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Thread: 16 lyss #993

  1. #1
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    Default 16 lyss #993

    First day building the boat.

    1. Materials.

    materials.jpg

    2. Cutting side panels.

    cutting side panels.jpg

    3. Glue and screw butt blocks.

    screwing butt blocks.JPG

    4. Side panels complete.

    side planels complete.jpg

    The bottom line is an inch shorter than the plans. I blame my cheap circular saw. I borrowed a friends much better circular saw and the remaining cuts were a piece of cake.

    I ordered the materials through a local lumber yard. The plans call for Sikaflex 291, but I was given Sikaflex polyurethane construction sealant. Can I use the construction sealant or should I return it and buy 291?

    One of the boxes of screws is labeled "coated decking screws". The remaining boxes of screws are labeled "stainless steal". The plans call for all screws to be stainless. Should I replace the coated screws with stainless steal?

    Thursday I will be working on the stern.
    Last edited by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL; 10-16-2017 at 06:44 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    you were sent a SEALANT not an ADHESIVE as per instructions

    COATED DECK SCREWS aint STAINLESS

    if you are doing an LYS i assume this will be one of your first if not your first build and following TRIED N TRUE instructions reduces your exposure to unpeasant results

    if you are ADVENTUROUS and don't mind scrapping a project and starting over use what they sent you

    if you don't mind paying for premium products and getting something less than premium go forth...

    my suggestion would be to contact the supplier and request they replace the WRONG STUFF w/ the RIGHT STUFF

    the LYS has a great reputation generated by a whole bunch of builders who followed the instructions and built some really fine boats

    GOOD LUCK W/ YOUR BUILD and keep us posted w/ lotsa pics

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    +1

    kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Transom complete!

    transom.jpg

    I'm totally confused about the next step. I cut out 4x4's to attach to the transom. I'm supposed to bevel the sides, and the bottom. I'm not sure if that means to bevel the plywood sides, or to attach the 4x4's to the sides of the transom at an offset angle. If anyone has any insight I would appreciate it.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    looks like a nice project. do you have pic of a finished one or a diagram of one?

    jim

  6. #6
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    I would double check my plans, but they are at home and I'm not. You are going to want a smooth bearing surface for the sides. Seems to me that you would bevel the 4 X 4's, attach them to the transom (flush to the edges) and then plane the edges of the transom to match the bevel of the 4 X 4's. This way, after you attach the sides to the stem and bend them around to fit the transom you'll have flat surfaces for the sides to land on. You could always give Walter a call. from what I've seen here on the forum, he is super helpful. I'm sure when i finally get started with my build, I'll be calling him.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    +1

    Important to note that the inside of your transom will be wider than than the outside, when beveling is complete.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    The two side panels need to be clamped together, and the bottom edge of the plywood needs to be faired. "Symmetry is really important". I think the right tool is a hand plane. I'm confused on which plane will do the job. I'm using 1/2" MDO for the side panels. I need a recommendation for the appropriate hand plane for the job.

    Picture of the side panels.

    side panels.jpg

  9. #9
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Last time I mated two boat side panels I used a sharp block plane, but see no reason why you couldn't use a Stanley #4, or really, whatever you are comfortable with. Work the tool at an angle to the edges being planed.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Quote Originally Posted by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL View Post
    I ordered the materials through a local lumber yard. The plans call for Sikaflex 291, but I was given Sikaflex polyurethane construction sealant. Can I use the construction sealant or should I return it and buy 291?

    One of the boxes of screws is labeled "coated decking screws". The remaining boxes of screws are labeled "stainless steal". The plans call for all screws to be stainless. Should I replace the coated screws with stainless steal?
    Yes return and buy correct, and yes, replace with stainless.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Is this one Old Wharfs/Walter's?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    If you haven't already, I would urge you to search out every LYS build on this forum. There are many pictures and tons of info that will prove invaluable to your build. I think I spent more time researching my LYS build on here than actually building it...And if all else fails call Walter, he's a nice guy and can answer any question.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Quote Originally Posted by callsign222 View Post
    Yes return and buy correct, and yes, replace with stainless.
    I took care of this last week. Thanks!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Quote Originally Posted by callsign222 View Post
    Is this one Old Wharfs/Walter's?
    Yes it is!

  15. #15
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Quote Originally Posted by seadog99 View Post
    If you haven't already, I would urge you to search out every LYS build on this forum. There are many pictures and tons of info that will prove invaluable to your build. I think I spent more time researching my LYS build on here than actually building it...And if all else fails call Walter, he's a nice guy and can answer any question.
    I printed the LYS build threads for guidance. I don't have that much experience with wood working tools. The only step I am completely and utterly unsure of is how to bevel the transom and stem. My buddy is coming over with a table saw this weekend to look at the plans. The posts in the thread we're helpful too.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    if it aint too late BEVEL THE EDGES(vertical) of the butt plates

    makes for a more harmonious outcome

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  17. #17
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Good job on getting started.

