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Thread: H28 Genesta

  1. #36
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Hi Jim,
    For that cracked frame, I would be inclined to scarf in a new inner cap, that is correctly, pre-bent to the curve. I think, if I were doing it, I might consider riveting it in place as the screws won't produce much draw unless you can brace the laminate well during the glue cure. I also would use G/flex epoxy for this one. A sister frame is less work but I would be re-miss to spoil the lovely look of your framing layout.
    Gotta give you some more kudos for the way you are taking care of your fine little ship!
    Bravo!
    Jay

  2. #37
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    [QUOTE=gypsie;5443878

    PS - my teak overlay on ply; ply has rotted - bit of a job to pull up the whole thing and replace. If i was laying a teak deck, i'd lay ply and glass over it and then glue (not nail/screw) the teak to it. Let the teak delaminate if it wants to, its a much easier to repair that than to pull up a deck. Phil Y - interested to know how you're deck went.[/QUOTE]

    So far life, lack of funds and reluctance to tackle a huge job has gotten in the way. A week or so ago I tore up a couple of small patches of teak where I could see there was rot underneath, cut back to good ply and scarfed in new ply patches.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    This is a great thread. One question. In the first post is a picture of the forepeak when you bought the boat. Is that a marine head perched up there? I admire what you've done with the forepeak, but where is the head?
    Currently doesn't have one..............
    I'm 6ft6 (2m tall) so the head up the front was pretty useless for me as well as the existing bunks. Also I've made the V berth longer than larks (about 1 more frame) and other ones I've seen on here.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by James Chilman View Post
    Hi,
    Yes I need to repair that, Still looking at the best way. It's only cracked through the inside half of the frame. The frames are made up to two pieces of wood laminated together.
    what would be the best and easiest way? tossing up between laminating some this strips of timber to sister the frame, cutting out a plywood one to fit each side of the crack, or just grinding out the crack and filling with fibreglass.
    Generally speaking a sister sits alongside. Best, and not difficult, is to cut out a section of the damaged inner laminate and glue in a new piece of timber, either bent or carved to fit. Cut the old out with a multi tool, chisel or whatever works. Not a difficult job I don't think, you've got great access.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post




    I wonder if that’s through both laminates of the frame or just the visible one? And am wondering if it could be a scarf repair similar to what I’ve seen someone else here do somewhere - i.e. shave back the fame about 2-300mm either side of the crack down to the second laminate, or the hull if need be, nicely tapered to accept a scarfed in piece to be glued/epoxied and fastened to the remaining frame and hull.

    Others may have better ideas, but I expect that this would be sufficient if done properly and would be neater than a sistered frame. If you google scarfed boat frame or boat rib repair you’ll find plenty of examples.

    James, this is something like what I was referring to earlier, but only through the inside most laminate if that’s as far as the crack goes - however I wouldn’t take it down to a V like in this sketch, I’d flatten it out for about 100-200mm with the scarfe's either side:




    Here’s a link to another one from this forum with how he’s done it:
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...irs-first-post

    that link includes a post from Kerry (floating Kiwi) showing the method from



    Last edited by Larks; 01-09-2018 at 08:49 PM.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

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  6. #41
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    That's perfect. I'll give that a go.
    The Boatcoat epoxy I've got from boat craft pacific has a bit of flew in it like the Gflex west systems. It's meant to have been made for use with timber boats and have a little flex before it will break.
    It's great stuff to work with.
    The crack is defiantly only in the top laminate.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Would anyone know the wetted surface area of a H28? I'm going to be slipping the boat for anti foul soon and need to work out how much I'll need.
    The only anti foul which I've found locally which is green is altex no.5. are there any other ones out there which are green?

  8. #43
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    No idea on the wetted surface, but I see Total Boat has a green in a couple of their antifouling paints. It's darker than the "Herreshoff Green", though.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by James Chilman View Post
    Would anyone know the wetted surface area of a H28? I'm going to be slipping the boat for anti foul soon and need to work out how much I'll need.
    The only anti foul which I've found locally which is green is altex no.5. are there any other ones out there which are green?

    James, I estimated to allow roughly 20sqm for antifoul without getting too anal/technical about calculating it....waterline roughly 7.5m, draft @1.2m, less a bit under the bow and the stern, more a bit for the beam/curve under the hull.....

    Have a look at Jotun for colours - I think they have a green close to the H28 green.

