log with your foot to guide the split. Timber framing tools are in there. There is even a spring pole lathe in the back for Rob. Now if I can ever get my copy back from my daughter...

    https://www.amazon.com/Old-Ways-Work.../dp/0785807101
    I already got a lathe. I’m working on a portable version, and a taller set of stocks so I might could turn a bowl one day. I use an old bow for the spring pole.

    Peace,
    Robert

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Keep going with the pictures - upside down I can deal with - missing would be a big loss.

    Love the ring shaped inshave.
    Testing picture post (right side up hopefully)

    Got it, thru Paint. Thanks lupissonic, gota run the phone images through something to clean out attached code.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by paulf; 11-18-2017 at 12:19 PM.
    PaulF

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by paulf View Post
    Testing picture post (right side up hopefully)

    Got it, thru Paint. Thanks lupissonic, gota run the phone images through something to clean out attached code.
    The attach code is difficult to deal with. This is an inexpert opinion from a technically backward OF, so take it with a grain of salt.

    I tried to drag and drop the images in Post #31 into the reply. The image files were counted as text and exceeded the character limit, which prevented the post from uploading. I deleted them and used the insert image tool. That looked good until I uploaded the post. The post uploaded with the images where I put them and multiple attached thumbnails in a box like the one in Post #34. To remove the thumbnails, you have to edit the post, use Go Advanced and muddle through the command that I can't remember to select and delete the attached thumbnails. That got rid of the thumbnail box, but it also inserted a bad link that showed up when posted along with the images, but not in the edit mode. It had to delete the post and start over. Totally not worth the trouble except as a learning experience.

    Windows Photo Viewer is the easiest image rotating tool. It doesn't seem to do anything else, but it dies change the orientation and saves the change whether you want to or not. Whether that will prevent the forum software from spinning the pic again, I don't know.

    I already got a lathe. I’m working on a portable version, and a taller set of stocks so I might could turn a bowl one day. I use an old bow for the spring pole.

    Peace,
    Robert
    Like this?
    IMG_0586.jpg
    Last edited by MN Dave; 11-18-2017 at 11:58 PM.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

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