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Thread: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

  1. #1
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    Default 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    On top of the amputations another 80 people per day seek emergency care from other injuries that are the result of using tablesaws.

    http://www.npr.org/2017/08/10/542474...-safer-drag-on
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    my table saw makes me nervous every time i turn it on. hopefully my fear of it will keep me vigilant and safe.

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Damn, that's a lot of amputations. The good thing about the tablesaw is that it's obvious to anyone it's very dangerous. I can't find the data now, but I read that there are actually more amputations from bandsaws, which aren't nearly as scary. And I'd rather not talk about jointers.

    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    Damn, that's a lot of amputations.


    was there an increase in wood boat production in 2015?

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    ...
    Steve Martinsen

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Rather fewer than those who lose their minds when they touch a keyboard.
    If you welcome devils to your house, then you must feed them Afghan proverb.

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws



    Good one!


    Yeah - if the day arrives where turning on a table/band/circular saw doesn't 'give me pause', time to go to hand tools.
    There's a lot of things they didn't tell me when I signed on with this outfit....

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by George Jung View Post


    Good one!


    Yeah - if the day arrives where turning on a table/band/circular saw doesn't 'give me pause', time to go to hand tools.
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    I would have thought bandsaws were more "amped up".

  10. #10
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    The one tool I'm more wary of than my 10 table saw is my 8" Milwaukee "skilsaw". I even traded off an old Craftsman that my wife's first hubby had and got the virtually new Milwaukee at ReTool just for a slight upgrade in "handiness". Money well spent, as far as I'm concerned.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    A sad and unnecessary state of affairs.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    My wife came very close to losing a hand once, and a friend of mine who owns a cabinet shop and does this all day long every day also came very close a few years ago (he is also one of the best racing sailors I know). Any way at all to make this a safer business they should do, because these things are dangerous as heck even for experienced people.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Feather boards and push sticks are your friends.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard38 View Post
    Feather boards and push sticks are your friends.
    As are crown guards and riving knives.

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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Time to review my Saw Stop job site saw?

    As a saw, it is about average for the class although I judge the fence sub par. It only locks on the user's side, and feels flimsy and just this side of inadequate to the task. Not just compared to my old 66's Accufence, but also compared to my old Ridgid job site saw which had a decent fence for a small saw. In fact, I'd say the Saw Stop is pretty comparable to the Ridgid (or the opposite if you prefer) except that the Ridgid's fence was more confidence inspiring and the SS has a superior portable base system. On the other hand, the SS has probably got as good a base and deployment system as it's possible to get with a job site saw.

    Judged solely as a saw, the Saw Stop comes up as MEH, largely due to the fence. Although a special condemnation of the miter gauge is also in order. How they feel comfortable including such a miserable, cheap and useless accessory with such an expensive saw is just short of criminal. The small Saw Stop also feels underpowered, even in this class of rather low power saws. It gets the job done but you have to be patient and it certainly has no more power than saws costing half the price.

    In respect to portability, having a very solid and convenient base/carriage and its other features (including a great bevel cutting system) , it ranks rather higher. Still there is nothing different or fundamentally better in the way it cuts wood than my old Ridgid. It just happens to have this one unique, and to judge by the tone of this thread, highly valuable feature.

    Finale: I rate it A for safety, B- as a saw ( B+ if comparing to other better job site saws), and C for value.

    If you have the room and you want a Saw Stop, it's probably worth it to go to their larger saws, either the contractor saw or the full cabinet saw, both of which use a different and better fence system. I don't have the room anymore so I live with the compromises a job site saw imposes and even with my downer review, the saw is still a better tool than I am!
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 08-10-2017 at 04:43 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    In many moons in various cabinet/carpentry shops, the only time I hurt myself was while using a table saw. You can do damage with any whirring blade(though haste or "numbness" are responsible for most of the other big-tool injuries), but a table saw is an unpredictable witch. In the case of my injury it was an unexpected kick while ripping. Luckily my hand was in front of the blade when the saw kicked. Big twelve inch Powermatic, and the board tore up my index and middle fingers of my right hand pretty good. I probably could have used a stitch or two, but I was young and full of beans.

    Reviewing: the saw kicked because the grain in the board was schizoid and the board bound between the blade and the fence when the wood moved. Push sticks might have helped, but the cut wasn't close to the fence and in a commercial shop on a schedule...well you get into a groove and sometimes don't take the time. And, young and immortal doncha know?

