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Thread: Japan Photos

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I mentioned this book https://www.amazon.com/Samurai-Willi.../dp/0142003786
    It contains an account of an execution by burning at the stake. Not so much burning on a fire, but roasting in a ring of fire. The Japanese of that time employed some very cruel sanctions against their criminals.
    Not so long ago, POWs in Japanese prison camps too.

    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/40017577.cms

    As for the crucifixion of Christian converts in Nagasaki, the Inquisition imposed by the Portuguese in Goa (India) in the 16 th century was conducted zealously, on a large scale, with tremendous cruelty.

    In fact, the Portuguese moved on south to Kerala (an adjoining state), where India´s record - the only country on the planet which has never persecuted Jews - was breached. They also harassed the Syrian/Orthodox Christians, who date back to Christ himself.

    So it is with humanity.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    I could look at these pics for hours, thanks.
    He's a Mexican. -- Donald Trump.
    America cannot survive another four years of Barack Obama. -- Governor Chris Christie (R) New Jersey
    It wasn't racism, it was an attack on Christianity. -- Fox News
    Crying white mothers are ratings gold. -- National Rifle Association

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    From my visit yesterday to the Nagasaki museum of history and culture, a replica of a fumi-e, an image used to force Christians to step on, to either renounce Christianity, or expose themselves as secret Christians. Fumi-e were prominent in the movie, Silence. The original versions were paper, then wood, and later versions copper, as below. Note that on the sign below fumi-e has no translation to English:


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  4. #74
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    Coffee has a long history in Nagasaki, I think introduced by the Dutch in the mid 1800s. There are many small coffee shops, some roast their own beans, and most use "hand pour" or "nel drip" methods. It takes a while, you don't zip in for take out on your way to work. The following photos are from a coffee shop near Suwa jinja, that roasts its own beans, and boils the water in pottery made by friends of the owner.

    Some sake vessels (I think) in the window of the coffee shop, from potter friends of the owner:



    Grinders:



    The stove, and heating pots:



    Pots, used here to display labels of the different possible coffee beans for one's cup of coffee:



    Two tables are on the second floor, with tatami mats. Tomoka instructed me not to step on the lines between the mats, as her grandmother instructed her:



    The coffee, and also cups of cold blossom tea, and a piece of pumpkin cheesecake:




    .
    Last edited by twodot; 10-23-2017 at 06:42 AM.
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  5. #75
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    Some rice bowls for sale in the coffee shop:



    Tomoka:




    I didn't get a photo of the actual brewing of the coffee, I will have to go back.
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  6. #76
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post


    I didn't get a photo of the actual brewing of the coffee, I will have to go back.
    We do appreciate your willingness to suffer for our entertainment
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  7. #77
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    ^ exactly my thought.. (-;

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Some more details from the museum.

    The corner from post #71 above:






    This shoji does not have the weave lattice:








    Last time I posted a lot of details such as this:


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  9. #79
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    At the museum there was a special traveling exhibit on the Nagasaki painter and naturalist, Kawahara Keiga. Photos were not allowed on 90% of the paintings, but I managed to take two before this was pointed out to me.




    In Nagasaki the word for kite, hata, is different from the rest of Japan and literally translates as "flag", inspired by the red, white, and blue flags and banners of the Dutch ships.

    The artificial island, Dejima, is in the lower right of the scene below. Dejima was constructed to limit contact of the traders and the Japanese, and served as the customs office. It was featured at the end of the movie, Silence:




    The painting below is not by Kawahara Keiga. Dejima is the red crescent right of center. The white neighborhood indicates a different tax structure than the red:





    This scene might be from an era earlier than Dejima:





    Nagasaki harbour, 1866:


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  10. #80
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post
    Yeah, I think that you are right, they are both decorative and functional. Here is another one, of the post just to the left of the one in the above photo:

    So that's where the old growth Doug Fir went. Well, there and in a lot of indifferently built homes in mid century America.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    I should note, no resentment toward Japan or the Japanese for buying North American timber, especially not when used so beautifully. I am a little rueful that North Americans didn't know what they had until it was gone.