    But also have a chat to the guys where your boat is moored to see what types of antifoul are working for them and which aren’t - what is superb in Sydney or Adelaide can be crap up our way in warmer water with different sea life and vice versa, so a complete waste of money when a few dollars more or less may make all the difference. Jotun had been popular around the Gold Coast when I was at Stella marine so I took it that it had been pretty effective in our area. I was given a good supply of Jotun by a friendly owner who had a couple of 20litre tins left over from a large job so I have that in the glory box for my hull (if it doesn’t go off), but I didn’t really research what was working in the area because I wasn’t ready for it and I’ll use what was free first anyway, regardless of how well it works.
    Last edited by Larks; 01-12-2018 at 12:28 AM.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  10. #45
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    It been a bit quite on the boat front over the last month.

    In between working flat out, moving house and sailing with other people I've also started up my own canvas company out of home. so if anyone needs some canvas work done I know a guy.........
    Jimmy's Canvas and Bags on facebook, jchilman5@gmail.com or PM me on here.
    Keeping the business with low overhead I can do a lot of work with simple measure yourself sheet for stuff such as boom covers, keeping the price down.

    I have refinished my tiller, and am most of my way through building a new asymmetric kite for the boat.
    Wynnum Manly Yacht Club host a short handed series which starts this Sunday which I'm entering, so it will be interesting how I go against the other boats.

    Here the tiller getting clear coated at work, I don't have any close up pictures of it ATM.

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Here is the kite, trying to go for a more classic look of the alternating panels with fabric which we had left over from other jobs.

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]


    Practicing a handsewn ring for up coming sails.
    Learnt a fair bit and the next ones will be neater.
    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]



    Glamour sail back across the bay on the Australia Day long weekend (Jan 26th for those not in AUS)
    Sitting on 6knt hitting 7 while towing the dinghy (****ty inflatable with a heap of drag)
    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

  11. #46
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    James, I did rib repairs just like the bottom picture in Gregs post #40, to start, carefully clean putty/paint etc, from rivet head holes in hull (small wire brush, maybe 10mm diam in cordless drill, slow and careful!), holes must be clean! Removed roves with angle grinder to peened part, flip rove off, pin punch rivet out carefully with someone outside with dolly hard against plank until rivet head strikes dolly, then another dolly with hole just big enough for rivet head. Remove rivets at teast 300mm either side of crack. Contour existing rib ends so that there is a continous smooth curve in the 2 scarfs just touching the hull at the former crack. I use angle grinder 24 grit to shape, 80 to finish. I used Karri in 5mm thick strips to lay in, epoxied to each other and the existing rib. Hold in place with a couple of toms and watch while someone outside drill a 1/8 pilot hole and use 8g gyprock screws with large metal washers to pull the Karri strips in to place while the epoxy sets. When set, use angle grinder, 24g/80g to smooth the ends of the strips and then start backing out one screw at a time and replace with rivet and rove. I did this about 60 times on Ghost and most of them under a stringer. There was language, especially when the drill went into the end of the thumb. Not sure what other timber than Karri, Spotted gum? Not Jarrah. Adrian
    the invisible man........

  12. #47
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    So far life, lack of funds and reluctance to tackle a huge job has gotten in the way. A week or so ago I tore up a couple of small patches of teak where I could see there was rot underneath, cut back to good ply and scarfed in new ply patches.
    If possible, I would have strong words with the first person that laid teak over plywood sub decking thinking it was a good idea! Even stronger words would follow if he was the one that advocated doing it for the general boating public to believe in!

    Much safer, much easier and much more elegant is to lay down a straight laid sub deck of quarter inch Alaska Yellow or other appropriate Cedar planks that is detailed by a costom made pair of router bits or a T&G molding plane to make the planks into"1/4" Car Siding" Every time you look at the over head in your boat you will feel good in knowing that the sub deck will not rot! And, every time you look at it it's appearance will please your eye! It can also be covered with a layer of glass or dynel before laying the teak. Then you will have a deck that may even outlast you! " Car Siding" is the name for the T&G siding as it was first used in railway cars.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 02-13-2018 at 01:23 PM.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Hi All,
    It's been a while between posts but a fair amount of progress has been made,
    I've slipped the boat and,
    Filled the seams which needed filling,
    Sanded the hull smooth (smooth but not necessary fair)
    Repainted the hull sides (topsides?) in white enamel
    sanded back the antifoul
    Re antifouled the hull

    When we removed the rudder to clean it up we found that the pintal second from the bottom had broken (the pin was no longer attached)
    It looked like it had been like that for some time, so only the very bottom one was really stopping the rudder from peeling off sideways......