    As to what tool to make the 2 sides the same, use what you are comfortable with. I ended up using a combination of things, Japanese razor saw for trimming butt blocks, belt and orbital sanders to true up edges and a hand plane for some areas where more material needed removing.

    As for the bevels, yes bevel bottom and sides of transom to match bevel of sides and bottom shown in the plans. Also important on the chine logs (cut a 2x6 lengthwise with the table saw blade set to the angle of the bevel). As Maximus said, the idea is that the surfaces will be flat for attaching the bottom when that time comes. Not too fussy, you can plane some more before attaching the bottom if needed.

    Keep at it and take lots of pictures.

    John

  18. #18
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    1. Stem.

    stem.jpg

    2. Transom side posts beveled.

    transom sides.jpg

    3. Transom finished.

    transom complete.jpg

    4. Sides attached to stem.

    spanish windless.jpg

  19. #19
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Thanks for all of the advice so far!

    I asked my contractor buddy to come over with his table saw to help with the beveled cuts.

    He cut out the stem angle on paper and traced the paper onto the edge of the stem. It worked pretty good.

    The transom posts (made out of 4x4's) were beveled on the sides. I did not bevel the bottom. I also did not bevel the plywood, which the transom posts attach to. If I did it again I would bevel the plywood sides and bottom prior to attaching the beveled 4x4 posts. I would also bevel the 2x8 that attaches to the bottom of transom, and I would bevel the plywood at the bottom of the transom.

    I bought a block plane to smooth out the bottom edge of the boat sides. The sides were pretty uniform except a small area where the butt block holds the two plywood pieces together.

    I also scored a great deal on 3M marine adhesive on ebay. I was paying $27/10oz tube at west marine before.

    I'm going to try to bend the sides throughout the week so I can (hopefully) screw and glue the sides to the transom next weekend.
    Last edited by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL; 10-29-2017 at 04:53 PM.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Looking good! Starting to look like a boat.

    John

  21. #21
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    3M 5200 curing question!

    I'm planning on gluing the chines and the sides to the transom this weekend. 3m 5200 directions say to apply in at least 40*, and to cure at 70* for up to 7 days.

    It's getting cold in upstate New York, and my garage is not insulted or heated. Do I need to buy or borrow a heater for the garage? If I do, and run the heater for 48 hours, will that be enough to cure the 3M 5200? I don't want to run a kerosene or propane heater for a full week.

  22. #22

    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Quote Originally Posted by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL View Post
    3M 5200 curing question!

    I'm planning on gluing the chines and the sides to the transom this weekend. 3m 5200 directions say to apply in at least 40*, and to cure at 70* for up to 7 days.

    It's getting cold in upstate New York, and my garage is not insulted or heated. Do I need to buy or borrow a heater for the garage? If I do, and run the heater for 48 hours, will that be enough to cure the 3M 5200? I don't want to run a kerosene or propane heater for a full week.
    Here is an idea: use one or two oil-filled electric radiators. Put them under/inside the hull. Drape the hull with a tarp to make a tent to keep the heat in. This would be safer and cheaper than heating the whole garage with some kind of combustion heater.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    What Christopher said. We have a big, airy boat shop with a small wood stove, but work all winter using local applied heat for bonding operations with clip on lights and flood light bulbs, an oil filled radiator, and plastic drapes. This with epoxy which which is very temperature sensitive. The oil radiator is safer than other types of heaters, but make sure the cords are in good shape, and that the extension cord is heavy enough. Electrical fires are possible with bad or worn cords. In this pic, we are bonding some deck ledgers in the bow. We also will use a fan to distribute the heat.

    You are making good progress. Usually when questions arise, they work themselves out as you progress. Good luck with your project!





    The pic above shows a setup for gluing up parts off the boat, in this case the console.
    Last edited by jim_cricket; 11-04-2017 at 09:19 AM.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    While installing the transom to the side panels I noticed a major issue. The transom posts (the 4x4 in the picture below) were installed with the angle pointing towards the center line of the boat. The transom posts should have been installed with the angle pointing away from center line of the boat. This created a sizable gap:


    transom gap.jpg

    After briefly considering rebuilding the transom we decided to cut a wedge to fill the gap.

    incorrect transom angle 1 of 2.jpg

    The table saw used to make the cut for the wedge is a 20 minutes drive from my house. I measured the gap before making the trip. I cut two identical size wedge pieces. That was a big mistake, because the gap next to the second transom post was a 1/2" larger then the first transom gap pictured above. The wedge was way to small. Instead of making the drive back to the table saw to make a new correctly sized wedge I Macgyvered this:

    incorrect transom angle 2 of 2.jpg

    The result was really sloppy. If you look straight down from the top there is a small gap that goes entirely through to the bottom.

    What was supposed to be a 20 minute really rewarding step turned into three hours of frustration. The transom is finally on.

    chine.jpg
    Last edited by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL; 11-05-2017 at 04:30 PM.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    I also cut the chines today.

