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Thread: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

  1. #1
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    Default 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    My newest/biggest project. You all are an inspiration and have been very helpful and supportive in my past projects. I might be crazy, but at least I have you all. You understand, I'm sure.

    Here she is. How can you not love her?
    What a beauty! by trbrackett1


    On a cradle on a trailer since 1988. The cradle has left some indentations in the hull, which I hope are minor. But I believe I may need to replace the plywood, and hopefully no frames. Last start of her 4cyl 60hp engine was in 1990.

    Headed home. by trbrackett1, on Flickr

    Got her home on a different trailer with bunks that are not very helpful at all. I managed to put a bit of a dent in the hull breaking the plywood. I'm chalking that up to a learning experience. I've not dealt with a boat this big and heavy before. Since I'm thinking bottom replacement is in her future, I'm trying to feel ok about it. I've since done some shimming, which I should have done more properly before transporting. The pressure has been relieved to the point where I can sleep at night for at least a couple days.

    The lifting eye on the bow is very useful. My little tractor can only lift so high. But my counter balance worked great.
    Lifting bow to get better support under it. by trbrackett1, on Flickr

    More to come...

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Shims along the bunks to help relieve pressure. The simplest solutions escape me sometimes. I should have done this much earlier, like before we hauled it home.



    But this is only a temporary problem. You see, the plan is for it to go into the barn. The problem is that I need to find 4 more inches somewhere. Taking the windshield off and letting air out of the tires, removing trim from the door...none of these will gain me enough to clear the top of the doorway. So I went back for the original cradle with the intention of adding wheels bunks to it to better support the boat and lower it enough to fit. Saves me the cost and time of making a new one. Getting it in quickly is important, as the weather on our hill can be extreme and I go back to work on Thursday.

    image by trbrackett1, on Flickr[/IMG]

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    I'm looking forward to the restoration. Should be lots of fun getting the boat off the trailer! Is that decorative piece under the bow pulpit a swan's neck? Is it original?
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I'm looking forward to the restoration. Should be lots of fun getting the boat off the trailer! Is that decorative piece under the bow pulpit a swan's neck? Is it original?
    Yeah. It's a swan's neck. Not at all original. Although, I'm finding it difficult to find another boat like it. From what I read there were only 800 built.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    She already looks a world better with that 'hardtop' removed. As you have found, because Trojans were quite lightly built you will need to be carefiul about how you block and support her. She is a cute little cruiser. Good for you for saving her.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Getting closer to fitting in the barn. When we built this barn I had only planned on having one small boat. Silly me.

    Wheels on the cradle. Yes they are mismatched. Imagine going to buy wheels and the store has only one or two of each size and type.


    Getting closer to fitting in the barn. by trbrackett1, on Flickr

    Today I'm going to prepare for the motor to be pulled out. Hopefully, I will be lucky enough to get a friend with a lift arm on his flatbed truck to come lift it out prior to moving the boat to the cradle. If I'm really lucky, he'll stick around for the moving of the boat too.



    Last started in 1990. 4cyl 60hp. Guess it doesn't take much to move this "lightweight."

    That's good, because I haven't figured out just how I'm going to push it into the barn yet. Perhaps pulling it with a come-along? Perhaps a lot of people and a lot of yelling? It's a tight fit, so accurate steering will be important and perhaps too much for a large number of people to handle. If it were a different boat, I would consider strapping the boat to the cradle and pushing against the boat with the tractor (with plenty of padding of course). Any ideas?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    First thing you'll have to do is put some plywood down on the ground before the boat goes on the cradle. Those wheels will dig into the dirt/gravel and you'll get nowhere. I learned this from experience. I had the same size wheels (actually a bit bigger) on the cradle for my fantail launch. I thought they'd do fine on my packed gravel driveway. Not. And your boat is way heavier then mine.
    Also, those swiveling casters want to go in every direction except straight. Best to get a crowd of people to help. I'd hook up a winch to pull it in with several people helping to steer with 2x4 ply bars.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    I agree, lay some plywood down fist. Then I would go with a come-along or block and tackle from the far wall inside the barn. Make sure the wall is fastened to the foundation, and pull the cradle, not the boat. It should be s fairly easy job for two people, one pulling and the other steering with a 2x4 'prybar' to lever the cradle one way or the other as she goes. Also some good size wedges as needed to be able to block the wheels at one end in place while persuading the other end around.

