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Thread: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Mulino, OR
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    Default Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Not sure I'm in the correct area, so if I'm not please move me if needed. Thanks

    So I went by an older guys house about a year ago to look at a classic car he was selling and I noticed he has a 32 Christ Craft runabout in this container. I looked the boat over and it's not in bad shape. I have never been into boats, but this one really caught my eye. I saw him the other day and he would like to sell it, but wants 10k for it. It needs some repairing and from what I know about cars, there is always more to fixing them than meets the eye. One of the reasons I'm interested, is because I enjoy working on things, but I don't know the processes to rebuilding boats and I'm worried I would be into it to deep. The price seems a little high, but in the long run I'm sure a few thousand would not make a difference.

    I would like to know what decent projects go for and then I can go in with a starting price that's reasonable. I wish I had some pictures to show you, but I don't. If anyone has a good place for me to look at prices for one of these, that would be great. Like I said, I'm just looking to gather some information prior to going to see it.

    Thanks for your time and help,
    Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
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    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    ...somewhere between "negative zillion dollars and fort knox."
    Without photos and a better description ... can't say.
    But "32 foot runabout " sounds hinky from the git go.
    "Some repairing"...can you elaborate? Scratched varnish or rotted out bottom?
    bruce

  3. #3
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    Oct 2008
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Mulino, OR
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    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    The boat is I think 15' long and it's year is 1932.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Mulino, OR
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    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Hi Bruce. The boat is a 1932 15' runabout. The boat looks pretty good at first glance, but then I can see a little soft wood near the lower section. It's not horrible, but I know how things can just get bigger. All the trim is on the boat, but would need redone. The engine is original to the boat, but is currently out of it. There is also another engine that goes with it. The seats are all there, but will also need restored. If you have any other questions, let me know and I will try to remember from seeing last year.
    Steve

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    S.W. Florida
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    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Welcome. You will have to post pictures to get more than general advice. Here's how (from the faq)--

    POSTING PICTURES -- Don't use Photobucket!
    Control yourself. Avoid posting BIG pictures. Keep them 500 pixels wide OR LESS. That way the dial-up folks aren't bogged-down, and the width doesn't make the page hard to read in a standard sized window. If you don't have Photoshop, try the freebie from gimp.org. We do NOT host your images. You need to have a place like Flickr, Imagestation, Photobucket, DropBox, or one of the free other hosting outfits... or your own site. Per Thorne's 'How-to', here's how to post photos on this forum: ...FIRST - Don't attach photos. Only a tiny version will display. ...SECOND - Post the photos on the web. Use your own website or a free image hosting service like www.flickr.com, picasaweb.google.com, picturetrail, photobucket, etc. Images posted on Facebook must be set to "Public" access via the Edit option, not limited to "Friends". ...THIRD - Once posted on the web, right-click the photo to "Copy Image Location", or drag the photo to another browser window, then copy the image URL (web address) which will end in ".jpg". You can test by pasting the photo URL into the location field (http://* ) of a web browser and see if the photo displays. Remember that this process will not work for photos located just on your computer, on members-only Yahoo groups, or on Facebook unless set to "Public" view. (In Flickr - You usually have to first click the photo to bring up the black-framed viewer, then click the "View All Sizes" link near the top right. Then you can get the image URL by right-clicking the image. Alternately you can go to the Actions menu on the upper left, then select "View All Sizes". ...FOURTH - DO THIS EVERY TIME TO POST IMAGES IN THREADS: A. In any "Reply" window you can click the "insert image" icon --> a little yellow square icon with a dot at each corner, a tiny tree in the center. Depending on browser version and Reply/Edit status, this may bring up a simple window with a field to paste the URL into, or the "Add an Image" window described below. B. If the window titled "Add an Image" comes up, click the "From URL" tab, paste the URL of the photo in the field, deselect the box for "Retrieve remote file and reference locally", then click the "INSERT IMAGE" button. The Forum software will resize some large images, so look at your post to see the actual displayed images.

    PS - You should know that BOAT stands for Break Out Another Thousand.
    Good Luck!

    .
    .

    “What use is a house if you haven’t got a tolerable planet to put it on?”


    ~~~ Henry David Thoreau

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
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    1,916

    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Did you search on this forum and boatdesign.com for threads on restoring Chris Craft?

    Had a friend with a big one. He put in 3 years of patching the bottom (4 different spots), got skin cancer from working on it, and finally sold it for a couple of thousand.

