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Thread: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Central Vermont
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    Default Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    Hello again -

    I am looking for feedback from folks who have used Epifanes Monourethane Paint.

    I have a couple of cans of this paint for the topsides and also a couple of cans for the canvas on the deck of my new Lightning. My topsides are WR Cedar edge glued as well as glued to the frames. The deck will be 6mm 1088 Okoume ply, glued to the deck beams. I have a barrier coat of West Epoxy on the outside but not on the inside. This is the way Nickels and Holman built their Lightnings in the 1960s, and I am familiar with some N & H classic Lightnings that are almost 60 years old and still going strong.

    Anyway, I was concerned that the inevitable expansion/shrinking of the planks would suggest that I should use their Yacht Enamel, which is a traditional oil enamel. But, for my boat, the recommendation from Epifanes was to use monourethane, because it would have higher gloss and would not have to be redone nearly as often.

    The plan is to roll and tip the paint with a foam roller and an Epifanes brush. I probably won't be painting for another month or so, so the temps should be around 70 degrees up here in Vermont.

    I am looking for anyone who has used this paint for feedback on how it turned out. Artisan Boatworks has a video where they say lots of good things about rolling and tipping Epifanes products, but it would be nice to see if everyone agrees with them.

    I am also looking for the secrets to doing a good job on my first go-'round painting the topsides.

    Thanks in advance,

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Seibert; 03-21-2018 at 01:46 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Down South
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    163

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    I haven’t used the mono-. I have used the two-part paint and have been pleased.

    A primer is needed for both when applying over epoxy, I believe. I did call Epifanes directly at one point and they were very helpful.

    Dave

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Europe
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    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    I used the mono on some large spars. I found it to be slightly "draggy" in cooler temps, but only the smallest amount of thinner was needed to make excellent brush coverage....even if slightly over-thinned, runs will haunt you and you will need to keep going back over previous work, which results in a less than ideal finish. Would not hesitate to recommend Epifaines paint or varnish, especially rapid coat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Sunny Florida
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    553

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    Hi Mike - I used Epiphanes Mono on my project and I found that it worked quite well, even with my less than perfect surface prep. My hull is plywood glued lapstrake, so not a direct comparison however. I started with a couple of coats of West System epoxy and then two coats of Interlux 2-part Epoxy Primecoat, then finished off with 2 coats of the Epiphanes Mono red (this layering blessed by Epiphanes tech support, who are quite helpful.) I used the Epiphanes thinner, if I recall. First boat, I'm not a pro, but for my expectations it worked great - rolling and tipping with a foam roller and epiphanies brush, just as you plan to (I did spray the first coat, but it was such a pain that I rolled and tipped the final coat.) Like mentioned above, getting the thinner amount correct is important, so I started with a light hand, did some test applications, etc., but once I got it down, I was extremely pleased. Any imperfections were definitely due to my lax surface prep and inexperience, not the paint. Good luck with your paint job! Looking forward to pictures when it is done.

    [IMG]image by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]image by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]image by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG] by Jason D, on Flickr[/IMG]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Mystic, CT
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    I love it. I find it more pigment rich than other one part paints. When you mix it up, be generous with Penetrol and thinner (I use kerosene). I like to use interlux barrier coat as a primer. First coat is the thickest and get progressively thinner. I always count on applying at least three coats. With all the pigment, you should get almost a half gallon out of a quart. The thinner you apply it, the better.

    Cheers and good luck
    Dennis Doherty

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Little Egg Harbor, NJ
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    34

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    Mike,
    I found Epifanes easy enough to work with on it's own. I also mixed it with some Petit Easypoxy and Benjamin Moore Alkyd Urethane025.jpg020.jpg. No issues doing that.
    Remain In Neutral And Move On To The Next Target

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Central Vermont
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    319

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    Thanks for the helpful responses . . . I can only dream about ending up with a paint job that looks as good . . .

    I went to the Off Center website and watched a Nat Bryant video on fairing and painting. Good video in case you haven't checked it out.

    One thing he mentioned that caught my attention.

    He said they judge the thickness of the paint by getting a drip count off of the stirring stick. He said that they shoot for paint that drips off of the stick in about 6-8 seconds. So I was thinking about using that to get me in the ballpark on thinning.

    I was wondering if anyone had used that method, or would recommend another method for getting the paint thinned properly?

    Thanks again,

    Mike

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    650

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Seibert View Post
    .

    He said they judge the thickness of the paint by getting a drip count off of the stirring stick. He said that they shoot for paint that drips off of the stick in about 6-8 seconds. So I was thinking about using that to get me in the ballpark on thinning.

    I was wondering if anyone had used that method, or would recommend another method for getting the paint thinned properly?

    Thanks again,

    Mike
    If you're looking for something more precise you could use a viscosity cup. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_viscosity_cup You could either experiment on your own to determine the calibration or perhaps Epifanes would have a suggestion as to the proper numbers. The Epifanes help line is pretty helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Central Vermont
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    319

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    I just sent an email to Epifanes asking for the easiest way to tell when the paint is properly thinned. I will share what they give me for advice.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
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    9,092

    Default Re: Epifanes Monourethane Paint

    It will be interesting to see how it does. My 1960 Lippincott Starboat was glued cedar planking - deck, bottom and topsides, and it was constantly checking on a nearly weekly basis. I finally got tired of constantly painting over new cracks and finally set a layer of glass fabric and epoxy over the bottom and mahogany veneer set in and coated with epoxy on the topsides. Hopefully your epoxy barrier coat will be enough to retard the tendency to check.

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