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Thread: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

  1. #1
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    Default Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    I really feel like I'm on a decline mentally and physically and possibly it's affecting my safety-conscious common sense after 30 plus years in business thinking safety first for enployees and people on the job. I guess that is what made me into a micro-managing control freak. Only one incident one of my friends helping us on a job who really has no construction experience put his foot through an attic ceiling and a very old Victorian house.

    Back to the accident; I set up my newly built but hardly used router table with a large 45 degree router bit to cut v notches in parts of the piano bench where the corner braces will go.

    Ran a couple of scrap wood samples realized the work had to be clamped to miter slide fence. Ran a couple more sample tries, satisfied with everything set up the first piece of mahogany for the first V groove to cut very carefully and slowly.

    This is when things went very badly! very quickly , within seconds! "Someone" forgot to tighten the wing nut on the router base clamp! (Yeah the spring-loaded pin that keeps it from falling out was is missing)

    Routers are loud enough but when they're inside a table base the resonance is even stronger. Very distracting also.

    The router dropped!! in a heartbeat I was across the room and pulled the plug because I forgot about the switch on the speed control I actually fell, and here comes the router still run at a high speed rolling across the floor chasing me!! Yipes!!! Like a scene from the movie it seemed like a supernatural force was in operation OMG LOL

    Anyway after I calmed down, I went back and investigate, the large 45 degree carbide cutters had pieces missing, there were Cuts inside the aluminum router base the router itself was okay, the router cabinet opening was okay but I was shaken up!

    Well we have had almost a solid week of sweltering weather and I do not do well at all when it's warm and my basement is very very warm also so all this took its toll on me I'm hoping to get back to work on the boat restoration in the next few days slow going but very enjoyable they're very little power tool help needed!





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    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    That is indeed an Ohhh Shettt! I hate it when that happens! Also, I wear boots in the shop to avoid getting my feet cut by who knows what till after it happens!

    Glad you are OK Denise!
    Jay

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    That is indeed an Ohhh Shettt! I hate it when that happens! Also, I wear boots in the shop to avoid getting my feet cut by who knows what till after it happens!

    Glad you are OK Denise!
    Jay
    Me too! Thanks Jay! It was freaky, and I actually made 4 safety runs on scrap first!
    The good news is the 45 degree cuts are perfect.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    We are much more lucky than we might admit sometimes. Glad that only stuff, and not you, lost parts in the exchange.

    Human nature gets the best of even the most safety conscious occasionally. The thing that I have the most trouble with is that I sometimes apparently act as if I'm immune to such problems. Occasionally I see that I'm about to do something that violates my safety rules but keep going anyway.

    Hey, I can handle this.----------Not always, it seems.

    A too large sheet of ply on the tablesaw without adequate side support. A quick release and jump later, along with a partially ruined sheet of ply spinning on the blade that was set too high anyway. Yeah, both lazy and careless can be a bad combination. Time to quit and go watch TV.

    I second the thought about flip flops.
    Tom L

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Glad you are ok Denise! I had a similar, if not quite so dramatic, moment recently when the jig saw I was using kicked back and plunged into the deck about an inch from my unprotected (yes, flip flops again) foot. Lesson learned.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Yup, about fifteen years ago I had the router table set up with a fence to cut a rabbet in some oak molding pieces for a mirror frame. Somehow (I'm still not sure how) during the feeding of one piece I managed to hit the spinning bit with the tip of my left index finger. The impact was amazing - like a finger being hit end-on with a baseball bat. Luckily, it only took a tiny chunk out of my finger tip (really lucky for a guy who owns a bunch of expensive guitars). I still use my router, but the memory of that incident makes sure I'm not pushing my luck. They bite!

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Glad you are ok Denise! I had a similar, if not quite so dramatic, moment recently when the jig saw I was using kicked back and plunged into the deck about an inch from my unprotected (yes, flip flops again) foot. Lesson learned.
    Thanks! it happened so fast! The split second while diving for the plug, the screaming router seemed to making like a guided rolling missile coming at me.

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    Last edited by DeniseO30; 09-28-2017 at 07:07 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    I avoid routers, cross cutting with table saws,belt sanders and cops.
    Disc sanders on the other hand.....

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Shop machinery accidents are scary fast.

    Years ago Fine Woodworking magazine did a survey of their readers asking about their shop accidents, and the answers in the following summary article were illuminating. It was because these readers were people like myself- dedicated one man shops, hard core, life long, part time wood workers, etc.
    The number one offender was the table saw, with the other typical shop machines far less offending. The damages were sobering: loss of blood, loss of time, loss of body parts, etc.
    But the real eye opener was the reasons the subscribers gave as the cause of the accidents.

    - I was doing a repetitive task and didn't it pay attention
    - I was doing something that felt un-safe, but continued anyway
    - I was behind schedule/ was hurrying/was distracted but continued anyway

    So, this was people very much like myself who had bad accidents and lost blood, body parts, etc. I tried to pay attention, because it was inevitable I would find myself in exactly the same situations again, and I did not want to lose time/blood/body parts like these wood workers had reported. This was way more effective than Ny OSHA inspector or rule. Sorry I can't remember the date of the article, it was probably 30 years ago, but I can recite the salient points and conclusions like it was yesterday.

