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Thread: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

  1. #71
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by RainierHooker View Post
    Well, looks like mother nature decided that my plans needed changing...

    We had a pretty bad windstorm in our marina last night. A few boats and a few docks sustained damage. Duffy was one of them. Her stern cleat was pulled clean out of the deck and took the fairlead and part of the toe and cap rails with it. The boat swung out and apparently repeatedly struck the dock by the stem, pulling the rub rail apart like a zipper and taking a big chunk out of the wood. Thankfully the folks in a live-abord a few slips over discovered it early this morning before more damage could be caused.

    IMG_3091 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3092 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    When you put that cleat back promise that you will through bolt it to a substantial backing block. Then look at the others as well.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #72
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    When you put that cleat back promise that you will through bolt it to a substantial backing block. Then look at the others as well.
    I promise.

    I have found two more cleats that match the waist cleats (old bronze Perko) and will be installing them to give me four proper cleats per side. All cleats will be removed, remounted and re-fastened with silicon bronze machine screws with some hefty backing plates in place of what's there. The stern cleats are the only ones mounted with those stainless wood screws. The waist cleats are mounted with bronze machine screws and washers, but could use backing plates.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Went to the candy store (Admiral Ship Supply) yesterday and picked up a bunch of supplies for haulout. Galvanized screws for some refastening, paints, and some nice beefy bronze fasteners for the cleats.

    Today I scrounged through the scrap metal bin at work found some stainless-steel sheet (301 1/2H) and whipped up a set of backing plates...

    IMG_3142 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3145 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    Its nice having a sheet metal fab shop to play with on break-time. 1/4 Silicon Bronze bolts, SS backing plates, Silicon Bronze fender washers, and Silicon Bronze Nuts, all bedded together with Dolphinite. I'll start with the stern cleats and then the waists will get a similar treatment. Should keep those things attached...

    Tomorrow I'm going to start disassembly on the V-Birth and chain locker to get to the back side of the stem, cuff, and keel.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    After lunch and my daughter spending some time 'driving' Duffy...

    IMG_3196 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  5. #75
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    ...I got the V-birth and chain locker pulled apart and the water heater unshipped.

    IMG_3203 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3205 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3207 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3209 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3211 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3215 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    No readily discernible internal damage, and the majority of that water you see in the bilges was from the water heater. Everything seems in pretty good knick. There is one sistered frame and the first few frames have those laminations epoxied onto them. Not sure that they are the best workmanship that I've seen, but far from the worst.

    I've gotten most of my supplies for haul out ready, just waiting for my shipment of topsides paint from Kirby. I scored some old growth fir offcuts from the architectural salvage place in town, so the next few days of breaks and lunchtimes will be spent cutting plugs.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Band-Aid installed...

    12 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    ...I'm sure that I'm one of the few people that my marina has ever witnessed doing a lead and tar patch on an boat, and I got a few glances from my neighbors as a result. Its not the prettiest patch, but it should suffice for the 30 mile trip to the yard next weekend. The worst part of the day was the fact that the weather was perfect for a spin around the bay, but prudence prevailed.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    ^^^ That looks pretty good to me Evan! I'd be happy with that for a trip to your yard of choice. Nice work. And I love the shot of your daughter at the helm. I have some photos like that of Dash at that age on a couple of different boats. Got to start them young...

  8. #78
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Oakie Dokie...

    The day before yesterday was the start of a (hopefully) week-long process to get Duffy back to ship shape. We motored from Tacoma up to Shilshole on an uneventful and quick transit.

    IMG_3277 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3280 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3284 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  9. #79
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Safe in Shilshole, and her nose band-aid still there with no changes, we tied her up and planned for the early morning trip through the locks and to Canal Boatyard...

    IMG_3288 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3290 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  10. #80
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    After an early morning commute, that took just about as long as the day before's boat ride, we got Duffy off the dock in Shilshole and headed up the canal to the Ballard Locks. They had just reopened the small locks a few days before and we were seemingly the only boat awake, so we locked-in in record time.

    IMG_3291 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    We cozied up to the seawall at the boatyard and waited for our haul, which happened an hour early.

    IMG_3296 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3317 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  11. #81
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    They put us in a stall right next to Duffy's slightly older, and slightly bigger sister "Carol M" which is getting some planks replaced by Mark Lerdahl.

    IMG_3321 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    Mark has one more day of work on "Carol M" so we devoted the day to cleanup and triage.

    IMG_3323 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3324 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    By the time the sun was starting to set we had pulled off the band-aid, scraped the bottom, found a few bad seams and fasteners, and devised a semi-coherant plan for the next few days.

    Stay tuned for some proper meat-n-potatoes boat repair in the coming days...

  12. #82
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Yard Day Two...

    Lots of progress, and got most of the yuk work done. Top and bottom are sanded, the latter to fair and the former to fair-ish. Suspect fasteners identified and mostly uncovered. Suspect seams reefed...

    IMG_3331 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3332 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  13. #83
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    IMG_3335 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3342 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3343 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    ...we've got our work cut and laid out for us today. Caulking, refastening, thru-hulls, and a few leaky bits around the rudder post and transom.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    "...we've got our work cut and laid out for us today. Caulking, refastening, thru-hulls, and a few leaky bits around the rudder post and transom."

