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Thread: New England example of Searunner 25 trimaran ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Salem, MA
    Posts
    138

    Default New England example of Searunner 25 trimaran ?

    Hello all,

    I'd like to be able to try on a Jim Brown designed Searunner 25 for size - to actually experience the physical size and interior volumes of the boat.

    Like being comfortable in any good suit of clothes, it's all in the fit

    If you have or know of one anywhere in the Northeast (USA), I'd greatly appreciate hearing about it.

    Thanks in advance for any help provided,
    Tom

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    cincinnati, ohio, USA
    Posts
    208

    Default Re: New England example of Searunner 25 trimaran ?

    I built a Searunner 37 back in the early 1970's and have looked at a few Searunner 25s over the years. As with almost any 25' trimaran (at least the ones that sail well) the interior is tight. Jim Brown did make a good usable well thought out interior within the dimensions available but don't expect palatial accommodations. You will find the interior cross section to be a "T" shape with your arms able to reach out to the sides of the cabin. The top of the hull will be about 3-1/2' feet wide in the cabin area narrowing in the bunk areas. The Searunner 25 is, as all of Browns designs, a well thought out design for it's intended parameters based on decades of experience.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,711

    Default Re: New England example of Searunner 25 trimaran ?

    I owned a Searunner 25 for about 8 years back in the '90s. It was a fantastic boat, but I would not recommend anyone to build one today. The design was ahead of the curve when Jim drew it, but so much more has been figured out and refined since then it just doesn't make sense to go that route today. It is a very complex structure for a 25' boat. Lots and lots of pieces to cut and fit together. It sails and handles extremely well, but it's no where near as fast as the current crop of small trimarans. And you can (and I did) trailer it all over the place, again there are better folding designs today.

    As to accomodations: there are two versions of the boat, the blue water and the coastal cruiser. I bought a blue water and converted into the coastal cruiser. As such, you live in the cockpit. The small cabin forward is a head and some storage. The small cabin aft is a small galley and a single berth. But there are lockers everywhere providing endless places to misplace stuff. The blue water version sacrifices cockpit space to expand the forward cabin a bit.

    If I wanted such a boat today, I'd be looking at this design: Marples' DC-3

    -Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: New England example of Searunner 25 trimaran ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    I owned a Searunner 25 for about 8 years back in the '90s. It was a fantastic boat, but I would not recommend anyone to build one today. The design was ahead of the curve when Jim drew it, but so much more has been figured out and refined since then it just doesn't make sense to go that route today. It is a very complex structure for a 25' boat. Lots and lots of pieces to cut and fit together. It sails and handles extremely well, but it's no where near as fast as the current crop of small trimarans. And you can (and I did) trailer it all over the place, again there are better folding designs today.

    As to accomodations: there are two versions of the boat, the blue water and the coastal cruiser. I bought a blue water and converted into the coastal cruiser. As such, you live in the cockpit. The small cabin forward is a head and some storage. The small cabin aft is a small galley and a single berth. But there are lockers everywhere providing endless places to misplace stuff. The blue water version sacrifices cockpit space to expand the forward cabin a bit.

    If I wanted such a boat today, I'd be looking at this design: Marples' DC-3

    I couldn't agree more. The DC 3 is badass. With the swing-wing folding it could be easy at the launch ramp too.

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