    "There go I, but for the grace of God"

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    When I bought my (right tilt, as are most) Unisaw 25 years ago, the power switch was to the right of the saw blade. If there was a bind or other incident that needed the saw turned off, reaching the switch meant leaning my body over right in front of the spinning saw blade. After having a couple incidents that showed that this is the least safe and worse place to have the main switch, I moved it. Its now on the left corner with a home made paddle over it such that any bump with the hand or leg or whatever turns it off. Delta should have had it that way from the start. Wonder how many "incidents" could have been avoided with this simple modification?

    I love my tablesaw but it is dangerous. Luckily, the thing exudes power and demands caution from the wise.
    Tom L

  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Lathrop View Post
    When I bought my (right tilt, as are most) Unisaw 25 years ago, the power switch was to the right of the saw blade. If there was a bind or other incident that needed the saw turned off, reaching the switch meant leaning my body over right in front of the spinning saw blade. After having a couple incidents that showed that this is the least safe and worse place to have the main switch, I moved it. Its now on the left corner with a home made paddle over it such that any bump with the hand or leg or whatever turns it off. Delta should have had it that way from the start. Wonder how many "incidents" could have been avoided with this simple modification?

    I love my tablesaw but it is dangerous. Luckily, the thing exudes power and demands caution from the wise.
    Oh yes Tom, I have one of the original Delta contractor saws thankfully the switch is just the right location for a left thigh, many many times it's come in handy!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    It's not just your age. I look back on some of the jobs I did in boatyards forty years ago (in my twenties) and I should have died many times over.
    "... and the great shroud of the sea rolled on as it rolled five thousand years ago."

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    Shop machinery accidents are scary fast.
    But the real eye opener was the reasons the subscribers gave as the cause of the accidents.
    - I was doing a repetitive task and didn't it pay attention
    - I was doing something that felt un-safe, but continued anyway
    - I was behind schedule/ was hurrying/was distracted but continued anyway
    Eighteen months ago I had my table saw incident, basically due to reason #2 cited by Paul. Cutting a v-groove on a small test piece without proper support or a push stick. I was relatively lucky in that I only cut a small notch in the end of my index finger (although x-rays later showed that I had nicked the bone). I shut off the saw, looked at my finger and realized a band-aid wasn't going to be adequate. When I yelled into the house to my wife that she had better take me to the hospital, the first thing she asked was "Have you got all the bits you cut off?" A trip to Emergency and 3 stitches later and I came home rather chastened. It took me a few days before I could work up the nerve to use the saw again. I still don't have full feeling back in the fingertip, which actually serves as a constant reminder to be more careful.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Plunge cut with a 4 1/2 inch circular saw, it's kind of a one handed tool so I wobbled and it backed up, fast. I let go of the trigger immediately but not before it had gathered up my loose shirt tail and nicked the fabric on my shorts. Shirt tail was shredded, but luckily not me. I could have supported the work piece better and gone to the bigger saw for the plunge cut, and stood farther to the side. Tuck in the shirt.

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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Glad you are allright, Denise. That is the main thing.

    And thanks for sharing. These cautionary tales bear telling.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Take your rings, watch, necklaces and bracelets off also.
    "... and the great shroud of the sea rolled on as it rolled five thousand years ago."

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Glad you are allright, Denise. That is the main thing.

    And thanks for sharing. These cautionary tales bear telling.

    Kevin
    Thanks Kevin! The embarrassment factor keeps many of us from sharing a "bad" story but we are all human and sometimes no matter how careful we are things happen.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    I learned yesterday that if you touch, just for a brief moment, the side of a spinning drill bit with the pad of your finger, it will peel a neat little gouge out, clean as a whistle. Ahem.

    If you are quick, you won't get blood on anything.

    Peace,
    Robert

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    Shop machinery accidents are scary fast.

    Years ago Fine Woodworking magazine did a survey of their readers asking about their shop accidents, and the answers in the following summary article were illuminating. It was because these readers were people like myself- dedicated one man shops, hard core, life long, part time wood workers, etc.
    The number one offender was the table saw, with the other typical shop machines far less offending. The damages were sobering: loss of blood, loss of time, loss of body parts, etc.
    But the real eye opener was the reasons the subscribers gave as the cause of the accidents.

    - I was doing a repetitive task and didn't it pay attention
    - I was doing something that felt un-safe, but continued anyway
    - I was behind schedule/ was hurrying/was distracted but continued anyway

    So, this was people very much like myself who had bad accidents and lost blood, body parts, etc. I tried to pay attention, because it was inevitable I would find myself in exactly the same situations again, and I did not want to lose time/blood/body parts like these wood workers had reported. This was way more effective than Ny OSHA inspector or rule. Sorry I can't remember the date of the article, it was probably 30 years ago, but I can recite the salient points and conclusions like it was yesterday.