    I think the engines/ hardware was pulled out and it was burned.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
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    11,293

    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Given the boat's age, it's probably in the "classic" class. These boats weren't built to last for long. She's far beyond her "use by" date. There's no such thing as "a little soft wood." If it's soft, it's rotten. The entire piece needs to be replaced. Depending on the hull construction method, that can be a tedious, and expensive process. They didn't take the engine out for exercise. There's something seriously wrong with it that required bench work. If somebody bought the "parts engine" or "replacement engine" to go with it, well.... we're not just talking about replacing spark plugs. If the engine isn't original to the boat, her "classic" value drops. If the engine isn't the same type as the original, the classic boat's value drops even more. If a classic is to have the sort of value one sees asked in the advertisements, all the fittings will need to be rechromed or perhaps even replicated in order to attain that "showroom floor" look. We have no idea if the boat is a rare and highly desirable model or a rather common one built in large numbers, so there's no way to gauge her potential value as restored. Having her properly restored professionally could easily exceed the value of the boat by two or three times. There's no way to say, "Buy it!" or "Don't!" but there aren't a lot of boats that size selling for ten grand with "a little bit of soft wood" and the engine out of them unless you are talking about a contemplated total restoration. Chris Crafts weren't exactly known for the quality of their construction compared to their contemporaries, but some rare models do bring high prices when restored. (See: http://sierraboat.com/boats/featured...aft-20-custom/) Those asking prices often are much less than what it cost to restore the boat, so don't let the dollar signs go to your head.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Mulino, OR
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    Given the boat's age, it's probably in the "classic" class. These boats weren't built to last for long. She's far beyond her "use by" date. There's no such thing as "a little soft wood." If it's soft, it's rotten. The entire piece needs to be replaced. Depending on the hull construction method, that can be a tedious, and expensive process. They didn't take the engine out for exercise. There's something seriously wrong with it that required bench work. If somebody bought the "parts engine" or "replacement engine" to go with it, well.... we're not just talking about replacing spark plugs. If the engine isn't original to the boat, her "classic" value drops. If the engine isn't the same type as the original, the classic boat's value drops even more. If a classic is to have the sort of value one sees asked in the advertisements, all the fittings will need to be rechromed or perhaps even replicated in order to attain that "showroom floor" look. We have no idea if the boat is a rare and highly desirable model or a rather common one built in large numbers, so there's no way to gauge her potential value as restored. Having her properly restored professionally could easily exceed the value of the boat by two or three times. There's no way to say, "Buy it!" or "Don't!" but there aren't a lot of boats that size selling for ten grand with "a little bit of soft wood" and the engine out of them unless you are talking about a contemplated total restoration. Chris Crafts weren't exactly known for the quality of their construction compared to their contemporaries, but some rare models do bring high prices when restored. (See: http://sierraboat.com/boats/featured...aft-20-custom/) Those asking prices often are much less than what it cost to restore the boat, so don't let the dollar signs go to your head.
    Thanks Bob, this is kind of what I was looking for. I have restored many a classic car and they are never cheap if done correctly. I'm not really looking for one that's done or even started. I was thinking if I can get the boat for a reasonable price it would be a long term project/hobby. I'm not sure of the rarity of the boat, but maybe with some help I could see if it's special or not when I go to look at it again. In my head I'm thinking it's going to need to be gone through from top to bottom, but maybe I will be surprised. I just really liked the look of the boat and I think they are beautiful when done.
    Thanks,
    Steve

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Marblehead MA
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    2,702

    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Bob makes a really good point. If you love the type of boat and the lines, find one that is in good shape and buy it.

    Somewhere there is someone who loved the same type of boat, has one, and has taken good care of it. That person would love to sell to another guy who will keep the boat in great shape and love it.

    Find that boat and be happy.

    Also, find you local antique and classic boat society chapter. Contact one of the officers and get them to bring you to a show and talk boats. You'll have a great time. You'll learn a lot. You'll make a smart decision.
    Yachting, the only sport where you get to be a mechanic, electrician, plumber and carpenter

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
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    5,170

    Default Re: Hi, I'm new to this site and to boats. Thinking of buying a 32 Chris Craft.

    Is she a "utility" (open boat with engine box) or a "speed boat" (decked over with cockpits)?
    She would be built with 'standard' Chris Craft construction, double planked bottom (45 degree inner, cotton canvas, longitudinal outer) and batten seam sides. At a very minimum she probably needs to be flipped and have her bottom redone. There are a couple of different schools and philosophies as to what type of bottom to put back on (decision would be yours). They are simple little boats.

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