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Thread: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Will a standard twist drill bit track straight? I've always heard barefoot is the way to go and calling the threaded one a "ship auger" just tends to lead people astray (Pun intended)
    PS, the screw foot is called a ship auger, the non screw foot one is called a barefoot auger.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Here is what you need. They are not just regular augers with the screw cut off.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    What he said.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    First time I've seen this thread or heard of the DD. Very cool boats. What's the controversy?

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Episode 24 is now on YouTube. We glue the transom knee into place and begin shaping the rabbet. Dare I say that the next episode we'll have frames on the keel?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLCuMLuQQpE
    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
    http://www.youtube.com/c/SixPointsWoodWorks

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    Here is what you need. They are not just regular augers with the screw cut off.
    If you have no where to store those properly I'll undertake to look after them for you.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  7. #42
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    in you latest video the question on how to cut you rabbit was raised. Mabey this would help in some way.

    https://www.amazon.com/King-Arthurs-.../dp/B0000224SJ

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    If you have no where to store those properly I'll undertake to look after them for you.
    ........ Well,..... actually Nick, I might just be keeping them somewhere near these, which were given to me ten days ago.

    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    ^ Now you are just showing off.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  10. #45
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    If you have no where to store those properly I'll undertake to look after them for you.
    I watched the whole video and only saw about 1 minute of hammer and chisel for the bearding line!!! I think you need about 10 more people on that project lol

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    ^ Now you are just showing off.

    Mmmmmmmm,................. maybe.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Just saw this thread for the first time. Love the duck concept. Not a big fan of many power boats, but pretty hard not to be inspired by the ducks.

    Earlier in this thread are comments about round boats not being harder to build... I can only guess that as the years go by builders forget the details of their projects... or maybe it is just me... but my experience is that building round is a hark-load more work during lofting, during shaping the keel timber, during planking, during fairing, and every single part of the interior has to be fitted in a round hull even though the cabinetry is normally full of straight lines. If the builder wants to get the project done in a timely manner there is something to be said for a chine boat.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Lofting is lofting and once one breaks free from the tyranny of the straight line there's not that much difference when lofting larger boats. And if you're building plank on frame - carvel or lapstrake - then the build is not really so different either. For larger boats. Like what a couple or family might go cruising aboard.

    But the hard chined boat can be designed to take advantage of panels with simple or even no curves, making way for plywood or metal construction which can be quite rapid.

    In a manner of speaking.

    Looking at a boat you could comfortably cruise a couple or a family aboard, you must remember that the hull is only about 1/4 the cost of the boat and it works out to only about 1/4 the work also. The accomodation is often more work to install and finish out and having a straight but never plumb line for the outboard edge of any bulkheads does not really save much time. And then you must install the mechanicals, rigging, the tasks are endless.

    You might save 30% labor on the hull if you build a hard chined boat - maybe. That's a whopping 7-1/2% off the whole effort.

    There are boats that are very hard to build. Many catboats are hard to plank, especially at the waterline area of the bow. Bolger designed some nice units that are about like the Beetle Cat but 1/3 the weight and easily built with plywood. But some round bottom boats are easily planked. L Francis Herreshoff made the Golden Ball's planking very easy to line out and make. It's all in engineering for the material. For example, a fully developed steel or aluminum hull often requires sophisticated bending plates on two axies. Such complexities lead people away from round bottom metal boats. But John Alden designed the magnificent 57' steel ketch Minot's Light with all the plates part of conic sections so that each plate was bent on only one axis. Navel architects can be pretty slick that way.

    The savings of building in hard chine are real, especially in materials. But the biggest advantage is that people feel they can do it, nothing special or strange. Building in the round does require a learning curve that frightens many. Buehler's genius is that he designed seaworthy, seakindly, efficient, and pretty boats that people actually build, not just dream about.

    G'luck

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Ian, I don't think it is just the hull, but anything which has to later conform to the hull shape (I.e. The interior). When I built my sharpie (admittedly a tiny whee thing) it was possible to transfer shapes just knowing length and angle of lines. Now I am fitting the interior to my round boat the only way is to spile shapes for pretty much every piece of every cabinet, shelf, or whatever. Not hard, but relatively time consuming... Oh... and btw, did I mention the round lump of lead bolted to the keel complete with undercut on the top surface (ok not every round boat has a round lump of ballast I agree). I concede that it may just be my methods leaving me with the impression that chine boats are less work to build. Certainly Wizbang would totally disagree with me, but you know that bloke is some kind of super-human when it comes to boat building. If Buehler was still around he'd say chine is easier (I think, maybe that is presumptuous of me).