    From the owner of another vintage Monk of the paint-grade persuasion, know that when time runs short there is always roof cement for those underwater seams. Tks for this thread, it's a pleasure to watch! / Jim

  15. #85
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    I guess I'm here really late in the development of this thread but be that as it may, I knew Duffy when her original owner (Dr. Eugene Kidd) had her and kept her at Seattle Yacht Club. I hope I'm not going back over plowed ground but here's a little that I know about her.

    She was built by Dick Adams (you probably know that) who built a number of similar Monks of the same general type. I looked at her seriously (maybe 1987 or so...a bit vague as it was a LONG time ago) when Dr. Kidd (who commissioned her) put her up for sale the first time. In fact, we took her to survey. Her interior charmed us. It's quality and originality are probably due the fact that the doc re-canvassed her decks properly just before he offered her for sale. Of course that she was in covered moorage (SYC) all her life to that point helped greatly. Apart from her charm though, she needed a bit of work and some new systems but Dr. Kidd was extremely inflexible so we passed. A few years later, I saw her on the dock at Hannan Yacht Sales which was over by Seattle Marina. At that time, there were a few brokers who specialized in wooden boats so you could dock crawl and see a good portion of what was available for sale at that moment. Sadly they're long gone now. In any case, I noticed that some of the problems we'd discovered had been corrected (notably frames and planking at the stern) although she still had her original Chrysler V8 which was understandably a bit tired after 35 years.

    As I think you'd mentioned, the doctor had died so the boat finally went up for sale by Mrs. Kidd for the second time and I suspect she was considerably more eager to sell than the doctor. The rest of the story is yours to tell of course but I just want to add (if it's not already clear) that I spent some pleasant time learning about Monk's designs and the boats that actually got built locally. If you haven't already, see if you can find a copy of Bet Oliver's book, Ed Monk and the Tradition of Classic Boats. You'll find a nice picture of Duffy on pg. 75 along with a bit of her story. She covers and illustrates a lot of the boats and types Monk penned including one we owned for 20 years. It's pretty much the Monk Bible.

    Here's wishing you a happy journey with her, and with hopes she doesn't provide too many more surprises although I have to say what follows. Most of the west coast Monk builds (somewhat builder/owner dependent) were not really intended to be around 75 years later. It's a testament to them that such relatively affordable and practical boats do last that long and longer. Still, whatever hasn't been replaced or updated routinely will probably need to be done on any boat intended for family use in the Northwest's waters. Wooden cruising boats are never standing still, they're always in motion going either forwards or backwards as respects condition. It's hard to hold them in one place and still use them as intended. Our 25 year journey in two different Monk designed boats was some of the best fun ever, but it was not easy.

    By the way, I did end up (coincidence) with an Adams built Monk as my first wooden cruiser project and enjoyed it while we had it and in some ways wish I still did have her. She's be perfect on the Cumberland!
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 05-14-2018 at 10:37 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Lew,

    Thanks for the response, it was far from redundant, and helps us confirm a few suspicions that we have had regarding the last few years of its ownership by Dr Kidd. We have the Bet Oliver book.

    We have often said that if you told the original builders that these boats were still floating, much less being used, three quarters of a century later, they wouldn't believe you. No, Duffy isn't perfect, and the last three days of poking her underbelly and innards have turned up plenty of issues and previous questionable repairs. But, nothing is catastrophic or unrepairable.

    We looked at so many boats, including two other contemporary Monks, when we were shopping, that there have been times where I've thought "gee, we should've bought the m/v whateversuch" but the fact that so few hands have been in this pudding still endears Duffy to us and should keep the odd random old repair discoveries to a minimum. Even if we have to replace every fastener and sister every other frame (which we won't) we hope to at least get Duffy to her 100th birthday.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Hello, just found the thread.

    Lovely boat, good luck with the repairs.
    Everything can be fixed in time.

    I'll be following along.

    Peter Knowles
    1953 38' Monk, "Geordie"

  18. #88
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Those two boats hauled next to each other like that warm my heart.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Thanks all, day four of haulout is going well. I spent the morning replacing fasteners on the port side. Ninety percent done replacing all of the most questionable nails on that side, and we should have that, and the starboard side done tomorrow.

    Mark started cutting out the damaged stem. There's good news in that he hit good wood more than an inch shy of the rabbit, so it will be a pretty strait forward scarf. We will be replacing all the bolts that attach the knee to the stem and keel.

    It's my turn to entertain the kids this afternoon, so while Sara is reefing and caulking seams, I'm running the kids over to MOHAI and the Seattle Center for Wooden Boats.

    Pictures of progress to follow when we get home tonight...

  20. #90
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    What technique are you using to remove the existing fasteners?
    Are they clinched boat nails?