    Be careful out their, it's a jungle.
    So many questions, so little time.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Check out Google Images for "angle grinder accidents"
    He's a Mexican. -- Donald Trump.
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  18. #18
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by ishmael View Post
    Push sticks might have helped
    what about a splitter or riving knife? fence mounted featherboard? anti-kickback pawls?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Close to 50 years using power tools on a daily basis and I still have all my digits. Lots of stitches, but they're still all there.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by Osborne Russell View Post
    Check out Google Images for "angle grinder accidents"
    jesus
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Paul,

    IIRC, the splitter was on the saw, but the short board never got that far. Feather board was available, but for a single rip on fairly wide board...
    So many questions, so little time.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Routers really make me quite careful. I do respect my table saw, but really, there is something about routers that make me nervous.

    Incidentally, my late father bandsawed off the tip of one finger after 50+ years doing amateur woodworking. He was almost 80 at the time, and basically shrugged it off.
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

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  23. #23
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    There is no chance I will cut off my finger with a table saw.

    Unless one falls out of a truck, and the table clips me as I swerve, and crushes my finger between itself and the handlebar, and my finger is torn off.

    Or, if I were hanging from a ledge by my fingers and a tablesaw were dropped on them.

    Maybe if I offended a table saw, and he challenged me to a duel, and we fought with cutlasses, and he caught me slipping, a table saw MIGHT cut my finger off.

    Peace,
    Robert

  24. #24
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    A sad and unnecessary state of affairs.
    I think I might disagree about 'unnecessary'. What's your reasoning?
    David G
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  25. #25
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Too many people give in to the urge to reach in with their fingers and "tidy things up".

    It's worse with grain augers...

  26. #26
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    If mister Gass is so concerned about safety, why is he fighting so hard to keep Bosch's version of a safety saw off the market. He's just using the government to force all saw manufacturers to use only his device and exclude competition.
    I'd like to see the break down of injuries by saw class and owner experience/training. I've had my General 350 for over 30 years use it daily, sharp blade,lots of power, push sticks feather boards over head blade guard and training in both machine operation and safety practices.
    Not many other people use my saw, but when they do they get a quick check out, a safety briefing and then I'm out of there, it creeps me out watching others use a table saw.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    We've talked about this a good deal in the past. There are several threads. Here's one - http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ble+saw+safety
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  28. #28
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    Default

    Table saw always scares me. Router makes me nervous. For some reason a band saw doesnt bother me in the least. I suppose I need a change if attitude. Oh, I don't like circular saw at all.



    Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk

  29. #29
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by peb View Post
    Table saw always scares me. Router makes me nervous. For some reason a band saw doesnt bother me in the least. I suppose I need a change if attitude. Oh, I don't like circular saw at all.



    Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk
    That's because you can walk away from a band saw in mid cut, go get lunch, and it will still be quietly purring away when you get back.

    One must push the work piece directly in line with the band saw blade. There is no geometric advantage being supplied by a fence.

    This means that the most common band saw injury is slicing off half the first joint of the right thumb.

    Be careful, my friend.
    Rattling the teacups.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Rule #1)
    DON'T PUT YOUR GD FINGERS WHERE YOU WOULDN'T PUT YOUR DI*K.
    Rule #2)
    CONCENTRATE,AND QUIT THINKING ABOUT P*SSY.

    That is all.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    My father in law, mis-guessed a cut on his bench saw, and dropped his hand onto the blade. He wrapped the mess in the nearest shop rag and called a neighbor to drive him to the hospital. As the doctor unwrapped the soggy mess of fingers he cheerfully said, "If you brought some mustard, we have all of hamburger we need."

    As the doctor wrapped things up, my father in law said, " I guess this is the dumbest accident you've seen today..."
    "No," the doctor said, "A while ago a fellow came in after having picked up his lawn mower while it was running, and cut off the tips of eight fingers."

  32. #32
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by peb View Post
    Table saw always scares me. Router makes me nervous. For some reason a band saw doesnt bother me in the least. I suppose I need a change if attitude. Oh, I don't like circular saw at all.



    Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk
    My first exposure to bandsaws was the meat saw in the butcher house. Bandsaws still terrify me, mostly bcause I learned to saw up bones with them.

    Actually, all power tools and equipment make me edgy. Good edgy, you know? I don't tolerate foolishness around danger.
    Peace,
    Robert

  33. #33
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    I have actually been so close as to touch the powered-up blade of my tablesaw, and not break the skin, twice. The first hour of my first professional furniture factory job I had an oak stave about two feet long kick back and bang me in the thumbnail hard enough to turn it purple. I wanted to quit that job so much in the first week. Awful place to work.

