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Thread: efficiency of the sprit rig

  1. #141
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    To keep the sail shape when reefed you will almost certainly need to move the snotter lower on the mast. To make the sprit peak easy to handle you will want a peak pennant. To make it easy to get in and out of the boat without having to lace or fasten the sail to hoops you may want a brailing topping lift. However, at CWB where the boat stays overboard the sail can stay on the mast as long as it has a cover, so it can go on hoops or leave the lacing in place. Hardware to let sails be removed from hoops is available from Lowell. You can also turn lacing into toggled diagonal robands If the sail is loose footed the sail can go into a bag right up on the mast. Pieces I have done for WB and for SCM on sprit rigging cover ways to do this.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  2. #142
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    I had in mind something that would resemble a Woods Hole spritsail boat, but longer and lighter, and with a boom instead of a loose-footed sail.



    https://smallboatsmonthly.com/articl...pritsail-boat/

    My boat has the same beam as the boat above, but is a couple feet longer, somewhat lighter, and has a straighter run.

  3. #143
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    I use the brailing line with my ducker rigs; run to a bee out on the boom, distance a little less than the distance from tack to throat. But for a CWB boat where the boat will live overboard you'll not need to make it easy to pull the rig. A loose footed sail on the boom will allow it to be unbent at the clew and bundled in a bag at the tack without unlacing the sail from the mast. I'd still use a peak pennant as it will make the peak controllable and I might have a brall to the mast after unbending the clew. The reason for shifting the snotter down is that often when reefing you use the sail shape.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  4. #144
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    I use the brailing line with my ducker rigs; run to a bee out on the boom, distance a little less than the distance from tack to throat. But for a CWB boat where the boat will live overboard you'll not need to make it easy to pull the rig. A loose footed sail on the boom will allow it to be unbent at the clew and bundled in a bag at the tack without unlacing the sail from the mast. I'd still use a peak pennant as it will make the peak controllable and I might have a brall to the mast after unbending the clew. The reason for shifting the snotter down is that often when reefing you use the sail shape.
    Our Woods Hole boat uses two different thumbs for the snotter at different levels, one for the full sail and one for the reefed sail. For some reason, we can never keep a pennant on the sail. I've explained that it's not a decoration but part of the rigging, but they keep getting pulled off and not put back on.

  5. #145
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    Nov 2004
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    Scottsville, Virginia
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    385

    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Well indeed, that is a very different boat from a Melonseed, at least in terms of freeboard. Having the boat so open will make managing the rig much easier. Though with a much lighter boat and big sail, you'll need to. Will be very good for sail training. A gaff will add more weight aloft, even with the other options it may need a crew of three to hold it down in more than a light breeze. Again, good for training.


    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I had in mind something that would resemble a Woods Hole spritsail boat, but longer and lighter, and with a boom instead of a loose-footed sail.



    https://smallboatsmonthly.com/articl...pritsail-boat/

    My boat has the same beam as the boat above, but is a couple feet longer, somewhat lighter, and has a straighter run.

  6. #146
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by EyeInHand View Post
    Well indeed, that is a very different boat from a Melonseed, at least in terms of freeboard. Having the boat so open will make managing the rig much easier. Though with a much lighter boat and big sail, you'll need to. Will be very good for sail training. A gaff will add more weight aloft, even with the other options it may need a crew of three to hold it down in more than a light breeze. Again, good for training.
    I might compromise a bit and have it decked in such a way that the crew can hike more easily than on a Woods Hole boat, but I do like the long cockpit.

  7. #147
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    Our Woods Hole boat uses two different thumbs for the snotter at different levels, one for the full sail and one for the reefed sail. For some reason, we can never keep a pennant on the sail. I've explained that it's not a decoration but part of the rigging, but they keep getting pulled off and not put back on.
    Unless you have a little cleat on the sprit about a third of the way down or so, you'll need to teach the users how to tie a rolling hitch!
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  8. #148
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Unless you have a little cleat on the sprit about a third of the way down or so, you'll need to teach the users how to tie a rolling hitch!
    One of my favorite knots!

    The thumbs on the mast allow us to move the attachment for the snotter down when we reef.
    Last edited by johnw; 12-02-2017 at 01:04 PM.

  9. #149
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    Dec 2005
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    Shoreline, Washington
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    2,245

    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    Attachment 5733

    So, more like this? I didn't raise the tack very much. Don't want to lose a lot of sail area. What is your opinion on battens? I wouldn't mind having a bit of roach.
    Of the rigs you've drawn John I find this the most attractive in terms of general proportion. Regarding function I'm still on the fence, sprit vs lug. But it is refreshing to hear some more discussion of the spritsail.
    Eric

  10. #150
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hvalsoe View Post
    Of the rigs you've drawn John I find this the most attractive in terms of general proportion. Regarding function I'm still on the fence, sprit vs lug. But it is refreshing to hear some more discussion of the spritsail.
    Eric
    One reason for the boom is that I think it's easier for people to see whether they're sheeting the sail right. People just aren't used to thinking about a mainsail as sheeting like a jib, which you have to do with the loose-footed spritsail.

    Honestly, I know the gaff better, and I'm somewhat more comfortable with it, but I suspect the sprit has more potential.

  11. #151
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    Madison Wisconsin
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Another reason would be that with that sail profile and without the boom, the sheet would have to lead to a spot several feet aft of the transom. That sail absolutely has to have a boom of some sort.

  12. #152
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    Default Re: efficiency of the sprit rig

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Another reason would be that with that sail profile and without the boom, the sheet would have to lead to a spot several feet aft of the transom. That sail absolutely has to have a boom of some sort.
    Of course, I would design a boomless sail differently. The Woods Hole boats developed high-aspect rigs because of the problem you describe.

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