    Thanks,
    Peter

  21. #91
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Peter,

    We are being really selective with the fasteners. We scraped the bottom to locate all the fastener locations, once we found them we use a pick to determine if there is any fastener to speak of. If there is, and it is still strong, we treat it with ospho and putty back over it. If there is one, but it is weak, we do the same, but sink a least new Screw at that position. If the nail is so degraded that the pick turns it to dust, we drill right on top of the old nail, treat the hole with ospho, and sink a new Screw. All the screws are bedded with a tiny bit of dolpanite and plugged over.

    In the end we will have put at least one new fastener in about half of the frame/plank locations below the waterline this year. We still have a lot of good nails, but in doing it this way, over the course of a few annual haulouts, we hope to add as much strength as possible without potentially damaging the planks by pulling out the galvanized iron square boat nails. The nails are not clinch type, they don't go all the way through the frames.

    Above the waterline, we only found a total of ten nails that had wasted, they are being dealt with in much the same way but we are being much more selective in sinking new fasteners.
    Last edited by RainierHooker; 03-22-2018 at 10:54 PM.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Haul Out Day 4...

    We started the day in a downpour, and as such we made somewhat of a rain shade out of a huge roll of poly...

    IMG_3358 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr /> ...and then I started refastening:

    IMG_3355 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr /> IMG_3353 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />


    Like I said in my previous post, we have inspected every fastener below the waterline and are leaving good nails in place, after a wash with ospho, and drilling out the bad ones. The holes get a squirt with ospho, just to kill any remaining rust that the tapered bit didn't catch. #12 Galvanized Screws from Standard Fasteners get a dab of dolphinite and get plunked into the hole.
    Last edited by RainierHooker; 03-22-2018 at 11:10 PM.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    While I was doing that Mark started on Duffy's nose job. Joy of joys, good clean oak was struck far clear of the rabbit, and we should have the scarf pretty well in order tomorrow...

    IMG_3364 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr /> IMG_3362 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr /> IMG_3360 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />


    My wife managed to finish reefing the last of our questionable seams below the waterline. I should have the refastening done tomorrow. Mark is going to recaulk a few seams around the stem, and Sara is hoping to have the rest caulked tomorrow. Hopefully we're applying seam compound by the end of the day.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    ^ Those scarfs are shorter than I would like to see, especially the lower one.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  25. #95
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    ^ Those scarfs are shorter than I would like to see.

    While maybe not ideal, they are the best we could manage while dodging the bolts that connect the stem, knee, and keel. Speaking of those, we are replacing a few...

  26. #96
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by RainierHooker View Post
    While maybe not ideal, they are the best we could manage while dodging the bolts that connect the stem, knee, and keel. Speaking of those, we are replacing a few...
    Including the ones at the scarfs, or not?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  27. #97
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    First thing I thought too, drop the scarph down to pick up the bolts.
    And taper it further out at the top.
    Its no more work, this is a structural nog.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Evan, it looks to me that the stem has been knocked up and in from the impact. If so can/should you attempt to return it to the original position, or better to bolt it where is? / Jim

  29. #99
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Thanks for the thorough description of how you're dealing with the nails.
    I know this is in my future so I'm grateful for any insight.

    Best of luck with the stem.

    Cheers
    Peter

  30. #100
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Haulout Day 5:

    We spent the morning pulling the what Stem-Knee-Keel bolts that we could, or what was left of them...

    IMG_3366 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />


    The ones tying the stem to the knee were mostly there, but the ones tying the keel to the knee had their heads popped off. Not that there was much holding this heads on anyway. The gap apparent in the previous pictures between the stem and keel timbers is due to the keel dropping probably an eighth to a quarter of an inch due to this. We are going to get a jack under there and replace the bolts to suck it back in.

    As to why we didn't want to mess with the stem bolts at the scarf, notably the lower one, is because that one's shank and nut are trapped behind the stringers that run aft and transition to the chine timbers. There is an athwartship timber tying those to each other and the knee. Removing that bolt, which was good and tight, and re-installing would cause more potential problems than it would solve.

    In any case, the scarf got made up and roughed in...

    IMG_3371 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    IMG_3372 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  31. #101
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Meanwhile, Sara got the port side entirely recaulked save the stem area, and I paid all the seams behind her...

    IMG_3370 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    IMG_3374 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />

    Starboard side should be buttoned up today and we will start prepping for paint.

  32. #102
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    You guys are doing a great job getting after it! There’s not a doubt in my mind that there are lots of old boats with a stem repair just like that one. Thanks for sharing your progress.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    you guys are really making progress, and it looks like sara's schooling is certainly paying off! looking good.

    jim

  34. #104
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Haulout Day 6:

    Sara kept plugging away on caulking and sealing while I helped Mark with the bow. We ended up getting the keel sucked back up into place and ended up adding two additional bolts to the ones we replaced, one extra for the stem and one extra for the keel.

    IMG_3378 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3381 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

  35. #105
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    Default Re: m/v Duffy - or - A Family's Misadventures on a 1950 Monk Cruiser

    Haulout Day 7:

    Rounding out a full week, we finally got to a point where we could put bottom paint on. While Mark finished up the stem woodwork, I started painting the bottom and Sara caulked the bow.

    IMG_3384 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3387 by Evan Bailly, on Flickbr />
    IMG_3391 by Evan Bailly, on Flickr

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