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Thread: Coast of Ireland

  1. #1
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    Default Coast of Ireland

    PBS special on tonight about the coast of Ireland. Just caught a few minutes of it, narrator was out rowing among Baskin sharks in the most beautiful wooden boat. Anyone see this? Would love to know the history of this boat.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Liz and I saw most of the program. Its a nice boat and the guy apparently liked it. Seemed like a perfectly normal little row/workboat to me. I do have serious doubts about how far he actually went in it in that risky coastal area.

    The thing that amazes me about most of this kind of program is the person or persons doing the photography. They seem to me to have a far more difficult and perhaps more dangerous job than the people getting the credit.
    Tom L

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Watch the credits. The camera guys were there.

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Do you mean this?
    http://www.pbs.org/program/irelands-wild-coast/

    The boat is a currach, a skin(now canvas) covered boat.






    There are several local variants.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland



    A two man Naomhóg. Oddly he is in one off Donegal(they are from Kerry)

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland



    In this video he appears to be in a Dunfanaghy Curach(they are from Donegal!) even though these humpbacks are off Kerry! The producers must have mixed the boats up.

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Currach it is! Thank you.

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    Default

    I saw the show and was impressed by the oars - long square sticks with maybe a bit of taper where the blades would normally be. Also a bit fastened on with a hole in it to drop over a those pin. New to me anyway.


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    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    "Man of Aran" is a good documentary from 1934, about the lives of the fishermen and their families on the islnd.

    Here's a clip...



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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by timcooke View Post


    A two man Naomhóg. Oddly he is in one off Donegal(they are from Kerry)
    Dang.

    I have been doing oars all wrong. Boats, too, I guess. All my SOF boats have deck with holes in them
    I probably need a currach, now.

    Peace,
    Robert

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by timcooke View Post


    A two man Naomhóg. Oddly he is in one off Donegal(they are from Kerry)
    Just shows how far you can row in one.
    Hosted by wildlife cameraman Colin Stafford-Johnson, this two-hour show follows him on a journey along Ireland’s Atlantic coast from the southwest corner of the island to finish on the tip of Northern Ireland.
    Given enough time.

    A film crew.

    A flat bed truck, or trailer.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    RE: A Boatload of Wild Irishmen:

    WOW, were those guys good in the surf! I wish the film had just concentrated on what they were doing in the boat, rather than cutting back and forth to the kids on the beach. Very educational.

    I visited Inishmore in 1983. I saw a currach on a tiny beach on the western tip of the island. It was a bit smaller than that one, maybe 18 ft or so.
    t

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by robm View Post
    RE: A Boatload of Wild Irishmen:

    WOW, were those guys good in the surf! I wish the film had just concentrated on what they were doing in the boat, rather than cutting back and forth to the kids on the beach. Very educational.

    I visited Inishmore in 1983. I saw a currach on a tiny beach on the western tip of the island. It was a bit smaller than that one, maybe 18 ft or so.
    t
    They come in several sizes and forms. This is probably the smallest


    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Okay, where can a dummy find some more info about those fantastic oars?

    Yes, I am Google stupid, apparently.

    Peace,
    Robert

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Okay, where can a dummy find some more info about those fantastic oars?

    Yes, I am Google stupid, apparently.

    Peace,
    Robert
    Have a look at http://www.texascoritani.com/British...h_Curraghs.pdf

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Okay, where can a dummy find some more info about those fantastic oars?

    Yes, I am Google stupid, apparently.

    Peace,
    Robert
    Portland lerrets used similar oars, but with blades.



    and cobles of the NE coast used them, but put them together differently.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Thanks.

    I really want to find some hard numbers or drawings of some, if only to get a sense of proportion.
    The long, narrow blades really appeal to me.

    Peace,
    Robert

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    What a gorgeous program that was! By chance my girlfriend's 4 year old grandson woke up and came in to cuddle, and he was utterly fascinated by the creatures, and since we have been bringing toy wooden boats with us to the beach, that currach was a source of amusement to him as well. I had to explain the "flying camera" but since he has an electric helicopter toy, that wasn't a problem. The "swimming camera" was more difficult concept, though (seeing the boat row by from under water). -- Wade

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    They come in several sizes and forms. This is probably the smallest


    --- If you are ever in Ireland, visit the Newgrange Currach Centre (a couple of miles before the Newgrange Vistor Centre) where a local builder is trying to get more river currachs/coracles in use. He is experimenting with an ~ 35 foot leather currach too, on the coast. -- Wade

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Thanks.

    I really want to find some hard numbers or drawings of some, if only to get a sense of proportion.
    The long, narrow blades really appeal to me.

    Peace,
    Robert
    OK, a trawl through traditional Boats of Ireland gives two versions.
    The Dunffanaghy or Sheep Haven currach uses 10foot oars, made from a 3" x 2" batten, with the bull bored to give a 1:4 leverage at the thole pin
    The Kerry naomhog uses a 10' 6" oar made from 2 1/8" square batten, tapering down to 3/8".
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  21. #21
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    OK, a trawl through traditional Boats of Ireland gives two versions.
    The Dunffanaghy or Sheep Haven currach uses 10foot oars, made from a 3" x 2" batten, with the bull bored to give a 1:4 leverage at the thole pin
    The Kerry naomhog uses a 10' 6" oar made from 2 1/8" square batten, tapering down to 3/8".
    Oh, ho! Thanks! See, that's the type deal I can make from some boards picked out of the new shed material. Hehe.
    Any general info on the size of the bull? Guestimate is obviously going to fly for these horrid attempts.

