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Thread: Meg's Leeboards

  1. #1
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    Default Meg's Leeboards

    Here we have Dave cleaning up after a little epoxy work. Dave's a big guy so you can readily see how big the leeboard is. At least the width. Given the perspective, it's 12' length is not so obvious.


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Impressive bit of woodworking, Ian - a great job by folks familiar with what they are doing !!

    Rick

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Quite the piece of wood!!! How thick will they be when finished??

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    That is, without a doubt, the largest foil we've seen shaped on this Forum!!
    Why the inlaid blocks of ply at the pivot end? Do I see a strip of wood laminated on the top edge to cover end grain? A nice piece of work.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Not inlay. A step down so that the hardware fits flush.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Fitting the leeboards. (FirstLight photo)


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Here it is mostly mounted. I've not got all the parts for my latest redesign of the lifting tackle so we've got the boards trussed high for now. Normally they will be lifted to just above the waterline. The teak strip is for the board to rest against when down. It's short enough that the lifting pennant will hang behind it and not be abused while sailing. I need to make a short wedge to buttress the board at it's tip when up. It sticks out a good 8" from the hull and I don't want it to be subject to unfair strains when against a dock. Once set up, think giant fenderboards.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    ^ Some Thames barges also hang a fender chock in front of the head of the board.


    Whilst some Dutch boats have them welded on.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Interesting work. Assymmetrical foils are so effective. Frank

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Great job Ian! Looking forward to the sailing pictures.
    Jarndyce and Jarndyce

    The Mighty Pippin
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    Dragon KA93

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Ian,

    Are those babies solid ply? Look that way. Are they sheathed with a cloth of some kind? Curious, is all.

    I just made a single leeboard for my boat. Well, remade. I did a ply foil, but I just hated it so much, so I remade it from laminated solid wood.
    It was harder to fair without the cheater lines.

    I really, really like this boat. She is one of the objects I hope to see if I ever get over that side again.

    Peace,
    Robert

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Solid ply. Saw no reason to glass them.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Solid ply. Saw no reason to glass them.
    Sweet. Thank you. Curious is all, as I said. If I listen to enough people answer enough questions, I may eventually learn something.

    They sure do make her look nice. The hardware looks lovely, too, by the by.

    Peace,
    Robert

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    How are things coming Ian? Have not heard a progress report in a while. How soon will you be sailing, or will sailing trials wait till spring?

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    I seem to recall that the boards on another Golden Ball proved to be too short. Are these as drawn or longer Ian?
    Jay

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    These are pretty much as designed. We experimented with the notion of a foil most effective at 4- 6 knots but the bulge would have required redesigning the hinge. Over time, I will experiment.

    Progress of late has been slow for many reasons having nothing to do with the project or the boat yard.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    I am impressed Ian! Wishing you good fortune whith that which is one of my favorite designs!
    Jay

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    HI Jay (and Ian) Re: Too short Leeboards- you may be thinking of the learning curve from Meadowlark #1, Bobby Gibbs' Loon. Built in 1952 (I think) at Bucky Barlow's, Pocasset, Mass. After trials LFH advised to lengthen "Leaboards" one foot. Also could lean the stem out one foot thereby adding one foot to foot of the jib and adding some flare to topsides forward. These were done to subsequent Meadowlarks, especially Alan Vaitses who built several shortly after Loon for the community at head of Buzzards Bay. The communications are in letters between Vaitses and LFH in Mystic Seaports collection. I learned the story from the principles. Loon got the new longer leeboards and the originals went to "Country Boy", a leeboard catboat cabin skiff built by Bucky for Norman Vickery of Mansfield and Pocasset , Mass. One of those leeboards is now a coffee table! Cheers/JC

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Are they designed to be ply?
    Just seems weak , as half the grain is going in the wrong direction ....and all that.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Thanks JC. That info has been in the back of my mind for many years. You have solved the mystery for me. You probably have noted that Skipper transposed the labeling of the boards on the drawings as well. Might have been a bit of "Good New England Rum" in that one!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 11-03-2017 at 12:44 PM.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Ian,

    What sort of window-ports are those?

    Dave

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    I think leeboards built of sandwich layers of plywood, well sheathed with glass would be amply strong. my own boards are built up with 2"x2" strips glued and fastened together. ( that is 2" full dimension). they have been strong enough in service. I graved in a few small bits a couple of years ago where I had a tiny bit of rot.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Meg's Leeboards

    Dave, they are what I call Bahamian ports. Very simple. They are 1/4" lexan that slide in tracks on the outside of the hull. Very simple. Very strong. No leaks.

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