  12. #82
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    The wood in post #63 looks almost like plastic, discolored by soot or spalting. Hinoki, perhaps? Hinoki was used for Shinto shrines. Hinoki is a cousin of Port Orford cedar, which is not a cedar (like I know what I am talking about, I just googled it). A lot of Port Orford cedar was imported to Japan, for sushi bar tops, and soaking tubs.

    Suwa shrine is a mid-level shrine, nationally in Japan, and so I imagine that the craftsman working on any project would be among the best in the country.
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  13. #83
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    We kind of like "a lot of details such as this:"

    Thanks for this thread, Tom, it is a soothing respite.
    Steve Martinsen

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    When I worked the inside passage in Alaska during the "pipeline" years they were sending whole cedar logs to Japan by the ship load out of Haynes.
    The ships were Japanese and there was always one in port loading logs, nice logs...
    Just a little ways from the pier was the mill with an ancient single screw tug that brought a small raft of barked logs to the ship which loaded the logs with deck mounted cranes. They filled it full, even a deck load.
    We always tied up at the same pier near them and I was able to get a "tour" from keel to truck. A smallish ship as they go it was powered by a 6 cylinder Diesel and just slogged back and forth from Haynes to Japan. I understood there were two ships, one ways always at sea and there was only a day or so that one was not in port.
    The engine was interesting, a direct reversible job maybe 20 feet tall and 60 feet long, It got my attention that one cylinder was apart and the valves were standing on the deck but no one was working on it. I asked why and they said it was always apart, that the ship never stopped, they would rebuild one cylinder at a time while it was under weigh. To handle the various parts there was a gantry crane (part of the vessel) that ran the length of the engine room. The ship ran on 5 cylinders, back and forth, there was no hurry, the logs would be there forever...

    Onboard the ship it was very much a familial situation, there was laundry hanging all along the rails, and fresh fish drying on lines strung up across the deck. Everyone seemed happy and friendly they were proud to give me the tour, it was a fun afternoon off watch for me.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Hinoki (Cypress) wood box

    IMG_3260.JPG

  16. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMARTINSEN View Post
    We kind of like "a lot of details such as this:"
    OK! More details from the recreation of the governor's offices:












    Recreation of an outhouse:





    We watched a short play re-enacting the governor hearing a court case. Not as compelling as Rashomon, but fun. The man with his face down stands accused of embezzling money related to the Kunchi festival, accused by the man on the mat next to him. They are from the same village and know each other well. The man confessed to taking the money, but he said it was to buy better costumes for the Kunchi performers, in order to compete with the other neighborhoods participating in the festival. At the end all understood his motive, but he was still sentenced to 30 days in prison. He flashed me the peace sign, which was cool.




    The flat stones in the foreground date to the Edo period.


    .
    Last edited by twodot; 10-24-2017 at 03:51 AM.
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  17. #87
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    New and old houses, adjacent on a narrow street near the coffee shop:











    Windows. The windows in the first photo appear to have sliding storm doors on their exterior:



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  18. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    The engine was interesting, a direct reversible job maybe 20 feet tall and 60 feet long,
    That's 10 feet per cylinder, wow.
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  19. #89
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    How did those houses survive the WW2 firebombing ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    How did those houses survive the WW2 firebombing ?
    The neighborhood, like the Suwa shrine, is in the lee of Mt. Konpira. That is what saved Suwa jinja from the bomb. Another possibility is that the houses are old, but post-war. As for bombings other than the bomb, those likely targeted Mitsubishi plants, which were in other areas of Nagasaki.

    As I said above, some amazing huge, old trees survived. I thought that they were oak, but I now know that they are camphor, kusunoki.
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  21. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post
    That's 10 feet per cylinder, wow.
    Well, maybe only 50 Feet! They were individual cylinders.

    I remember something similar to this...


  22. #92
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    This is a wonderful thread.

    I couldn't see the photographs on my other computer. I'm so glad I checked on this one.
    Skip

    ---This post is delivered with righteous passion and with a solemn southern directness --
    ...........fighting against the deliberate polarization of politics...

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    I "collect" Tom's photos from Japan!
    In case the forum or the image hosting service crashes...

  24. #94
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    Another scene, from the steam ship era. The topography is completely changed by land fill, but I think that portions of the wall remain. I will seek it out.

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  25. #95
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    From the museum:

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  26. #96
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    Party at seafood restaurant, t=0:





    t=90 min:







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  27. #97
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    The camphor tree that survived the bomb, in the lee of Mt. Konpira. Neco-chan for scale.


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  28. #98
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Camphor laurels have become a pest species here, they were imported as a shade tree but adapted too well.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  29. #99
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    There is a new knife shop since I was last in Nagasaki. It is a small shop, and sells very high end chef's knives. The least expensive knife is about $280 US.

    Five examples of usuba. Usuba are very thin knives for slicing vegetables. They are single bevel, and some are hollow ground on the back side, such as the middle one in the photo below. You sharpen them as you would a chisel. They are gloriously fun to use to slice onions and garlic. The steel is layered in all of the knives below, and a couple are Damascus. I like the ones with the dimpled surface, but I think that I would purchase the one in the middle. The knives below ranged from $280 to $380 US. You get what you pay for, I have an usuba knife that cost $180, but these are much nicer.





    The ones on the shelf below are sakana, fish cutting knives, and are much thicker, although still single bevel.
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  30. #100
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    Details of a new yakitori cafe:






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  31. #101
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post
    There is a new knife shop since I was last in Nagasaki. It is a small shop, and sells very high end chef's knives. The least expensive knife is about $280 US.

    Five examples of usuba. Usuba are very thin knives for slicing vegetables. They are single bevel, and some are hollow ground on the back side, such as the middle one in the photo below. You sharpen them as you would a chisel. They are gloriously fun to use to slice onions and garlic. The steel is layered in all of the knives below, and a couple are Damascus. I like the ones with the dimpled surface, but I think that I would purchase the one in the middle. The knives below ranged from $280 to $380 US. You get what you pay for, I have an usuba knife that cost $180, but these are much nicer.





    The ones on the shelf below are sakana, fish cutting knives, and are much thicker, although still single bevel.
    Nice!
    I wonder if the prices are any better there, than on the internet. I have bought a few Japanese knives and other edged tools directly from Japan and it seemed reasonable. If you can call a several hundred dollar knife that!

  32. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I wonder if the prices are any better there, than on the internet. I have bought a few Japanese knives and other edged tools directly from Japan and it seemed reasonable. If you can call a several hundred dollar knife that!
    I don't know, since there is a broad spectrum of quality and prices, and I have not compared the price of the exact same item in the US and Japan.

    Here is a high end woodworking tool shop in Sakai, near Osaka, if you would like to buy a $596 US hand saw:

    http://japantool-iida.com/saw/2008/0...iridetail.html

    Or a $500+ US smoothing plane:

    http://japantool-iida.com/plane_smoo...t-mainten.html
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  33. #103
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post
    There is a new knife shop since I was last in Nagasaki. It is a small shop, and sells very high end chef's knives. The least expensive knife is about $280 US.

    Five examples of usuba. Usuba are very thin knives for slicing vegetables. They are single bevel, and some are hollow ground on the back side, such as the middle one in the photo below. You sharpen them as you would a chisel. They are gloriously fun to use to slice onions and garlic. The steel is layered in all of the knives below, and a couple are Damascus. I like the ones with the dimpled surface, but I think that I would purchase the one in the middle. The knives below ranged from $280 to $380 US. You get what you pay for, I have an usuba knife that cost $180, but these are much nicer.





    The ones on the shelf below are sakana, fish cutting knives, and are much thicker, although still single bevel.
    Are any Japanese food prep knives double bevel?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  34. #104
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Are any Japanese food prep knives double bevel?
    I’ve seen a lot of them, including in the shop today, but they aren’t as cool to my eye and I don’t pay attention to them. I haven’t figured out what is historically Japanese versus “western.”
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  35. #105
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    Default Re: Japan Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by twodot View Post
    I’ve seen a lot of them, including in the shop today, but they aren’t as cool to my eye and I don’t pay attention to them. I haven’t figured out what is historically Japanese versus “western.”
    And . . . do they make knives with the bevel on the left for left handed chefs?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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