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Thread: Now here's a radical hull form

  1. #1
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    Default Now here's a radical hull form

    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Purpose?

    What are you doing about it?




  3. #3
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Dang - I didn't want to get serious so fast. It is a SWASH hull (Small Waterplane Area Single Hull) and the general idea is to create a platform that is only minimally affected by waves, as the majority of the floatation hull is beneath the waves that would toss a conventional hull around.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    gotta be a harbor pilot boat, no?
    A boatless inlander, searching for the meaning of life-aground.

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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    wait, is that a hydrofoil or will that main deck be out of the water even at full stop?

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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Dang - I didn't want to get serious so fast. It is a SWASH hull (Small Waterplane Area Single Hull) and the general idea is to create a platform that is only minimally affected by waves, as the majority of the floatation hull is beneath the waves that would toss a conventional hull around.
    Oh, right. But I'M on drugs because I draw squiggly roller skate people.

    Now you have to get really serious really fast and explain more.

    Haha.

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    Robert

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    That would be huge hit as a work boat. I've seen conventional work boats tossed around like rubber duckies out in the Gulf.

    "Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast." - Alice

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Let me guess, it can't carry too much cargo or gear since the band of allowable weight appears to be rather small - too much and she sinks to her deck and gets tossed around quite a bit by waves.

    Pilot boat?
    Will

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    No, it is not a hydrofoil - it is a full-displacement hull, sort of. I thought it was a pilot boat, too, but there are pilot boat features missing - lots of bumpers and no railings at the deck edge are normal for the type. SWATH and SWASH hulls are not very good at carrying cargo because they can't cope with the variable loading. They are excellent at tasks that require very stable decks, such as oceanographic research and crew transport. Their Achilles heel is that they have deep draft for their size.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    That's nothing more than a Chesapeake Deadrise Skiff with a fancy coat of paint!
    Rattling the teacups.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Love to see folks experimenting with hull forms. The successes are enlightening and make me smile. The (non-injury) failures are entertaining, enlightening, and make me grin. Any info on how this one is in actual use? It's certainly a fascinating contraption.
    David G
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    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    guess it's not just a CAD file



  13. #13
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Oz, you made me laugh out loud. My wife came to see what happened.

    The article about the boat in the OP - designed by Abeking & Rasmussen - is at http://articles.maritimepropulsion.c...ssen48124.aspx
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    I wonder if the engine is down in that pod, or just a gearbox?
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanMc View Post
    guess it's not just a CAD file


    OMG, the Kilingons are stealing our underwater drone!

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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form


  17. #17
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    It seems that the bilgepump manufacturers have been lobbying the design firms rather successfully.
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  18. #18
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    That's nothing more than a Chesapeake Deadrise Skiff with a fancy coat of paint!
    You, sir, win one million internets.

    What are you doing about it?




  19. #19
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Oz, you made me laugh out loud. My wife came to see what happened.

    The article about the boat in the OP - designed by Abeking & Rasmussen - is at http://articles.maritimepropulsion.c...ssen48124.aspx
    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Orca View Post
    You, sir, win one million internets.
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  20. #20
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    But I wouldn't describe you as a blind pig, Oz. Really. <grin>

    Figment, engine placement is mostly related to size - big SWATHs have the engine in the pod, smaller ones (due to space constraints) have it/them on deck level. Many years ago (1980's) I worked on a design team creating design exercises for large (300 - 400 ft LOA) SWATH ships for military use and all were designed with engines in the pod. I also did some minor design work at that time for the CCGS Frederick G. Creed (pictured below) which had its engines at main deck level.

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  21. #21
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    I haven't seen one of the tris,but I have seen one of these.



    I'm curious as to whether they behave as the promoters would have us believe.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    In my very limited experience (one day-long trials cruise on the CCGS Frederick G. Creed, I say yes. I observed a water glass filled to within a quarter-inch of the rim sitting on the flat top of the helm console while underway at twelve knots in 1.5-metre (5-foot) waves for twenty minutes and nary a drop was spilled.

    Edit to add: This video is blurry, but clear enough to see the differences in their relative motions in a seaway...

    Last edited by mmd; 08-02-2017 at 04:45 PM.
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  23. #23
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    The catamaran seems the smart way to use this idea. With the tri, there just seems to be no reserve buoyancy if something really big does try to roll the vessel.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    The catamaran seems the smart way to use this idea. With the tri, there just seems to be no reserve buoyancy if something really big does try to roll the vessel.
    On the other hand, a tri will survive damage better.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  25. #25
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    Default Re: Now here's a radical hull form

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    In my very limited experience (one day-long trials cruise on the CCGS Frederick G. Creed, I say yes. I observed a water glass filled to within a quarter-inch of the rim sitting on the flat top of the helm console while underway at twelve knots in 1.5-metre (5-foot) waves for twenty minutes and nary a drop was spilled.

    Edit to add: This video is blurry, but clear enough to see the differences in their relative motions in a seaway...

    Great video!

    I was thinking more along the lines of lateral stability with the outrigger/tri-hull design, but the lack of bow dipping, and plowing into oncoming seas in the longitudinal axis was impressive.
    "Simple minds discuss people, Average minds discuss things, and Great minds discuss ideas".

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