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Thread: Bead and Flute mystery

  1. #1
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    Default Bead and Flute mystery

    Friend,
    I've attached a picture of 9/16" X 1 " strips which have a bead and flute. I want to mill my own and would like your best guess as to the radius of the bead. This is for my Haven 12 hull. Also, any thoughts on where I might purchase the matched set of router bits for the profile.
    As always, thanks your help.
    CraigHaven Strips.jpg

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    I would guess that the radius of the bead is 9/32".
    Lee Valley makes a nifty bead-and-cove bit, but I don't know about the sizes.
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Woodcraft, and I believe Rockler also sell bead and cove bits from a variety of vendors.

    As Brian pointed out, the cutter radius is generally 1/2 the thickness of the strips.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  4. #4
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Yes, Lee Valley, but not their B&C bits, they have too small a radius.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/Pag...68,69435,62157

    16J5006


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Wow... You guys are fast. Thanks a bunch...

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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    It might be of some slight help to know that those matched bits are most often called 'bead & cove'.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Those are for 1/4", you'll need to extrapolate. (I haven't used that word in a long while.)


    I very much prefer the larger radius, it avoids the knife edge and still allows for tight seams. I've done a LOT of this.

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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    It might be of some slight help to know that those matched bits are most often called 'bead & cove'.
    Well, the cove was traditionally for "fluting" of columns and such, so they're known by both. Terminology depends on what "world" you're working in - furniture or boats.

    As you say, looking for matched sets it may be bead and flute or bead and cove.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Or, as is the case with the Lee Valley bit, internal and external bullnose bits.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoez View Post
    Well, the cove was traditionally for "fluting" of columns and such, so they're known by both. Terminology depends on what "world" you're working in - furniture or boats.

    As you say, looking for matched sets it may be bead and flute or bead and cove.
    Indeed. I should have also mentioned that the matching set is sometimes called 'canoe' bits.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Indeed. I should have also mentioned that the matching set is sometimes called 'canoe' bits.
    Yep. That too.

    Whatever you do, avoid the ones that have both cutters stacked on the same bit. Exposes more cutter than you have to and changes the "whip" of the cutter between the two. DAMHIKT.

    I prefer having the pair of cutters and being able to set them up together in a router table so that you cut both profiles at the same time. Prevents damage to one contour or the other as you try to make a second pass.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  13. #13
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    And then you only need to pass them through once, a good time saver.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    When we built the Lapworth36's at Carl Chapman Boat Works, in Newport Beach CA we had a spindle shaper that had a set of custom cutters for making up the cove and bullnose beaded staving we used. It was just a big router. Dust collection is the primary concern! Actually, running the stock through a sticker at a mill is much less hassle!
    It might save you the expense of making up your own in the long run!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 10-11-2017 at 02:45 PM.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Bead and Flute mystery

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    And then you only need to pass them through once, a good time saver.
    A Wee Lassie Canoe used about 1/4 linear mile of strips to build a boat. We could mold them in about 40 minutes.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



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