    One of the things about powered cutting machines, is the sound they make, as they turn on, get up to speed, and then as the material is engaged. My new vintage Delta shaper, makes a sort of roar, just from the big steel cutters whipping the air, that can make certain of your involuntary muscles spasm before it ever touches a workpiece. A large chunk of steel spinning or rotating at high speed, just a blur of carbide sharpness, with a couple or three horsepower behind it. The other distinctive thing about such machines is the sound they make when the wrong thing suddenly happens. Like when the tablesaw throws your half-ripped two-by through the kitchen door. Your tablesaw is not supposed to make a sound like an ax biting into a trree trunk. But if it does, your mind will already be occupied with other aspects of the event, and the question, am I missing anything? Am I bleeding? Was she in the kitchen?

    ---

    Here's a little power equipment story. Not woodworking but involving a large diesel and blades that weigh fifty pounds. At Osan AB in Korea, in the seventies, one of our duties working in the secure compound, where all paperwork is automatically stamped classified whether work related or not, was burn-bag detail. When it's your turn, you collect all the classified material burn-bags from all the work stations on the ops floor. Each bag gets marked with the highest classification of it's contents and then dated and stapled closed, just for the trip outside to the secure destruction device, either the incinerator or, in this case the shredder. Two people on the swing shift do this detail.

    The shredder was in it's own windowless concrete cinderblock shack, in the same charming military base secure compound style. Inside, bolted to a concrete pad was an enornous International Harvester diesel engine, which turned a big shaft with a dozen half-inch thick steel plates, maybe eight or ten inch radius from the shaft, an inch or so apart, mounted perpendicular to the rotation, like blades, but without a sharp edge, just square. That arbor must have weighed a hundred pounds.

    In front of the large steel housing that covered the blades, was a long steel table with a four inch coaming on each side, attached to the shredder at the opening to the spinning shaft of steel death with a heavy, rubber-slatted shielding curtain.

    Grab a burn-bag off the pile, rip it open over the table, and check it for glass or soda cans. If a soda can got in there, it would get balled up into a half-inch diameter bullet and get flung back out through the rubber with force enough to make a bang when it hit the wall.

    Then start shoving the growing pile of classified paper into the maw past the rubber strips and it gets instantly shredded to dust. Like dryer lint. The lint gets sold the locals for something. So turn on the big diesel. When it's humming along up to speed, start tossing in the stuff. The big motor makes it's characteristic loud noise, the vibrations of it in the concrete floor are almost a foot massage. The sound of the huge whirling chunks of steel, even before they touch anything is equally impressive. The whole shed, when that thing was going, was alive. But easy not to fall in, right?

    After running it a while, it would have a tendency to get clogged with lint in the top of the housing just out of reach of the blades. So it had to be periodically cleared. On the floor a coupla feet away was a small pile of two-by-fours about a coupla feet long. When the machine needed declogging, you just hefted one of the two-bys through the rubber strips while it was running. It made exactly the sound of a big ax, one time, a beat, another split second of banging, and then the sound of a short heavy buzz like saw. Ching. Bap bap zzzzzzt. Wood was gone into powder instantly. It was an awesome thing. After the lifer, er supervisor, showed us the routine and left, we made sure that sucker got cleared a couple more times before we were done, cause why not, right? We were nineteen. The first few times we tossed the wood in, and it chunked into dust, we turned to each and giggled insanely. Relax, the USAF is keeping the country safe while you sleep.

    Sometime around midnight as we were grinding along, the door opens and it's our crew's boss, the lifer tech sargent WAF. She was a decent supervisor, and everyone liked her (but not in that way.) She was quite a bit older than us, a good linguist and knew the job, but she was just a fun target for a prank. Poor woman, RIP.

    She's got to check on us, or she's bored because there is no traffic at midnight, or something. We were not kind. She came into the room while the machine was running and waiting to be fed. She did not want to be there already, but because of the noise, she had to get close enough to say something to us. As she stepped up, and we just happened to be on either side of her, absolutely spontaneously and impromtu-like, we each put a hand on her upper arm just above the stripes, and then turned and started to muscle her towards the machine. Just for a second.

    If you tossed someone in there, there would only be a reddish mist and that sequence of noise, the chop and buzz, would be maybe a little squishier.

    The look on her face. It was worth it. Almost as good as the time we stole her barbecue right off her hibatchi as we walked to the base theatre.

    Good times.
    Last edited by Jim Mahan; 08-11-2017 at 07:19 AM.


  34. #34
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    a few years ago there was a guy in our county that died when he went to use his compound miter saw. he had just changed the blade and didn't screw it down well. they said the blade came off and ran across his neck. he bled out before he made it back to the door to the house. i triple check that nut when i change a blade now.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: 10 Americans per day lose fingers on tablesaws

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Too many people give in to the urge to reach in with their fingers and "tidy things up".

    It's worse with grain augers...
    Oh Jeebus, yes. I have a friend who lost both arms to one of those.

    What are you doing about it?




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