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Thread: Osage & Epoxy

  1. #1
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    Default Osage & Epoxy

    Does Osage orange get along with epoxy?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2011
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    My son has made bows (archery) with osage and epoxy. Nary a failure, and if it can take that much extreme flexion and shock it should be able to take anything a boat can serve up.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    Define "epoxy". I'd say G-Flex would work best, depending on what you might be building...bow, biplane, or boat.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    A quick call to the West System tech line will clear up any hesitations you have, and set you in the right direction.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    I laminated Osage in my Coquina using thickened west system. No issues.
    Love working with Osage. It's like machining aluminum it's so hard. With exposure to light it mellows to a really pretty deep Amber.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  6. #6
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    pittsfield nh usa
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    the brittleness of epoxy varies from epoxy to epoxy. Use a less brittle epoxy (clear or pigmented.
    paul oman
    progressive epoxy polymers

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    As Thorne and Paul said, there are a lot of epoxies and not all epoxies are the same. I would add System 3 G-2 to the list of epoxies for difficult to bond woods.
    https://www.systemthree.com/products/g-2-epoxy-glue

    According to the Wood Database, Osage is both a difficult to bond oily hardwood and takes glues well. As rare as errors on that website may be, I think that the comment under workability needs some work. I think that the answer is that with care and the right epoxy, osage orange can be bonded without any unusual problems.
    http://www.wood-database.com/osage-orange/
    Gluing Oily Tropical Hardwoods
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    Thanks to all the replies, Can't call West on Sunday, will try tomorrow. What moisture content do you think I need to get down to with Osage before bonding? My Delmhorst pin meter says I am currently 15-17% after the logs sitting out for 2 years.

    Ken

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    A moisture content optimum range depends upon the application. You haven't given us any details.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Osage & Epoxy

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    A moisture content optimum range depends upon the application. You haven't given us any details.
    The forward post of the centerboard trunk will be about the most well-braced structure in this open boat because it ties into the trunk as well as a bulkhead running the width of the boat. So I am looking at using some serious wood (Osage) for that structure as the forward attachment of a lifting bridle, and maybe by extending it upward, create a convenient midship bollard for tying off anything. I am thinking to glass it on the inside of the trunk along with the rest of the interior of the trunk as I assemble. Does this make sense?

    Ken

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