    Attachment 5441

    Due to the delay with the transom mishap I did not have time to install the chines. They are cut and ready to be installed.

    I doubt the chines (a 16'x2"x6", ripped in half the long way, and angled on one side) will be able to bend to conform to the shape of the side of the boat. I'm thinking about reducing the thickness from 1.5" nominal to 1.25" or even 1".

    I'm headed to Cape Cod next weekend to procure a trailer. I want to get the chines and bottom installed before Thanksgiving. I'm hosting this year and would like to be able to flip the boat before my family visits for the holiday.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL; 11-05-2017 at 04:59 PM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    I was going to tent the boat with a small heater under it to cure the 3M 5200. After a few cocktails on Friday my buddy suggested keeping the door between my house and garage open for a few nights. Although my garage is not insulated it retains heat okay. The highs and lows for the next week are above 50 and 30. This should do the trick without having to buy another heater.

    Attachment 5442
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by CHOWDAINABREADBOWL; 11-05-2017 at 04:59 PM.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    you might consider re-cutting the chines so the top surface(bottom surface in the above pic) slants down > inboard once installed

    having the top of the chines slanting toward the side of the hull will collect water :-O

    having them slanted down > inboard will automatically drain

    no need to ask me how i learned this one :-(

    EVERYTHING you can do to insure/facilitate water has no place to hide and drains automatically will be in your favor, TRUST ME!!!

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  28. #28
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Looking good! As to the chines bending, they are tough at full width. Some builds have used a planer to bring them down to 1" and it seems to help (I think there is a note about this in the plans too). Not having a planer, I just kept fighting with them until they behaved. Pre-bending them helps a bit. One other thing that helped was clamping a scrap 2x4 across the rear corner to keep the chine from climbing up out of the boat while it was being bent/clamped. It only took a morning of cursing and fighting with the chine to figure that one out.

    Keep up the good work and good photos.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Today I installed the chines.

    1. Finished product.

    Attachment 6192

    2. Port side chine.

    Attachment 6193

    3. Starboard side chine.

    chines right side.jpg

    The starboard side came out really nice. The port side is not flush with the side panel. I need to fair the edge, but I'm not sure what tool to use. I have a block plane, but I'm not that comfortable using. I'm thinking a sawzall might work.

    The plans called for the chines to be 1.5" wide. I used a table saw to bring it down to 1" wide, which allowed me to bend it to match the curve of the side panels with little difficulty. If I could do it again I would have just used 5/4 lumber.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  30. #30
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    I installed the chines.

    1. Finished product.

    chines full boat.jpg

    2. Port side chine.

    chines left side.jpg

    3. Starboard side chine.

    chines right side.jpg

    The starboard side came out really nice. The port side is not flush with the side panel. I need to fair the edge, but I'm not sure what tool to use. I have a block plane, but I'm not that comfortable using it. I'm thinking a sawzall might work.

    The plans called for the chines to be 1.5" wide. I used a table saw to bring it down to 1" wide, which allowed me to bend it to match the curve of the side panels with little difficulty. If I could do it again I would have just used 5/4 lumber.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    I'd use a belt sander before i hit that with a sawzall. 60 grit belt will take it down pretty quickly.

    If you don't have one, this would be a good excuse to buy a power plane. If you aren't comfortable with hand planes this tool will still take some getting used to, but you can set it for very light cuts and it will be forgiving. It also won't wear your arms out like a hand plane would.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Yesterday the chines were faired. The plunge tool worked great. It took maybe 45 minutes.

    1. The end result!
    fairing chines.jpg

    I mentioned the angles on the transom were screwed up. Basically I installed the transom butt on backwards. There is supposed to be a angle moving away from the bottom, but instead it angles towards the top of the boat. Instead of rebuilding the transom I cut wedges out of 2x4's.

    2. Picture of wedge 1 of 2.
    transom wedge 1 of 2.jpg

    3. Picture of wedge 2 of 2.
    transom wedge 2 of 2.jpg

    The bottom will be installed next weekend.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  33. #33
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    Quote Originally Posted by Maximus71 View Post
    I'd use a belt sander before i hit that with a sawzall. 60 grit belt will take it down pretty quickly.

    If you don't have one, this would be a good excuse to buy a power plane. If you aren't comfortable with hand planes this tool will still take some getting used to, but you can set it for very light cuts and it will be forgiving. It also won't wear your arms out like a hand plane would.
    My buddy said the belt sander would take to long. I almost bought a power planer, but the I chose the plunge tool instead. It worked great!

  34. #34
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    1. Bottom glued and screwed.
    bottom 1 of 2.jpg

    2. Intentional overhang. The excess will be removed with the plunge tool.
    bottom 2 of 2.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  35. #35
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    Default Re: 16 lyss #993

    At the risk of sounding completely clueless, what is a plunge tool?

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