Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 64 of 64

Thread: Timber framing tools

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    11,283

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    [QUOTE=MN Dave;5399669]The attach code is difficult to deal with. This is an inexpert opinion from a technically backward OF, so take it with a grain of salt.

    I tried to drag and drop the images in Post #31 into the reply. The image files were counted as text and exceeded the character limit, which prevented the post from uploading. I deleted them and used the insert image tool. That looked good until I uploaded the post. The post uploaded with the images where I put them and multiple attached thumbnails in a box like the one in Post #34. To remove the thumbnails, you have to edit the post, use Go Advanced and muddle through the command that I can't remember to select and delete the attached thumbnails. That got rid of the thumbnail box, but it also inserted a bad link that showed up when posted along with the images, but not in the edit mode. It had to delete the post and start over. Totally not worth the trouble except as a learning experience.

    Windows Photo Viewer is the easiest image rotating tool. It doesn't seem to do anything else, but it dies change the orientation and saves the change whether you want to or not. Whether that will prevent the forum software from spinning the pic again, I don't know.

    I already got a lathe. I’m working on a portable version, and a taller set of stocks so I might could turn a bowl one day. I use an old bow for the spring pole.

    Peace,
    Robert[quote/]
    Like this?
    Attachment 5965
    Yar! Jess like that! Mine is built onto a “bench” in my shed, but I aim to make a knock down version.

    Peace,
    Robert

    Edited to add: There is a thread about my silly lathe...
    Last edited by amish rob; 11-21-2017 at 12:28 PM.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Mr Bauer,
    I've completed the hook and handle. Today I'll heat treat and sharpen, then epoxy the tool and handle together. Just put pine tar and linseed oil on wood handle will ship tomorrow.

    bowl hook 2.jpgbowl hook handle.jpg
    PaulF

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    17,887

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Blacksmithing is a skill, and like playing a piano, books will only point you in the general direction.
    You have to do the work, learn how the particular material responds when in a plastic state and know pretty much exactly what the finished product will look and feel like before you start. I had collected a nice forge and quite an assortment of tools, but there are a lot of mistakes to be made before you can call yourself proficient. I gave up on the forge and most of the tools associated with it including a few hundred pounds of low-sulphur coal. I kept a couple of anvils, hammers and vises and use an oxy-acetyline torch if I need to do it. Just getting a good working fire meant you were in it for an hour - minimum. And I wanted/needed a powered hammer to work steel...
    For those that love to create (art) it is a lot of fun. It checks all the boxes; fire, smoke, noise, and beauty all in one stroke! Paul's skill and work is exceptional.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    11,283

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Blacksmithing is a skill, and like playing a piano, books will only point you in the general direction.
    You have to do the work, learn how the particular material responds when in a plastic state and know pretty much exactly what the finished product will look and feel like before you start. I had collected a nice forge and quite an assortment of tools, but there are a lot of mistakes to be made before you can call yourself proficient. I gave up on the forge and most of the tools associated with it including a few hundred pounds of low-sulphur coal. I kept a couple of anvils, hammers and vises and use an oxy-acetyline torch if I need to do it. Just getting a good working fire meant you were in it for an hour - minimum. And I wanted/needed a powered hammer to work steel...
    For those that love to create (art) it is a lot of fun. It checks all the boxes; fire, smoke, noise, and beauty all in one stroke! Paul's skill and work is exceptional.
    My whole day will be ruined throwing together a small gas forge so I can make some arrowheads and a few lathe tools.
    I used to have a brake drum forge, but this one will be smaller, and gas powered.

    Hoot, hoot!

    Peace,
    Robert

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Blacksmithing is a skill, and like playing a piano, books will only point you in the general direction.
    You have to do the work, learn how the particular material responds when in a plastic state and know pretty much exactly what the finished product will look and feel like before you start. I had collected a nice forge and quite an assortment of tools, but there are a lot of mistakes to be made before you can call yourself proficient. I gave up on the forge and most of the tools associated with it including a few hundred pounds of low-sulphur coal. I kept a couple of anvils, hammers and vises and use an oxy-acetyline torch if I need to do it. Just getting a good working fire meant you were in it for an hour - minimum. And I wanted/needed a powered hammer to work steel...
    For those that love to create (art) it is a lot of fun. It checks all the boxes; fire, smoke, noise, and beauty all in one stroke! Paul's skill and work is exceptional.
    Thank you, I'm still working on it. Takes lots of doing.

    You need one of these:
    power hammer.jpg
    PaulF

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    82,402

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by paulf View Post
    You need one of these:

    doesn't everybody???
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,964

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Paulf,

    I don't know what the heck I'm looking at.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    17,887

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    I still have several anvils, my favorite is not a horn anvil but a large square anvil like L W in this image.


  9. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by upchurchmr View Post
    Paulf,

    I don't know what the heck I'm looking at.
    A 1905 Champion 60 Lb mechanical forging hammer. You can form a 1/8 round rod from a 1 inch square bar in 5 minuets with this hammer, no problem.

    It moves a lot of metal fast! The 60 Lb is the weight of the Top die and the Taupe..(connecting hardware)in pounds. I can't use a hand hammer that big 3 times a second for long!
    PaulF

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I still have several anvils, my favorite is not a horn anvil but a large square anvil like L W in this image.

    Looks like a trip hammer. L W weighs in at what??? Good steel like that will serve well! I rarely use the horn.
    PaulF

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Thanks, Paul (And Others!) for this mind-boggling thread. The WBF community continues to amaze.

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    5,318

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    doesn't everybody???


    My neighbor has a nice little modern power hammer.

    I don't get as much use of this stuff as I'd like.