    I also shifted the water line on the hull. I don't think that it had ever been moved? and with the larger motor and 2 x 100L stainless tanks under the cockpit seats she sat a bit stern down in the water.
    Not sure why you would put a 100L tank in a little 28ft sail boat (I can motor over 300nm with out refuelling)

    Overall the hull itself is in pretty good nick, only found one small spot with a bit of rot in it under the chainplate for the mizzen shrouds on the pt side.
    The boat sat straight on it keel in the trolley, it didn't sit on the side arm at all.

    I've also been working on the bright work on the cabin sides and a few other things as well!

    Here are some pictures of the progress.

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]
    I got my Dad hard at work filling in seams in the planks

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]
    I think because the boat sat so long with out moving that the creamy colour (the previous own mixed it himself.....) got quite hot and aided in the shrinking of the planks. It was quite bad when you looked up close

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Here she is with a coat of primer on the sides and bottom of the hull.


    Ready to go back into the water.
    I want to take the transom back to timber and clear it but ran out of time when on the slip (it's great fun trying to paint in between rain showers....)
    You can also see that the hull is smooth but not fair.
    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

  14. #49
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Looks a million times better - well done!

  15. #50
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Looks great.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    If possible, I would have strong words with the first person that laid teak over plywood sub decking thinking it was a good idea! Even stronger words would follow if he was the one that advocated doing it for the general boating public to believe in!

    Much safer, much easier and much more elegant is to lay down a straight laid sub deck of quarter inch Alaska Yellow or other appropriate Cedar planks that is detailed by a costom made pair of router bits or a T&G molding plane to make the planks into"1/4" Car Siding" Every time you look at the over head in your boat you will feel good in knowing that the sub deck will not rot! And, every time you look at it it's appearance will please your eye! It can also be covered with a layer of glass or dynel before laying the teak. Then you will have a deck that may even outlast you! " Car Siding" is the name for the T&G siding as it was first used in railway cars.
    Jay
    No no thanks Jay, it's going to be glass or dynel over ply for me.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Nice job James - what antifoul did you end up using and how did you go on quantity?
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  18. #53
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Outstanding work.

    (and the blue/white alternating kite is a great choice)
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Nice job James - what antifoul did you end up using and how did you go on quantity?
    Used Altex no.5 green.
    I only found that altex and sea hawk available it green. the Alex was $225 for 4L and the sea hawk was going at $380 1 gallon (about 3.8L)
    I got some leftovers from a boatbuilding mate to use as the first layer (about 3.5L), and than the 4L tin of green did one complete coat with enough to do a second coat around the waterline, rudder and base of the keel.
    the first layer is a different colour, my mate recommended it as when the other colour (dk blue in this case) starts showing through it time to reapply.
    I had quite a few spots which had gone through to the primer which where the only spots where the was coral on the boat.
    It's amazing the difference it's made to the boat both motoring and sailing.
    Firstly it motors ,1knt faster (used to motor at 4.8-5.0 now nearly 5.5-5.8, did I mention that the bottom was really bad) and actually turns easier when docking.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    We had our wooden boat festival at Wynnum Manly Yacht Club at the bigining of the month.
    Perfect weather.......... 20-30 knots all weekend.

    We had some good racing in Div 2 with a twister 28 called casuarina. They where quicker up wind (they draw 300mm deeper) and we where quicker downwind.

    We beat them over the line by 15seconds in the first race and they got us by 40 in race 3 (we didn't do race 2)

    It's safe to say that the 50 year old mainsail is on it last legs now. more seams started popping again.

    We got quite a few comments on how the old girl was going. We might be able to drag a few other out of the woodwork for the gaffers regatta at the end of july.

    Here are some pictures.

    [IMG]31948636_226533058115342_7769366306821767168_n by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]32105420_226533411448640_7334813679159869440_n by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]


    [IMG]31946374_226534021448579_989134309753356288_n by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I've been getting quite into the old school sailmaking as well.
    The new jib in the pictures has handsewn corner rings and leather wraps on all the hanks.

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]Untitled by James Chilman, on Flickr[/IMG]

  21. #56
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Nice line position on the start The "Twister" looks a little overpowered...I think I'd have tucked in the first reef and gone for the pointing ability. Great Pics and it looks like a great weekend!

  22. #57
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Nice line position on the start The "Twister" looks a little overpowered...I think I'd have tucked in the first reef and gone for the pointing ability. Great Pics and it looks like a great weekend!
    The second day they sailed with a reef and went better.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Nicely done James, she’s looking sweet on the water there:

    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  24. #59
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Jay, you'll have competition soon if he keeps making improvements like this. Looking great James. Keep us informed as you improve her. Just so Jay remains motivated enough to keep Bright Star's thread update as well. Nothing like friendly healthy competition eh?
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  25. #60
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Thanks for the comment Sailor. We are working on "Bright Star" right now, installing a new Beta 16 diesel in place of the worn out Universal Atomic 20 what bit the dust with a perforated water jacked inspite of being set up with a heat exchanger!

    James, Your boat looks primo! I do like the white topsides on "Genesta" better than the old ivory! I also like the H28 with the ketch rig better than the sloop rig! We are planning to build a new mast for "Bright Star", as the old main has been spliced too many times. The former owner would sail the boat in heavy airs with a masthead Genoa and broke the main mast three times. It now looks like a patch work quilt! We will be using the sloop mast design which is four feet taller for the new rig but will be keeping the mizzen. Right now whe have running backs on the main to suport the jib stay. They do improve the performance to weather! We plan to add a set to the mizzen as well which will allow a mizzen asemetrical chute to be flown in conjunction with a big asem. off the main. We can't fly big mast head sails unless we were to add a set of jumper struts to take the bow out of the upper third of the stick. But, the new running backs do help a lot when working up wind.

    Jay

  26. #61
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Yeh, the white looks a lot better than the old colour. It was a home made mix of white and beige........ It just never looked clean.
    What colour do you have your decks painted? I'll be doing that later in the year and am still not sure what colour to use.

    I seem to have the problem of everytime it try to race my boat it is 20knts...... I do really like the ketch over the sloop but.

    On the Sunday of the wooden boat regatta we flew the mizzen and mizzen staysail on the run as I had left the kite at home.......
    I'd been thinking about putting runners on the mizzen before hand and definatly will now. It's amazing how much pull those little sails have. (I was strugling to hold onto the 4mm VB cord sheet) My dad who was driving commented on how much easier it was to helm once the staysail was put up. just the mizzen was screwing around the transom a fair bit.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Our H28"Bright Star" has raw teak decks that contrast well with the color of the coach roof that is about the same as yours. Yours look fine as they are! That golden ivory is a pretty traditional color for what you are using it for. If you wanted a color that is close to teak and gives less glare, Grand Banks Beige is an alternative but I do like that golden ivory! I have found that in a blow, our boat goes better with a reef tucked in the main and the mizzen left up when going to weather and on a close reach. We don't usually fly a masthead Genoa in winds that heavy as it puts a hell of a strain on the upper mast sections. As mentioned, the former owner broke the main mast three times doing just that. A set of jumpers would really help. Leaving the jib stay in place and adding the running backs is what we did. But on the wind it is still iffy!

    If you have not seen this, here is a video of our son Jaime and his pal Dan who ditched their work and wives and went sailing in a heavy Santa Ana blow off of S. CA. it is gusting to nearly thirty but the boat is balanced to finger tip control on the helm. The water is blown flat and the boat is hitting 8+kts! Sloppy reef due to missing gear but it works! The main running back tackles can be seen in a couple of shots.
    Jay
    https://vimeo.com/2816887
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-24-2018 at 01:37 PM.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Hi Jay,
    I should go back through your thread to find pictures of your rigs, do you have side stays running to the jib stay as well?
    I have two lowers running to the base ( one forward one aft) of the spreader and one cap shroud to the masthead.
    Mine doesn't have any side stays or back stays going to the jib stay which was one of the reasons I took it off.
    My rig is not as per the original drawings. The tip is quite chunky and does not taper as much as it should. And the caps, forestay and back stays all come off the top of the mast.
    At our club this is another H28 which was built by the same builder but launch 2 years earlier. This boat dose have the mast and rigging as designed. I wonder if the boat builder changed how they did it later when they built my boat. I do believe this boat has had it's mast break before.

    I do need to set up reefing lines and want to try running a reefed main with a mizzen to see how it feels, currently without the mizzen and full main the boat is very balanced. I do get weather helm with the mizzen up up range but I think that is as much me pulling the sails on too hard to try to point higher (dam racing background).
    Do you have the clew reefing line lead along the boom to the gooseneck?

