Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: New or old technique ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    129

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    531

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Cool! Not something I can afford, but very neat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    10,432

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    In truth, I see no great advantage, for boat building, unless, it is more cost effective than metal fastenings. The advantage of screws, bolts and rivets is the fact that they draw a joint together. However, when used in conjunction with adhesives this product may be a breakthrough for hanging planking. The sheer factor of lateral loading is also a consideration. I also wonder about the projected longevity of such fastenenings. This is not to say that it is not a viable product for use in building wooden boats. New products, often, take a bit of time to be accepted in certain trades. Heck who wouldn't want to be inspired by the thought of air driven tunnels if cost effectiveness and longevity were to be advantageous!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 10-10-2017 at 11:55 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    41,380

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    In truth, I see no great advantage, for boat building, unless, it is more cost effective than metal fastenings. The advantage of screws, bolts and rivets is the fact that they draw a joint together. However, when used in conjunction with adhesives this product may be a breakthrough for hanging planking. The sheer factor of lateral loading is also a consideration. I also wonder about the projected longevity of such fastenenings. This is not to say that it is not a viable product for use in building wooden boats. New products, often, take a bit of time to be accepted in certain trades. Heck who wouldn't want to be inspired by the thought of air driven tunnels if cost effectiveness and longevity were to be advantageous!
    Jay
    Yes - I think we'd have to play with one to see if it might have some utility in certain applications. Some possibilities spring to mind... but nothing obvious.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,137

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Down in the FAQ section somebody asked about tropical woods and/or oak. The reply:

    "In principle, yes. As described in Eurocode 5, table 8.2, attention must be paid to the density of the wood type when fastening wood using pin-shaped connectors. Only woods with a density less than 500 kg/m may be nailed without pre-drilling."

    I don't know where white oak falls in the "kg/m3" spectrum but I bet it is up there. I also wonder how much waste there is in making the nails themselves. Not that I dislike the concept, just looking past the marketing.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,650

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    In truth, I see no great advantage, for boat building, unless, it is more cost effective than metal fastenings. The advantage of screws, bolts and rivets is the fact that they draw a joint together. However, when used in conjunction with adhesives this product may be a breakthrough for hanging planking. The sheer factor of lateral loading is also a consideration. I also wonder about the projected longevity of such fastenenings. This is not to say that it is not a viable product for use in building wooden boats. New products, often, take a bit of time to be accepted in certain trades. Heck who wouldn't want to be inspired by the thought of air driven tunnels if cost effectiveness and longevity were to be advantageous!
    Jay
    Plastic nails were marketed for double diagonal, these would work there and in edge nailing strip until the glue sets up. They would be too skinny for hanging carvel plank though.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    6,235

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Just hope you never make a mistake and have to pull one out.

    What's so funny about peace love & understanding?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,498

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Hey! It's Lignostone! I've always wondered why things made of it weren't more common. Back in the days when high-end cross country skis were made from wood, a typical construction was made up from four or five different layers, each made of small pieces, with a softwood core essentially surrounded by a box made from small hardwood pieces. The running surfaces were generally hickory, treated with pine tar and then waxed. The outside edges of the running surface on better quality skis were a small strip of Lignostone about 1/8" square in cross section. It was resin impregnated (phenolic, I assume) mechanically compressed (under tons of pressure and maybe some heat) beech wood. It made for a much tougher edge than the hickory would have and resisted rounding-off over time in use. I'm not sure the idea of nailing with it will be a big success, but it is very tough stuff.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tuckahoe
    Posts
    7,414

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    Down in the FAQ section somebody asked about tropical woods and/or oak. The reply:

    "In principle, yes. As described in Eurocode 5, table 8.2, attention must be paid to the density of the wood type when fastening wood using pin-shaped connectors. Only woods with a density less than 500 kg/m may be nailed without pre-drilling."

    I don't know where white oak falls in the "kg/m3" spectrum but I bet it is up there. I also wonder how much waste there is in making the nails themselves. Not that I dislike the concept, just looking past the marketing.
    500kg/M^3 is about 31 lbs/ft^3, wood is quite variable, of course, espescially accounting for moisture, but white oak is in the range of 40-45 lbs/ft^3 so a bit heavy in this application.
    Steve Martinsen

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,216

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Possible uses in strip and double diagonal but nice in house finish work and laid flooring .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Newport News, VA
    Posts
    2,521

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Those wood nails won't rot.
    Although what about wracking twisting pulling forces of a moving boat hull. I think you need to use these with glued construction.
    And I doubt they can penetrate well hardwoods used for boat framing, so then predrill holes.

    'The nails are made from compressed beech wood. To save the wood of fungal infection and moisture absorption it is infiltrated with 22% of Phenolic resin.'

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    New jersey
    Posts
    2,436

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Roy underhill calls them trunnels. A corruption of tree nails.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    17,357

    Default Re: New or old technique ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Boater14 View Post
    Roy underhill calls them trunnels. A corruption of tree nails.
    Or, a corruption of "Through Nails" (nails in a trepanned hole!)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •