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Thread: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

  1. #176
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    We left Olympia right after the Fair started packing up at 5PM on Sunday. We took a leisurely trip up to Eagle Island where we snatched a buoy for the night...

    IMG_3965 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    IMG_3988 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    IMG_3982 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    It was so nice to enjoy some of the fruits of the last several months' labors. But, as always, we added more than a few things to our to-do list. For now though, we're exhausted...
    Last edited by RainierHooker; 05-14-2018 at 07:05 PM. Reason: grammar

  2. #177
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Yeah, I’m not jealous at all.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
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  3. #178
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Great to get a bit of balance between work and play. It can be a challenge.

  4. #179
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    got to Olympia shortly after 10 AM Friday .......check out the boats and had to leave 12:45 - had to get my daughter to the airport.
    Something about boat in motion - this coming sailboat was a site to see

    Olympia.jpg
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
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  5. #180
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Sorry we missed you 2dogsnight, we didn't quite get the push from the tide that we were hoping for. Glad you got to see some boats though. The Schooner Red Jacket is a really nice old boat. She's our neghbor, and occupies the end-tie on Duffy's home dock.

  6. #181
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Fantastic thread.

    Restoring a boat and its systems while you're using it is the hardest way to go about the job, but you do learn what needs fixing. For the first few years every cruise is interrupted by something you thought was going to be good for awhile. At some point you realize you've replaced the whole boat except for the parts that still need replacing. Boats are only about the journey because the destination is always on the horizon.

    As a former serial Monk restorer I'm enjoying this thread thoroughly.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  7. #182
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Thanks Lew,

    The question of whether to do a restoration gradually while still using the boat, or just going all-in at once is something that one could wax poetic about and waffle over to the end of time. I have concluded (mostly) that for someone like me, of limited means, and with another full time job, the gradual approach is probably better. While the end result may be more time and money spent, the immediate impacts are less of a blow. And, how many vessels have been taken on a one-way-haul only to have their owners succumb to burnout, terminal loss of interest, and then the boat falls finally to the butcher's knife.

    I've got a huge, ever growing, but not insurmountable to-do-list, but these weekend jaunts keep my head in the game and interest peaked. As a helicopter mechanic for over a decade and a half, I've come to accept uphill battles...

  8. #183
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Beautiful!
    I would certainly vote for your approach of a balance between working on her any enjoying her. I had to do the other approach because of the condition when I started, ...... I just wish my wife understood that just because she is in the water now doesn't mean she is finished. (yea, ... lol)

  9. #184
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Great photos! She looks amazing at anchor.

    It it seems like there is ALWAYS a to do list when it comes to boats, more so on wooden ones. Even if it was brand new it would need maintenance every year, varnish, haul out, leak repairs, etc. I love seeing those old Monk designs out on the water.

  10. #185
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by RainierHooker View Post
    Thanks Lew,

    The question of whether to do a restoration gradually while still using the boat, or just going all-in at once is something that one could wax poetic about and waffle over to the end of time. I have concluded (mostly) that for someone like me, of limited means, and with another full time job, the gradual approach is probably better. While the end result may be more time and money spent, the immediate impacts are less of a blow. And, how many vessels have been taken on a one-way-haul only to have their owners succumb to burnout, terminal loss of interest, and then the boat falls finally to the butcher's knife.

    I've got a huge, ever growing, but not insurmountable to-do-list, but these weekend jaunts keep my head in the game and interest peaked. As a helicopter mechanic for over a decade and a half, I've come to accept uphill battles...
    We did Rita as an ongoing project for years. Some years were better than others. If we had a transmission problem in the Gulf Islands, or if tankage wasn't as sound as I thought, we could really have an adventure on our vacation. Loosing a reefer, radio, whatever, you can work around those but some things are fundamental to progress and safety. Sure, it sucks when you loose the ice cream too, it's just not as tragic!

    Few people ever buy one of these thinking they're going to put it in the yard and get 'er done and go boating in luxury 18 months later. We buy them to use them and they just get one of two possible ends. They improve or they go down hill. Like you said, nothing about them from their galvanized boat nails to their economy of construction was intended to last 65 years. My experience as a Monkey (and mine was a pre war boat) was that in the end, nothing could be left undone or to chance if I really wanted to get further than Nanaimo. You have the right spirit, if you don't mind my saying so.
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 05-15-2018 at 12:25 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  11. #186
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    I couldn't agree more Lew. I went into this knowing that it was going to be an ongoing battle, and she was going to end up like the proverbial Norwegian hammer. All original, but had the head replaced four times, the handle replaced five times, but still original. Thankfully, the vast majority of Duffy's structure and systems are sound, but that only extends the time until their replacement comes necessary.

    I think we can get the decks through another year or two with paint, but I'm going to start hoarding canvas for their eventual replacement...
    I've found a decent local source for AYC that I'll be using for the eventual planks that will need tending to...
    I've got several more boxes of fasteners that should suffice to feed that insatiable appetite...
    I just spent a silly amount of money on an equally silly amount of marine wire and terminals to address some gremlins...

    ...at least I won't ever be burdened with bordom

  12. #187
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    My next big-ish project is going to be a rewire of the vessel, and in getting ready for that I'm going to try to bring the bridge control station back to its original appearance. Here's where I get to be a bit nerdy and utilize some of my classic-car and hot rod knowledge...

    Originally Duffy was powered by a Chrysler Crown Six, and the 1950 Chrysler Marine Catalog shows the instrument panel that came with their powerplants:

    4 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    That panel was made by the Stewart Warner Corporation for about twenty years with slight variation. It was referred to as a "Navigator" panel, and was marketed towards hot-rodders, truck and equipment manufacturers, and of course boat builders. Here's their 1948 catalog:

    1948 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  13. #188
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    With that I found a solution to two problems; I found a Navigator panel full of 1957-dated 12v gauges...

    Dash by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    The gauges are what I need for my '39 Ford as it currently has 6v gauges in it and with the engine swap, it will be getting converted to 12v. The fact that the gauges match the year of the Chevy motor is a bonus. This style of gauge (Large "SW" in a block, with "coffin" needles, and convex glass) was only made in 1957 and 1958).

    The panel is a match to the late-40s through late-50s Navigators and has one of the five types of trim plate offered when Duffy was built. They made an "engine turned" aluminum, a chrome steel "basket-weave", an artificial mahogany, black wrinkle-paint finish, and a ribbed anodized aluminum with polished highlights. Mine is the latter. While I try and hunt down and horse-trade from some good late-40s to early-50s type gauges, the instruments that are already in Duffy will suffice.

    So here we go with cutting up some perfectly good mahogany...

    IMG-3878 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    This should be a nice small project to tackle in the evenings after the kids go to bed.
    Last edited by RainierHooker; 05-15-2018 at 03:35 PM.

  14. #189
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Way cool! Love the gauges. I miss good old fashioned gauges.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  15. #190
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    As far as gauges, I have a few options that would fall within the realm of "correct" without knowing exactly what gauges Duffy was launched with. During the late 1940s, the majority of Stewart Warner products came with what are often referred to as "tulip needle" or "smooth bezel" gauges:

    NOS-Stewart-Warner-Oil-Pressure-Gauge-Crescent-Needle.jpg

    ...these are some of my favorite gauges. Stewart Warner primarily marketed them as an "industrial" quality instrument, and they made them from the 1930s through at least the early 1960s. The downside is that other than the ammeter, they were all mechanical, which makes use on a boat problematic. I can't imagine the headache of 50 feet of capillary tube and cables running from the con back to the engine. Also, they never made a 12 volt voltmeter in this series.

    The other option are referred to as "wings" gauges, even though they weren't called that by the S.W. Corp.

    wings.jpg

    These were SW's "deluxe" offering from about 1947 until the "Big Logo" gauges (which were in my panel) came out in 1956. These usually command a premium because of their limited time of manufacture, and the fact that they were a go-to item for hot-rodders at the time. These were offered with electric-senders and so are ideal for a boat with a lot of space between the panel and the powerplant. Finding them in 12v is difficult, but not impossible.

    Of the two, I prefer the look of the tulip needles, but the practicality and ease of installation of the wings gauges. We'll see what I come up with...
    Last edited by RainierHooker; 05-15-2018 at 03:35 PM.

  16. #191
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by RainierHooker View Post
    Sorry we missed you 2dogsnight, we didn't quite get the push from the tide that we were hoping for. Glad you got to see some boats though. The Schooner Red Jacket is a really nice old boat. She's our neghbor, and occupies the end-tie on Duffy's home dock.
    well, Port Townsend festival is coming up, I should be able to get a day off , most likely you are going to be there.
    Eagle Island is close to Lakebay - just trough the Pitt Passage. Great pictures!!
    Great looking gages!
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  17. #192
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    My semi-regular mid-commute stop resulted in the start of deck painting...

    IMG-4026 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    IMG-4035 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    I went with Kirby's "Green Tint" to try and cool things down, literally. Last year we found the interior of the boat to be almost unbearable in the direct summer sun and this past week I actually burned the bottom of one of my feet when I walked barefoot on the dark-sea-green painted decks and cabin tops. You could probably fry an egg on those things. hopefully a lighter color at least takes the edge off.

    The decks were due for a coat of paint anyway, and if this can make them last just one more season that'd be a huge help too.

  18. #193
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Nice green, should help with the heat...

  19. #194
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Love the new color!
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Since we are talking about decks and colors and decks and stuff...

    IMG-4039 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    ...I'd like some options and opinions on the cockpit decks. At present, they are three panels, the two on the sides hinge upward and outboard, the center lifts out. They are just 5/8" (or thereabouts) plywood, braced behind with fir, and have small battens over the edges. They are just painted grey and there are outdoor carpets that lay on top of them.

    They are functional, but not especially visually appealing. The center is a bit unwieldy due to its size and weight, and the battens keep coming loose every time I open or close the outboard sections.

    I think the plan is going to be to remake the center into two lift-out sections to reduce the individual sizes and heft. I'll leave the sides as is, but I need to come up with a better solution to the battens. As to the carpet, I want to get rid of it, but that would just leave plain plywood, so I was thinking of canvasing them to match the rest of the decks. Since these things get a lot of traffic, and will be subject to regular beatings, I though of maybe trying dynel and epoxy instead of canvas.

    Then comes paint color for the cockpit floors. I could just carry on the new green color from the decks, but I was also thinking of something more interesting as a contrast. Maybe red? Taupe? Russet? Bear in mind that these are engine decks, and may be subject to dirty hands or oily rags from time to time.

    If you have any opinions or suggestions on any of the above, I'm all ears!

  21. #196
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    I'd go with dynel & epoxy for ruggedness. Color is a tough one, but I'm thinking (this is my opinion & worth every penny you've paid for it! ) that adding a new color could be jarring. Right now it seems to match the cabin top? If you want to go lighter maybe 1/2 way between the dark green & your new deck color? Darker will certainly hide dirt better...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    The cabin tops will be going the same light green as the decks due to the heat issue more than anything. That will also reduce the number of colors in use. The carpet pieces in there now are black which certainly hides messes, but again gets somewhat hot (I like boating barefoot). I was thinking of a reddish hue, maybe close to the russet-red-brown cushions back there, to break up the monotony of white hull and green tops, and maybe tie into the bit of red bottom paint that peaks above the waterline. Might be resorting to photoshop...

  23. #198
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Yeah - same tone as the cushions might well work. I often boat barefoot as well, so I like my Seattle Gray decks
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  24. #199
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    I like the carpet - great for the barefoot boaters - is there a different outdoor carpet color out there to tied it to the reddish seat cushions??
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  25. #200
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    You probably know that Duffy's original canvas was painted more like the color you're putting down now rather than that dark green Also it may be too late now (I take it you know this too), but painting canvas is more like a color wash than it is full coverage to retain the canvas texture. Once the canvas texture's been filled, it's a different program and there's no going back. I'm sorry to hear the canvas is going. It was perfectly maintained when I first saw the boat (thirty five years ago...LOL).

    All that's prelude for saying I don't recall ever seeing one of your types with a canvas fish deck. I usually see them painted and textured for footing or with laid decks....or with carpeting *(shrugs). Our boat had laid decks back there but wasn't a V-Drive so just smaller hatches for lazarette access and tank inspection, very different. You will not want to hear this but I think the outdoor carpeting solution was quite popular (if equally disliked with passing of time). Duffy's a mid-century build so you see what the questions are. They liked the carpeting. I don't so if it were me I'd probably paint and no-skid them (do a smart pattern) given it's the easiest solution, and possibly closest to the way she was delivered. Who doesn't like the look of a laid deck though?
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  26. #201
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    There is the remnants of the original tongue and groove decking back there. I'm guessing that when they did the repower (in 1956, 1996, or 2016) they cut out the original T&G back to the edges of the benches and re did the deck in the three-piece plywood affair that is there now.

    I'm not certain if the T&G was covered with anything, but it would make sense that it was, if only for weatherproofing. The soles in the interior of the boat were the same T&G, but covered with linoleum (which I would like to return to someday). Carpet does make sense, both from a practical and historic point of view (heck, if my grandma's house, which was probably last redecorated about 1958, is any reference, they revered outdoor carpet). That may be where we go, if I can fully wrap my mind around it. I don't know if ya'll have figured this out, but I want to bring her back to her early 1950s appearance, for better (in my eyes) or worse (in the eyes of some fellow yacht-ists).

    There is a question of what to do with the hatch edges though. The little wood battens are the bane of my existence, but I don't feel right about leaving the gaps open. If I put a single sheet of carpet down that may or may not suffice for weather proofing. I have thought of using stainless strips, maybe with only the slightest of overlaps.

    As to the painting of the canvas, I am doing my very best to apply the absolute minimum to change to color and seal up the areas that need it most. Im basically brushing it on and tipping the heck out of it to get all the excess off. As to the color, when we bought Duffy the then owner mentioned that the decks and cabin tops were originally a "sickly seafoam green color", to which I replied (in my head) "excellent".
    Last edited by RainierHooker; 05-17-2018 at 08:49 AM.

  27. #202
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    This is why I'm putting it out there. I have seen more than a few earlier boats with their laid decks and many of the later boats with fiberglassed decks. Duffy seems to be an odd transition between the two extremes and being, shall we say, a more "middle class" boat I just don't know what is the most appropriate in terms of originality and aesthetics. Some stuff is easy to research, but folks don't seem to eager to take detailed pictures of original period-correct engine decking...

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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by RainierHooker View Post
    This is why I'm putting it out there. I have seen more than a few earlier boats with their laid decks and many of the later boats with fiberglassed decks. Duffy seems to be an odd transition between the two extremes and being, shall we say, a more "middle class" boat I just don't know what is the most appropriate in terms of originality and aesthetics. Some stuff is easy to research, but folks don't seem to eager to take detailed pictures of original period-correct engine decking...
    She's yours now so you call the shots. If you did do a proper laid deck back there, nobody will ever complain.

    We had the same issue with the interior soles on Rita. They were originally lino covered cedar flooring. Over time the cedar/linoleum combo became unsightly, banged up and lost its integrity. Peeling off the lino left a mastic covered chippy mess that we couldn't do anything with. I ended up tearing out all the soles and replacing with 3/4" fir flooring. I made up a new (access) hatch program and used teak for all the margins for a good look and durability. It was a serious undertaking and wasn't entirely original (considering the lino as built) but it looked great and was a nice upgrade. I'll see if I can root up some photos. Rita's exterior decks were laid from day one except of course for the coach tops (canvas) and the foredeck which was T&G fir over which Irish felt and canvas had been laid. There's precedent for Monks with laid decks. Even though they all follow form, each boat was an individual. What you decide is entirely up to you and crafty upgrades are encouraged (by me)! Another option, and possibly one that requires less long term worry is to "glass over" (talk to John Thomas...he's got some tricks for this) that rear deck. The stainless margin idea is practical but I don't think would look very Monk-like and unless very cleverly done could turn out to be annoying in the long run. The stainless will stand a bit proud of the deck and may not provide the tight water seal you're looking for anyway. Quite a bit depends on managing how water is evacuated from the cockpit.....where scuppers are placed and how the deck is cambered or leveled to get the water out of there.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Thanks for the response, Lew. Duffy's engine decks, at least the outboard portions, appear to have been T&G planking originally, but I don't know if they were simply painted, covered with linoleum, or covered with carpet. Next time I'm down on the boat (this weekend is all at-home projects) I'll have to to do some sleuthing to see if there are any remnants of the previous decking under the side benches that were installed later in her life. I really, for some mostly irrational reason, would like to bring the decks back to as built at least in general appearance. As for how she is now:

    IMG-0826.jpg

    This is an older picture from before we bought Duffy, but it shows the decks reasonably well. They are simply plywood with carpet, with thin battens over the edges of the outboard hatches. The battens perpetually pop off and the carpet has never really fit right. The cockpit is self draining, with one small drain in either rear corner feeding into a through hull just above the waterline. The self draining-ness of the cockpit is somewhat dubious, since the hatches and their battens are far from watertight.

    If the original details can't be ascertained, I keep waffling between these options...

    - Painted or glassed plywood decking, no margins, covered with a single sheet of outdoor carpet
    - Painted Dynel-covered plywood, bronze or stainless "t" margins, with maybe, maybe not carpet
    - Painted or otherwise sealed T&G decking, as above without margins and covered in carpet, or with metal "T" margins and no carpet
    - Laid Fir decks, also with the above margin/carpet solutions

    From a purely practical standpoint, the glassed or dynel'd plywood would be probably be best, but laid decks do look nice, and period-correctness is high up on my want list.

    Its far from essential that we solve this problem immediately, but the next time one of the battens pops off when I open a hatch, I'm liable to throw it overboard in a fit of rage...

  30. #205
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Ease of maintenance for a high traffic area is a consideration. Raw fir is easy to keep but looks best on a workboat. Varnished fir looks nice but is a PITA. Glass is set it and forget it and looks like a painted sole. Time clarifies solutions so cool that you have such a luxury to think it through. The aesthetics are always a consideration in restoration but then again, you want to go boating and that's sometimes at odds with originality. Today, Monk would be drawing boats using new approaches and materials in a common sense way. He'd sign off on things that improve on his original notions. He was a simple, practical guy who understood economy.
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 05-21-2018 at 09:23 AM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  31. #206
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    FWIW Evan, I had the cockpit deck on Savona rebuilt with plywood and FG twenty years ago. I never regretted it and it's still going strong two owners later. That's what I would do in your case. I'd leave the carpet off though. Paint it with a non-skid additive and use stainless strips around the hatches. Simple and it will last forever. But I'll be cheering from the sidelines if you do go for the laid deck.

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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Poked around the boat a bit yesterday as I was resuming paint on the cabin tops. I squeezed myself as far into the engine bay as I had ever been to see if I could determine the original construction. Looks like the cockpit decks were a combination of T&G for the edges and probably plywood for the hatches. there looks like there was a piece of quarter round spaced about a quarter inch up surrounding the perimeter of the decks, likely pointing to carpet being there long ago.

