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Thread: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

  1. #1
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    Default Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Man, those sails are FLAT!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    We used to have this discussion at the boat shop during the lunch break or perhaps a "safety break" and it always came around to this...
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2607445/

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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Lmao! Thank you Jake!
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    I've always thought that these blade-shaped mains are an interesting challenge to traditional slot effect discussions:


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    That boat is a freak though.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    I've always thought that these blade-shaped mains are an interesting challenge to traditional slot effect discussions:

    I thought that sail configuration was made to be compliant to early 1970s IOR rules.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    I thought that sail configuration was made to be compliant to early 1970s IOR rules.
    I have no idea. I wasn't commenting on motivation. I see that and I think the main is little more than a trim tab for the genoa.

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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    OP sails looked like they are carved. WOW.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    At the risk of bringing down the wrath of most of the forum on my head, it could be said that improvements in rig design and sailcloth over recent decades have cemented the place of the fractional sloop rig as by far the most efficient and easily-handled rig, all else being equal. Even if you don't go as far as the J's sails, you can get such low-stretch cloth that you can go from zero to 20 knots+ just by tweaking a couple of control lines. The jib no longer has to stretch and become a bag; the main can go pretty much as flat as you want with just a tweak of the backstay.

    I put a second-hand film/carbon sail on my 28'er. You can easily just blade it off as the wind meter climbs. No reefing, no flapping - just easing off the 4mm inhaul line a few inches. And in some types of sailing craft you can actually feel the reduced drag of modern flat film sails quite dramatically, and see their effect on your performance.

    The cost of my two second-hand film/carbon sail was something like 1/3 of the cost of a new dacron cruising sail, and unlike earlier years when the first such technology was said to be called 3DL because it had a 3 Day Life, people are now getting years out of some forms of modern sailcloth even when racing. Although it's taken longer, it could be as big as the change from cotton sails to dacron in some ways. They are not all perfect; one of my OD dinghies switched from dacron to mylar and string and the new sails stay fast for longer bu then go from being a training/club racing sail to being thrown away almost overnight; but it's certainly a significant change.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Oh, and on the topic; the slot has been discussed by people like Tom Speer (Boeing wing designer, America's Cup wing designer); Mikko Brummer (sailmaker and CFD guru) and I think Mark Drela (MIT professor, AC wing designer, world record holder) over on Boat Design forum. Modern CFD etc seems to be moving the state of knowledge along pretty well.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris249 View Post
    At the risk of bringing down the wrath of most of the forum on my head, it could be said that improvements in rig design and sailcloth over recent decades have cemented the place of the fractional sloop rig as by far the most efficient and easily-handled rig, all else being equal.
    As an unrepentant dinghy sailor, I have to say that I love the fractional rig. The ability to bend the mast is incredibly advantageous. It may be problematic on larger rigs, but for what I sail it is everything.

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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    It's pretty much the bees knees for racing up to and over 100 footers, too.

    Many people here would call it less attractive than other rigs aesthetically, but if we go back to when it was new we can find enthusiastic accounts of how much prettier it was than gaff or gunter. Like the fact that the clipper bow and the classic "spoon bow" looked hideous to a generation who had grown up on plumb stem boats, it shows how our aesthetics are largely a creation of our culture and biases.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    My asthetic has changed dramatically over the years going from a Spritsail, to a Lugsail, and finally to a fractional rigged jib headed main as the "good one". Nathanial and LFH can take much of the credit. Traditional, 1925-ish?
    "What works good, is good."







    LFH sailing his father's S boat in 1920


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    Default Re: Has there been a definitive discussion of the slot here, ever?

    I like the shot of three S-boats with flexing masts.I seem to remember that when the British Shearwater catamaran class allowed the prescribed sail area to be distributed as the owner wished,the small jib/big main end of the spectrum was the fast choice.

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