    Peace,
    Robert

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Oh, ho! Thanks! See, that's the type deal I can make from some boards picked out of the new shed material. Hehe.
    Any general info on the size of the bull? Guestimate is obviously going to fly for these horrid attempts.

    Peace,
    Robert
    There were two sorts, smallish triangular ones


    And lumpy great big ones
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  23. #23
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Nick, those are great pictures. Thanks. It seems like a tapered stick with a bit of shape to the back of the blade area. Look sort of like a Greenland paddle with one face flattened.

    Very cool. I'll have to draw some up and make a few wee ones to check them out on some models I have.

    Thanks again.

    Peace,
    Robert

    P.S. I'm a triangle-type, I think.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Those of you interested in building a currach may be interested in the third book in three volume series titled Shipwrights: The Canvas Currach. I found this book on the remainder table outside a bookstore in Cork several years ago. It is a beautiful little book that describes how to build a currach, with plenty of photos and a narrative in both English and Irish. The copy I purchased included fold-out drawings for this interesting craft as well as a DVD showing the building process in detail. If you like Celtic music, the score on the DVD is worth the book itself. The ISBN is 0-9549023-2-7. The publisher has a webpage at http://www.tradboats.ie/publications...blications.php.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    A film that features great footage of the west coast (of Scotland in this case) is 'Local Hero'. Touching, humorous storyline, too.
    "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so."

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Currachs were built all along the west coast of Ireland, with the narrow type called the naomhog (pronounced nah-vogue) found in Kerry, where races are still held, with a famous one in Dingle Harbour.



    Here's a photo of two naomhoga, one hauling a trussed up cow from Great Blasket Island to the peninsula for breeding (no bull was kept on the island). The second boat is rescue the men in the first, in the event the cow kicks a hole in it.




    Here's a paddling currach from Donegal, similar to the one pictured.



    The illustrations are from a wonderful book:




    Here are some Kerry naomhoga on the famous pier at Dhun Chaoin (Dunquin).




    There are large, beamy currachs still used for fishing:




    We took a drive along the west coast in May 2014 and I posted a thread with heaps of pictures:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...and&highlight=
    If you welcome devils to your house, then you must feed them Afghan proverb.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so."

    -Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Moving sticks eh?



    I have another 2 pictures but been waiting 20 minutes for them to download......

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland





    No hard and fast rules i reckon, just depends on how you want them to balance.....

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    Currachs were built all along the west coast of Ireland, with the narrow type called the naomhog (pronounced nah-vogue) found in Kerry, where races are still held, with a famous one in Dingle Harbour.



    Here's a photo of two naomhoga, one hauling a trussed up cow from Great Blasket Island to the peninsula for breeding (no bull was kept on the island). The second boat is rescue the men in the first, in the event the cow kicks a hole in it.




    Here's a paddling currach from Donegal, similar to the one pictured.



    The illustrations are from a wonderful book:




    Here are some Kerry naomhoga on the famous pier at Dhun Chaoin (Dunquin).




    There are large, beamy currachs still used for fishing:




    We took a drive along the west coast in May 2014 and I posted a thread with heaps of pictures:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...and&highlight=
    --- When I visited Dunquin in 1993, a local fisherman took us out to visit Great Blasket for the afternoon (his part-time job between hauling lobster pots) and he said the "old canoes" were no longer used for fishing but most often for pleasure and racing. His boat was a rugged fiberglas work-boat with an outboard (and PFDs stuffed under several thwarts when he could get a haul of tourists). I wonder if they made a come-back later? -- Wade

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Okay, all building of boats and stuff is on hold during the construction of the new shed and shuffling of the old.

    But, much late night thinking still occurs. The first thing I do will be to make a quick set of currach style oars. I have some spare (ahem) wood I located. I'm going to try some 8 feet long with 4 foot long blades. The boat is narrow, fairly low sided, and easily driven, and already has single thole pins, so it would seem to be density, Lorraine.

    I really think the best part of these type oars are that the handles will be the most time consuming part to make. Shoot, I won't even need any electric, at all. Not even a saw or big sander for these. Sweet.

    There is a nice flat pond I plan to go row as a reward for all this working, and I am excited to try them. I think I'll use the triangular shaped bulls (I think the blocks are called...), because.

    Peace,
    Robert

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    Default Re: Coast of Ireland

    Don't forget Tim Severin's Brendan, Ireland to North America.

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    These are the starts. I chickened out on triangular blocks, and will use rectangles with rounded corners.

    Pictures of the finished product to follow...

    Peace,
    Robert

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    Upon reflection, I am going to reduce the "corners" of the blocks (bulls, whatever they are ) even more to make them balance and look better.

    I compromised on the length and placement of the thole holes. The oars will be slightly overlapped in the forward station, but just about perfect in the main position.

    I'll do the other one to match, and hopefully be able to try them out later this week, or beginning of next. No weekends for me. Too many people, yet.

    Peace,
    Thanks For The Heads Up On These!
    Last edited by amish rob; 08-14-2017 at 07:27 PM.

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    Loads of interest in my dumb larks, I know.
    This shape is better, I think. I'm going to put some trunnels through them, though the strain will came on the oars, rather than the block.
    Still. Belt and suspenders type deal, eh?

    Peace,
    Almost Done...

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