    "There go I, but for the grace of God"

    I recall what is probably the same article. One of the takeaways I have is a point raised by an emergency room doctor who was interviewed. He reported that in nearly every case he treated, the victim said that they "knew" what they were about to do was wrong. Their subconscious was telling their conscious mind to alter their behaviour. This made a real impression on me because I too have had the same premonitions. The article made me really listen to those inner thoughts then and now.

    Immediately after reading that article I took a red felt tip pen and wrote, on various machines, things like:
    Be Careful
    Don't Be Stupid!
    and
    This machine is tougher than YOU!

    Jeff

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    A couple of days ago I got a reminder as to why it is a good idea to wear gloves when welding, even just a couple of tacks. I have a match head sized hole on the top of one of the fingers of my left hand. I noticed the smoke from it before I felt it. Ouch!
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Eighteen months ago I had my table saw incident, basically due to reason #2 cited by Paul. Cutting a v-groove on a small test piece without proper support or a push stick. I was relatively lucky in that I only cut a small notch in the end of my index finger (although x-rays later showed that I had nicked the bone). I shut off the saw, looked at my finger and realized a band-aid wasn't going to be adequate. When I yelled into the house to my wife that she had better take me to the hospital, the first thing she asked was "Have you got all the bits you cut off?" A trip to Emergency and 3 stitches later and I came home rather chastened. It took me a few days before I could work up the nerve to use the saw again. I still don't have full feeling back in the fingertip, which actually serves as a constant reminder to be more careful.
    Mine was #3 + being very tired (building the front door for the house we'd already moved into - in mid-December Vermont).

    30 years ago & I still don't have any feeling in the end of that finger.

    I'm still very leery of tablesaws.

    Denise - glad to hear you're OK!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Looks like a lot of us have had close calls too! One that was almost both close and final for me was when I was building the 55' Seimans & Choy catamaran "Antigane" for Jim Dutcher the wild life photographer. I was building a set of blister nacelles to house instruments on the two steering station columns that I had a glued up as teak buckets that I had mounted on a jib in my lathe for turning them into large rings. Of course I was in a hurry and failed to put band clamps on the ends as insurance.
    I was nearly done with the first ring when it exploded and threw teak shrapnel sailing into the air. I felt a slight whisper of wind through my hair and then heard a "thunk" behind me. Upon looking for the piece I found a large teak splinter imbedded into and through the hull of our aluminum work skiff. Lesson learned. I always am as safe as I can be no matter how small or simple the job may be!
    Jay

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Jay.. I've heard the wind and the tunk also when I'm turning stuff on the lathe. Funny I've found segmented turnings less "explosion proof" then dry (or wet) log pieces.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    These days I categorize my power tools as either "carnivores," that will eat me if they get the chance, or "big herbivores," that will kill me just as quickly, but perhaps with a bit more stupidity involved on my part and a lot more danger on their part because it's easy to become complacent.

    Table saw, circular saw: carnivores. Router: serious, velociraptor-grade carnivore (ye gods that thing scares the p*ss out of me!).

    Lathe, bandsaw, drill press, standing belt/disk sander: big herbivores.

    It was due to the drill press and a 2-3/8" forstner bit that the tip of my left index finger now looks like a crazy-quilt and is 1/16" shorter than OEM specs --with the meat removed from the *middle* of the pad, not the tip. "Oh, I'll just shove this bit in and drill this one quick hole; no, no need to change the belts." You know how forstner bits are labled "Max 450 RPM"? Well, what they *really* mean is... "Max 450 RPM." Not 2000 RPM, or whatever speed I was spinning the 1/4" twist bit that I removed to insert the forstner. No, not even for one quick hole at the end of the day. The PA on duty at the ER did a great job of baste-stitching together the remaining bits of meat, then holding the too-small pieces in place around them with a sort of vaseline-impregnated cheesecloth, but when there are pieces missing, they just don't seem to grow back.

    It was after that incident that I began categorizing my tools as carnivores and herbivores. For some reason it has always stuck in my head that the most dangerous of the "Big Five" in big game hunting is the cape buffalo, a big herbivore --and that only two of those Big Five are carnivores. I get laughed at for changing speeds on my drill press with near-religious devotion, but I don't care.

    Alex

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Like a scene from "Final Destination".

    Thus my propensity for hand tools whenever I can get away with them. I've sacrificed my share of blood and (luckily) small meaty bits to the Gods of Power Tools and while I don't feel great fear of them, I hold them with their due respect and their use always creates a certain anxiety. If nothing else simply for their capability of destroying a workpiece in the blink of an eye. I can do just as much damage with hand tools, but at least I can relax and enjoy the process of turning something into firewood.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Thus my propensity for hand tools whenever I can get away with them. I've sacrificed my share of blood and (luckily) small meaty bits to the Gods of Power Tools and while I don't feel great fear of them, I hold them with their due respect and their use always creates a certain anxiety. If nothing else simply for their capability of destroying a workpiece in the blink of an eye. I can do just as much damage with hand tools, but at least I can relax and enjoy the process of turning something into firewood.
    Hugh, and how often do we use a razor sharp chisel and have our other hand of it in line of the cutting edge should it slip? OMG I've had to make a conscious effort to break that habit! I also have carpal tunnel and I'm left-handed LOL

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    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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