    The engine looks nice and clean, probably won't take much to get it going.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    First thing you'll have to do is put some plywood down on the ground before the boat goes on the cradle. Those wheels will dig into the dirt/gravel and you'll get nowhere. I learned this from experience. I had the same size wheels (actually a bit bigger) on the cradle for my fantail launch. I thought they'd do fine on my packed gravel driveway. Not. And your boat is way heavier then mine.
    Also, those swiveling casters want to go in every direction except straight. Best to get a crowd of people to help. I'd hook up a winch to pull it in with several people helping to steer with 2x4 ply bars.
    Thanks, Rich. I'm leaning toward winching it in. I can put an anchor in the concrete floor to hook a come-along to. I have "smart wheels" on one end of the cradle. They are on the bow end of the boat, so will be the back set of wheels going in. I guess I'll need to scrounge up some plywood. I have a couple of heavy rubber stall mats that I could use also. The pry bars are a good idea.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    I agree, lay some plywood down fist. Then I would go with a come-along or block and tackle from the far wall inside the barn. Make sure the wall is fastened to the foundation, and pull the cradle, not the boat. It should be s fairly easy job for two people, one pulling and the other steering with a 2x4 'prybar' to lever the cradle one way or the other as she goes. Also some good size wedges as needed to be able to block the wheels at one end in place while persuading the other end around.
    We are thinking the same. I've seen wheel stops made from 2x4s in the shape of a U that you slip around the wheel to keep it from rolling. I think I could use a couple of those.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Now with some beefy bunks. I just played connect the dots with the supports that were there. I'm hoping this will stop the boat from being misshapen by those supports. The plan is to start work in the spring. So getting it safely into the barn is the goal for now.



    I hope to get the engine out prior to going into the barn, as there is not enough headroom in there to get it out afterward. I know pretty much NOTHING about inboards. So I'm struggling with how/where to unattach the drive shaft to the prop from the motor. Advice welcome. Here's what I'm looking at.

    How to get these apart. That is the question. by trbrackett1, on Flickr[/IMG]

  12. #12
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Looks like a fun project...what year is she? As far as gaining 4", can you replace your wheels with "junk yard rims" with no tires? Will that get you through...or is she already inside?

    WgMkr

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Your idea of a floor anchor is fine but I think stall mats are too soft and those small wheels will sink in. You'll need plywood that is heavy enough to keep the wheels from punching through internal voids. Just a thought, would several lengths of 2" id or 4" id pipe spread the weight over the plywood surface better than the wheels? They may roll easier than the wheels. I am sure that if this is a bad idea others will chime in. . .
    Steamboat

    I get by with the judicious use of serendipity.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Wagemaker View Post
    Looks like a fun project...what year is she? As far as gaining 4", can you replace your wheels with "junk yard rims" with no tires? Will that get you through...or is she already inside?

    WgMkr
    Junk yard rims is a good idea. I need to also get her onto the cradle though. The trailer bunks are not placed correctly.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Steamboat View Post
    Your idea of a floor anchor is fine but I think stall mats are too soft and those small wheels will sink in. You'll need plywood that is heavy enough to keep the wheels from punching through internal voids. Just a thought, would several lengths of 2" id or 4" id pipe spread the weight over the plywood surface better than the wheels? They may roll easier than the wheels. I am sure that if this is a bad idea others will chime in. . .
    Yeah, I've been talked out of the stall mats.
    I have visions of the pipes becoming unsquare to the boat and door.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry's Gal View Post
    Yeah, I've been talked out of the stall mats.
    I have visions of the pipes becoming unsquare to the boat and door.
    Easily adjusted with a tap of a good sledge hammer. You are not going as fast as walking speed.
    Steamboat

    I get by with the judicious use of serendipity.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    I've used the old 'pipe roller' trick several times to move heavy objects by myself, including a 1,000 lb. lead keel.

    I also know nothing of motors or inboards, but can you loosen what looks like a set screw/bolt on the collar by the motor, loosen the clamps around the stuffing box and just slip the prop and prop shaft out through the back? It all looks so simple from where I sit, a couple hundred miles away!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Steamboat View Post
    Easily adjusted with a tap of a good sledge hammer. You are not going as fast as walking speed.
    Hmm.. ok. That is something to consider.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    As far as disconnecting the prop shaft. Do that right at the coupler joint aft of the tranny. Might want to start soaking the bolts in penetrating fluid. I prefer PB Blaster.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Prop shaft is disconnected! Yes. PB Blaster! I discovered it just this year when borrowing a piece of equipment from a local farmer. Love it.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: 1954 Trojan Sea Breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry's Gal View Post
    Prop shaft is disconnected! Yes. PB Blaster! I discovered it just this year when borrowing a piece of equipment from a local farmer. Love it.
    Well, that was just way too easy!!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

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