    The next sails I make will be a new mainsail and mizzen. The main would be 50 years old and I've already had a go at re-cutting once it but it's stretching out again and the mizzen is a bit light weight (made out of scrap fabric) and it doesn't have any reefing points. But I do want a new prop like your shiny new one.....

    As always thanks for you insight!!

  29. #64
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    James, Yes we do have a clew reefing line running along the boom on a track that gives a 2:1 purchase. The sail can be reefed while sanding at the mast by one person. After that a lacing line is run throught the reef point crinkles as the crew member works aft. Takes about two minutes for the whole operation to be done. I also have a set of 3:1 halyard blocks I made up from LFH's notes that eliminate the need for halyard winches. As a result, it only takes one person to either raise, reef or lower the sails. The only change in the rig, so far, was to add the running back stays and the halyard blocks. You can see in the photo that the runners support the mast in the way of the jib stay but the top of the stick needs a set of jumpers to give latteral support on a diagonal load. That is where the load can cause mast failure if flying a masthead genoa, spinnaker or asemetrical chute in brisk winds. So, the new sloop mast will have a set of jumpers as well as running backs.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-24-2018 at 06:30 PM.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Here is the new set of tangs that are designed to take an Amsteel running backstay on either side at the attachment of the jib stay. Amsteel is a synthetic fiber that is now being used in place of stainless wire rigging. It is extremely light and is not affected by UV. All, including the copy of the Merriman block were made up in my home shop. The metal is Everdure and the shieves are made of Delrin with a sintered bronze bearing insert. This stuff is simple to make up but you will need a small lathe to make the shieves and bearings.
    Jay

  31. #66
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    James, so as not to hijack Jay’s thread, here’s a version of a galvanic table worth looking at. Although on Jay’s thread Paul G has never heard of copper antifouling eating a stainless shaft or bronze struts, this sort of electrolysis from the galvanic action between the copper in the antifoul, the stainless steel and bronze is indeed a quite real and regular occurrence and I could tell you of quite a few instances of replacing shafts, struts, props and nuts that I have had to deal with when managing a commercial marine engineering business.

    Whether or not there were any "complicating factors”, it doesn’t take much for galvanic action to have an effect, especially where there is no sacrificial anode present, and you will more likely than not soon have pitting in your shaft, prop and strut.

    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  32. #67
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Are you saying dont use copper antifouling? That's kind of out there isn't it?

  33. #68
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Are you saying dont use copper antifouling? That's kind of out there isn't it?
    Of course not, just not quite like this:

    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  34. #69
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    Nov 2004
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    James, I see I failed to clearly answer your question about the shrouds on "Bright Star" so here is more input for you. The rig is as LFH designed it except that running backs are added to the main mast. The upper shroud leads to a point about three feet below the masthead and the single after lower shroud attaches at the spreader tang. This leaves the upper portion of the mast unsupported athwart ships and is the point where the masthead genoa overloaded the spar and caused the mast breaking. It should be noted that L Francis designed it only to have a light air drifter flown from the masthead. The reason for not running the upper to the masthead is that a "Column en Castrae" when loaded from the top will bow out at a point about ten percent below the top. This is why masthead rigs need so much extra beef in the upper area of the mast. So Herreshoff put the upper shroud where it belongs for the design of the rig. As I mentioned before, the sloop mast we are making will carry a set of veed jumper struts that land at the point where the mast would bow and break. I look forward to this change, as we are not able to carry a masthead chute at this time due to this problem with the rig.

    Again, L. Francis, purposely, designed the H28 as a simple week-end cruising boat that is simply rigged and easy to sail! He did have a compression strut designed for the mizzen that ties into the after end of the cockpit. But this is usually omitted because it is difficult to get ones feet past when shifting from one side to the other on different tacks. The fact that the H28 is such an amazingly and versatile performing little cruiser is probably the reason why over two thousand of them have been built! You and I are fortunate to own a couple of them!
    Jay

  35. #70
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    Apr 2010
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    Default Re: H28 Genesta

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Of course not, just not quite like this:

    Id want to see a zinc on the shaft, and on the hull. But I think plenty of owners use anti foul on their props and shafts. I've seen plenty of debate about whether it works in terms of stopping growth, vs things like prop speed, virgin olive oil beeswax etc. Absent other factors, like stray Marina currents etc, is antifouling on the prop really an issue in terms of galvanic corrosion?
    Last edited by Phil Y; 05-25-2018 at 06:24 PM.

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