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    I don't have anything to compare to of course but Ian is right about mindset. As I am building this duck much of seems very similar to framing a complex roof on a house, angles, angles, angles. My experience is remodeling my own homes and building furniture as a hobby. Angles are tough, but doable. Angles and curves very challenging for me. When I read, see pictures or watch videos of people building these beautiful rounded boats it does not inspire confidence in me that I could do it well. Doing it well is the key. I'm sure I could do it, eventually figure things out, but I don't think I could get the finish I am after.

    I'm not sure if it was Georges writing style, salesmanship or my own misconceptions about other types of boats, but the Duck made sense to me. I could see how it went together, one system on top of another. It was never about cost or what type was cheaper to build. For me it was all about something that would not remain a drawing on the wall, but something I could actually build. More importantly, I believed, still believe, that I can not only build it, but get the quality of finish my wife and I are looking for.
    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
    http://www.youtube.com/c/SixPointsWoodWorks

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Quote Originally Posted by scott2640 View Post

    I'm not sure if it was Georges writing style, salesmanship or my own misconceptions about other types of boats, but the Duck made sense to me. I could see how it went together, one system on top of another. It was never about cost or what type was cheaper to build. For me it was all about something that would not remain a drawing on the wall, but something I could actually build. More importantly, I believed, still believe, that I can not only build it, but get the quality of finish my wife and I are looking for.
    I think thats why many have gone down the chine road. Its not that curves are impossible, just that straight lines are much easier for some people to deal with. The extra wetted surface and chine drag that many talk about about to make it sound completely inferior to a round hull section do base their point on well known data, just that in some cases, its not quite as bad as some believe. Im going as far as making a round bilge test model to compare to my chine model, mostly for kicks, but also to find out if the benefit of reduced drag will actually be worthwhile involving another method like a strip planked chine.....im not even sure it will be measurable on a model scale, but they can tow against each other on a balanced arm.
    My old waterwitch had a chine planked wide enough to have quite a healthy radius on it. No one has actually told me how tight a radius has to be to be detrimental, or how big to not be an issue. I would not hesitate to build a Captain Eddie for use on the lake here.
    More power to your elbow, thats a lot of wood going in there! Oh, and there is an Olga being built down the road......

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Still one of my favorite builds Scott! Keep at it!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    With the passing of George Beuhler we are even more motivated to build a Duck he would be proud of. Work continues on as time allows. After marking our bearding and rabbet lines we made some cuts with the circular saw just shy of the finished depth. I think we'll use a combination of a multi-tool, turbo plane on the angle grinder and a chisel to hog out the remaining material.

    We drilled some more big holes and installed the first of our homemade, galvanized 5/8" bolts that support the transom knee. We coated the hole with preservative and then used some cotton caulking and tar to try to keep the water out. As one of our followers on Facebook stated, "pretty salty stuff"

    As soon as we get some warmer temperatures we'll epoxy and bolt the transom in place and then move on to laying out floors, drilling keel bolts and installing frames. We got started with dry fitting station 38 just to see how things look. I was pleasantly surprised to see how well things fit and lined up, fingers crossed going forward.







    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
    http://www.youtube.com/c/SixPointsWoodWorks

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Quote Originally Posted by scott2640 View Post
    homemade, galvanized 5/8" bolts
    Hi Scott, Is there a place around you that does Galvanizing ?
    Cheers,
    Mark

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    There is a place in Buffalo NY, which is about an hour away, but they did not have the centrifuge required to spin the bolts to clear the threads of the galvanizing material. They referred me to a place in Cleveland and I shipped it to them. They did a nice job.

    Cleveland galvanizer:
    http://www.artgalvanizing.com/

    Buffalo galvanizer:
    http://www.frontiergalvanizing.com/
    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
    http://www.youtube.com/c/SixPointsWoodWorks

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Building a 41' Diesel Duck: Sea Dreamer Project

    Nice work, I've watched some of your videos.

    Are you going to bevel the bottoms of the floor timbers?

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