    After looking at a few boats at Sundays Classic Boat gathering in Gig Harbor, including a nearly all original 1947 Elco, I think that that is probably the way to go. The Elco's cockpit decks were plywood, with the tops faired very very smooth (I'm not really sure how) and painted. Simple, but effective.

    While I was poking around I took apart the (not-original) settee in Duffy's bridge, pulled up the carpet under it and found a section of Duffy's original Linoleum:

    IMG-4265 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    Most of the linoleum was removed when Duffy's tanks were replaced back in the 1990s. The soles in the bridge were redone in plywood, painted, and covered in carpet. The outboard foot or so of the linoleum soles were left in place, but painted over. I had a sneaking suspicion that there was some that escaped the paintbrush and I was delighted to find this section hiding. Since then, I've been combing over current linoleum offerings...

  33. #208
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    Oct 2014
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    There are a lot of great options in linoleum, marmoleum, and sheet vinyl if you're willing to wait while they make it to order. They can make exact copies of what you already have too.

    https://www.atrafloor.com/vinyl-floo...inyl-flooring/

  34. #209
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    Dec 2005
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    FWIW Evan, I had the cockpit deck on Savona rebuilt with plywood and FG twenty years ago. I never regretted it and it's still going strong two owners later. That's what I would do in your case. I'd leave the carpet off though. Paint it with a non-skid additive and use stainless strips around the hatches. Simple and it will last forever. But I'll be cheering from the sidelines if you do go for the laid deck.
    I did a glass deck on Varnishing Point. Easy peasy, looked fine, stood up. Lino is appropriate down below and was common. It was a high tech material in 1928 and was specified on high quality builds, including many commuter yachts of the era. There are grades including some touted as virtually self healing. Laid decks are the bomb but not routinely seen except on the pre war boats.

    Monks are challenging to suss out. Today they all look like deluxe rigs but they were often economically driven builds. It can be hard to decide just how far or where to take them. And then, no two are exactly the same.
    Rita, Savona and Duffy are an interesting trio and case in point. Rita looks like what she is, a bit Deco, a bit 30s, and distinctly pre-war. Savona (1940) somewhat straddles the 30s and 50s but to my eye looks more like Duffy (1950) than Rita (1938). And if you look at Thelonious, you'd be forgiven if you thought she was built in 1935 instead of 1950, the same year Duffy was built.

    I think whatever you reasonably do with them, it can be argued to be in proper spirit. His boats were drawn all over the map although it has to be said they all have a family look and they're usually about the same under the waterline.


    Does that look like it was launched the same year as Duffy? Not hardly! Makes for a range of choices according to taste.
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 05-22-2018 at 01:45 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  35. #210
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    124

    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    I think glassed plywood cockpit decks are going to be the result of all this waffling, or maybe dynel. I hope to start banging something out in the short term, I'll probably use some of the coming long weekend to build a new center section.

    Continuing on with my list of things that I'm getting way ahead of myself on, I started shopping around for linoleum. I'm inclined to use real linoleum (linseed oil, wood fiber, and cork) rather than the various vinyl substitutes. Being a largely commercial grade product, it is only sold by the roll. That's 105' x 6' 6", yikes. I do need to redo the bathroom and kitchen floors in my house, so maybe they'll all match.

    Here's a few offerings from Forbo that I like, even if they aren't an match to the original...







    Since I'm already a few projects behind, I figured I'd order samples just to drive myself more crazy.

    Do any of you have any thoughts on linoleum/vinyl flooring (other than the purely aesthetic, I know some can't stand it). I'm concerned about the moisture-proofness and/or dimensional stability in a wood boat application. I had sworn off the tiles out of concern to the later, but they might work and be cheaper/easier to do, especially if I don't have to order in the same quantities as the sheet stuff. The first boat I worked on in my teens was built in the '50s and had original linoleum tile in usable shape, but it was a steel boat.

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