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Thread: Dory bottoms

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,145

    Default Dory bottoms

    In doing some repair work and refinishing for my decade or so old North Shore Dory, I've noticed that small gaps have developed between the outboard edges of the frames and the bottom. Boat is mostly overboard, six months of the year any, which means the it is gets pretty well swelled. And the dory bottom is confined by the planking so that other than the resiliency provided by caulked seams it makes sense that it would buckle some and pull away at the edges. The whole bottom is basically in compression as it works against the garboards. So the pulling away from the frames is expectable. It's not much, paper thickness maybe. It speaks to perhaps a looser fit, wider caulked seams in building. Good news is that I manage to keep things damp enough so that I haven't developed shrinkage gaps, and the compression damage to the wood has not shown up.

    I need to look at this when I am next poking around a museum collection but I am curious if any members with plank bottom dories have noticed this as well?

    PS: North Shore Dory is a 16 x 4 three plank Swampscott type, relatively straight in the first two planks, then the sheer strake going almost vertically. Wicked wide garboards. Copy of a boat in the Maine Maritime Museum collection. It was used as a recreational rowboat for years after being imported to Maine by a summer person, hence has floor boards. Like many of the dories of the era it has two tone seats, which i have emulated. Encourages people to sit in the center.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    I'll check next time I have the cover off, though my boat has been trailered for at least a decade.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    22,960

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    Ben- I saw this dory in Port Clyde. Have you ever seen it (I doubt it's a North Shore)?

    "... and the great shroud of the sea rolled on as it rolled five thousand years ago."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    Ben's North Shore Dory, TIPSY. Bigger picture here.




    That huge bottom strake threw me for a loop at the SRR when the two of Oughtred's John Dory's showed up, also exhibiting big garboards, which I found aesthetically pleasing- and interesting.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Lenox, MA/Vineyard Haven, MA
    Posts
    755

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    Just anecdotal, but I have a planked Swamspcott (Dion type) that doesn't have any of that movement, though it does have some slight curling of the bottom away from the outboard edges of the floor cleats. that is, either the cleat has moved up slightly at the ends or the floor has cupped downwards a little. It bugs me a little ...

    Then again, I had an Amesbury skiff that was terribly nail sick, had totally gone frame gussets at the chines (that I "replaced" with wooden cross spalls that sort of bridged the curve of the frame from top to floor, nailed right into the existing stuff. I was 15...) Anyway, I think dories built with real wood are pretty damn forgiving and tough, it held together fine with a 20HP Johnson on the back

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    15,186

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    Both solid wood dories that I've had have all had the bottom planks pull away from the garboards when stored dry. The white pine seemed to suffer more from the effects of compression cycles than the doug fir, but both needed a flexible caulk to stay afloat long enough to take up -- even when presoaked for a day or two.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    17,919

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    Pretty normal, the same thing happens to strip built hulls. It can be pretty dramatic on a larger vessel, I recall a Joel White ketch 40+ feet, strip built and glassed, maybe 10 years old and tight as a drum but you could fit a pencil under all the frames at the turn of the bilge. It is impossible to restrain wood from expanding in a cross grain situation, something has to give.
    I could imagine a well fitted cross planked bottom expanding in the same manner perhaps increasing the sheer just a bit!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Dory bottoms

    Canoeyawl, that's interesting, as my 49 year old strip planked ketch fits tightly to her frames. Maybe the plank species matters.
    Sorry for the thread drift.

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