    But I can go out there and make my own caulking irons when I need to.



    first make up a swage block




    for forming the head







    There had to be something boat related on this thread. lol

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    11,283

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    2084E91A-1E7F-4D24-A489-A81C64418340.jpg
    Now, where’d I set them old files?

    Peace,
    Robert

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    11,283

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    A7853600-E216-41F1-9D60-01F7CFE02CD7.jpg
    1D0439BC-98A6-44AF-A9FE-25E4254D048E.jpg
    Sorry for the drift, but I’m pleased as punch it works. I need a bigger burner, especially if I want to heat anything thickish, but these little blades are quick to heat. Watch it, they heat real quick.
    This isn’t a thing, just playing with the little “forge”. Maybe I’ll finish folding it and make a little hook knife?

    Peace,
    Robert

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    45,281

    Default Re: Timber framing tools


    British Iron works, making a ships anchor……...

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    14,910

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by paulf View Post
    Mr Bauer,
    I've completed the hook and handle. Today I'll heat treat and sharpen, then epoxy the tool and handle together. Just put pine tar and linseed oil on wood handle will ship tomorrow.

    bowl hook 2.jpgbowl hook handle.jpg
    I’m just now seeing this post! Looks a treat. (I did see your other messages). Very excited.

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    82,402

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    how do you sharpen that?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    w sac
    Posts
    4,808

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    I saw this for sale, a little north of the Bay Area, on the SFBay craigslist, just this morning. The ad calls it a sawyer's anvil.

    1924 Fisher &. Norris Sawyers Anvil - $250 (sebastopol)



    196 pounds.

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/tls...400738128.html


  19. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    17,887

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    That is nice!
    If it hasn't been tempered in a fire it is a very good deal... a serious anvil for 1$ per pound.
    (Mine is similar with a smaller platen, made in San Francisco before the earthquake, the steel top is dovetailed wedged onto it and replaceable)


    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mahan View Post
    I saw this for sale, a little north of the Bay Area, on the SFBay craigslist, just this morning. The ad calls it a sawyer's anvil.

    1924 Fisher &. Norris Sawyers Anvil - $250 (sebastopol)



    196 pounds.

    https://sfbay.craigslist.org/nby/tls...400738128.html

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    14,910

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Look what came today!

    A495187C-79E1-4D96-98AB-82C07AA92875.jpg

    Thanks, Paul!

  21. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    5,318

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by paulf View Post
    just built my first timber framing chisel. 2 inch,D2 air hardened tool steel, differential hardened and tempered blade, 2 inch at tip RC62, tapering back to annealed RC<40 at the tang socket.

    Next is a 1.5 inch O1

    Attachment 6243

    fifty...
    I want to say,.... Gorgeous work!!!! Very impressive.

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    Look what came today!

    A495187C-79E1-4D96-98AB-82C07AA92875.jpg

    Thanks, Paul!
    Glad it made it so fast! It is very close to sharp, get a extra fine, diamond, tapered hone to really get an edge on it.


    PaulF

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    how do you sharpen that?
    They are a pain..but a diamond hone that is tapered will do a good job. DMT makes some good ones in fine and extra fine grits.

    PaulF

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    11,283

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Paul, do you ever used “charged” leather? My buddy who carves (so has any number of oddly shaped blades) uses diamonds and then charged leather strips cut sort of thin, like laces.

    Also, when forming the cutting edge, is it “wedge” shaped, like a knife blade? I am about to attempt my first hook type blade like that, and I’m curious, is all.

    It IS a lovely tool.

    Peace,
    Robert

  25. #60
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    1,720

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    OK. What in (where Paul P. lives) is a sawyers anvil?
    http://www.engraverscafe.com/showthr...-my-Tansu-Work

    Best answer:


    It never ceases to amaze me what guys get really excited about..........82lbs of steel.

    FANTASTIC!!!

    Cheers
    Andrew
    Good answer with more detail in Post#8 of the link above:
    A Sawyer's anvil was designed to be used by a saw tuner, or a sawyer, to tension large circular saw blades by resting the blades on another support and spinning them around in increments so that a portion would rest on the sawyer's anvil, where he would strike it to tension each section in turn. The goal was to manually tension the blade to reduce or eliminate vibration while spinning. They also correctly tensioned and tuned hand saws of all sizes.
    Now I have to look up tensioning.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Paul, do you ever used “charged” leather? My buddy who carves (so has any number of oddly shaped blades) uses diamonds and then charged leather strips cut sort of thin, like laces.

    Also, when forming the cutting edge, is it “wedge” shaped, like a knife blade? I am about to attempt my first hook type blade like that, and I’m curious, is all.

    It IS a lovely tool.

    Peace,
    Robert
    I've used charged sewn felt wheels, leather I'm sure would strop/buff just fine. You could most likely attach thin leather to any shape hard wood for a custom edge stropping tool.
    PaulF

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sequim, Washington
    Posts
    4,868

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    I want to say,.... Gorgeous work!!!! Very impressive.
    Thanks Ned!
    PaulF

  28. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Southampton Ont. Canada
    Posts
    5,793

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Paul, do you ever used “charged” leather? My buddy who carves (so has any number of oddly shaped blades) uses diamonds and then charged leather strips cut sort of thin, like laces.

    Also, when forming the cutting edge, is it “wedge” shaped, like a knife blade? I am about to attempt my first hook type blade like that, and I’m curious, is all.

    It IS a lovely tool.

    Peace,
    Robert
    Mdf can be charged,(I use rouge,even though it's green) after using the Odd Shaped Tool To Be Sharpened to make the profile.

    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  29. #64
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    w sac
    Posts
    4,808

    Default Re: Timber framing tools

    Now I have to look up tensioning.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...light=hand+saw

    WBF member Bob Smalesr posted this tutorial on handsaws, in 2007, wherein he explains about tensioning and how to fix bent handsaws.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •