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Thread: No skills & reaching for the stars

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    se pa (Bristol PA)
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    1,980

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    Please feel free to discuss the issue at hand even though the OP seems to left the room.. or woke up from the dream?
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    384

    Default

    You're right. What's the point in spending time and energy when the one who has asked in the first place does not show any reactions, interest or signs of life?

    Sent from my SM-G900FD using Tapatalk
    fair winds, Dody

    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    vancouver, british columbia
    Posts
    1,010

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    Be patient - I'm sure he'll be back. As history has shown us, it takes more than the spectre of utter defeat to dissuade a Texan from his chosen course of action...

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
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    1,980

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    Be patient - I'm sure he'll be back. As history has shown us, it takes more than the spectre of utter defeat to dissuade a Texan from his chosen course of action...
    This same type of discussion happens at least once or twice a month on some of the sailing forums I'm on. I just wish one of them would follow through so we could follow the build like our friends up in Massachusetts!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 10-05-2017 at 07:33 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    10,435

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    We thought that, a person we were planning to hire, had no interest in the job we were offering due to his lack of response. Then we discovered that his father had just passed on. So, I opt for a bit of patience here.
    Jay

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,621

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    It's pretty but the mainmast blocking the main companionway doesn't work for me.
    ?!? how is that companion way not off center... that's crazy...?

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    42,523

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    Some of us deeply believe that hatches and companionways should be on the centerline to protect against down-flooding during a knockdown. And you don't have to be off-shore to get caught by a gust, especially if racing.

    It must be twenty years ago now I heard the Coast Guard and some sailors on the radio. Seems a sloop had gone down and the couple sailing were missing. As I headed over - we were a couple miles away - I was listening to the chatter and observing the day. It was one of those glorious not-a-cloud-in-the-sky days and blowing Strong Breeze to Near Gale (Force 6 to 7, wind mostly around 30 knots) from the northwest. Warm and sunny for a early spring day. They were coming back from a night at Cuttyhunk and headed for Oak Bluffs. After running and broad reaching in the lee of Naushon they passed Tarpolin Cove and began angling more east, loosing their lee and getting into steepish juvenile storm chop. It appears they broached, rolled over on the side the open companionway was, and fast glug.

    It had a tragic ending. I'd just joined in the search grid when we all heard on the radio that one of the Coast Guard boats had found them, in PFDs and tied together. We learned later that he was already dead from hypothermia while she died on the way to Woods Hole.

    In those conditions, we were sailing with all (on centerline) hatches closed and dogged, all portholes closed. But I grew up racing, where pushing the sail area limit is routine, and then MORC racing where one can easily add fatigue induced bad judgement to competitive zeal and risk taking. Securing all hatches is one of the simpler good habits one might keep. This couple were more overnight cruise yachties and did not have the habit.

    I've sailed similar boats with on-center hatches, sailed through cockpit filling knockdowns. It's me. The hatches were secured. But I noticed that had the companion been open, the boat floated high enough rail well under, cockpit coaming well under, spreaders not quite in the water, that we'd have been safe if we didn't take a bad lurch or something.

    And there's the point - any boat that has a self-bailing cockpit and is meant for seriously exposed long shore travel really should have all the big holes down the centerline.

    People who have followed my LastBoat - Meg Merrilies - build may recall that, having the temerity to figure I could improve an LFH design, I got Mike Mason to design a break in the cabinline aft of the mainmast and an enlarged sort of hatch-house over the forepeak mainly to get that forepeak hatch facing aft on center rather than facing port and well over to port.

    This mania for centerline is not appropriate for all possible boats. Marmalade's companion is off-set to starboard to get down along side the huge centerboard trunk. The cockpit is not self-bailing to ocean standards anyway. The one long knockdown we had we took aboard six tons (Really!) of water before rounding up and staggering upright. Nothing down the companion, just through the cockpit that's really scuppered to barely keep up with a heavy rain and has no watertight hatches.

    On the boat in question - I've sailed a boat that had a binnacle with a footprint about as big as that mast. Not raked like the mast but only 3' high so as obstructions go, pretty equivalent. It was 13" abaft the companion. It made a great handhold, especially when getting out in a seaway, as there comes a point emerging to deck level from deep cabin with a low coach house around, that having something to grab as you stand is quite nice. And we had no problems getting things in and out, carrying food and beer at times.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    13,203

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    I put Woodwinds companionway off to one side to give room around the mizzen. Only had one knockdown in thirty plus years . Gulf Stream cold eddy. And of course the off center companionway was on the low side . Couple hundred gallons came below in about 5 seconds .

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Padanaram, MA USA
    Posts
    9,246

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    It's a PITA, but you can calculate where the waterline is at varying heel angles.
    A narrow low-freeboard boat will be more problematic than something beamy and tall.

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    10,435

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    We always sailed with the after hatch shut on "Wind Born" as it was off set to stbd. Never had a knock down, but, that boat was a Bill Garden Turkey! It was great when motor sailing. Had a choppy motion and was lousy going to weather!
    Jay

  11. #81
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    11,803

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    I think if you are going to have a greenhouse on board, centred hatch makes most sense. That way you can have rows of plantings evenly spaced either side, so as not to upset the boats trim.

  12. #82
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    10,435

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    Yes and it will promote fungus and rot as well!
    Jay

  13. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,139

    Default Re: No skills & reaching for the stars

    I still think a big trimaran is in order. Keep your living quarters in the center, the green houses out in the amas and put solar panels where you would normally have trampolines.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

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