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Thread: Gunter rigs

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Gunter rigs

    Hello again, can anyone explain in simple terms the difference between a Gunter and a sliding Gunter please as I'm really not sure which one I have on my tideway dinghy.
    many thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Hi,

    See http://duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/ar...nter/index.cfm for an explanation. but I think the essence is in a sliding gunter the yard slides up the mast to vertically extend the sail.

    Alan
    https://sites.google.com/site/helium12sofsailboat/

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    I THINK... that a regular Gunter has a long wire strop on the yard, so the sail cane be reefed without touching the peak halyard. That was how my old Mumbles YC One Design (wonderful boat!) worked. I THINK that a sliding Gunter has traveller that closes round the mast to keep the yard right in line with the mast. But I've never had one of those.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Quote Originally Posted by SNAPMAN View Post
    Hi,

    See http://duckworksmagazine.com/04/s/ar...nter/index.cfm for an explanation. but I think the essence is in a sliding gunter the yard slides up the mast to vertically extend the sail.

    Alan
    https://sites.google.com/site/helium12sofsailboat/
    For added clarity, a sliding gunter has a mast ring at the halyard as well as gaff jaws so that the sail cannot sag off as it will with any slack in the peak halyard span. The spar literally slides up and down the mast constrained at two places.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    I THINK... that a regular Gunter has a long wire strop on the yard, so the sail cane be reefed without touching the peak halyard. That was how my old Mumbles YC One Design (wonderful boat!) worked. I THINK that a sliding Gunter has traveller that closes round the mast to keep the yard right in line with the mast. But I've never had one of those.
    ACB, How was the peal halyard span tensioned? Did yours sag off much when the halyard was at its middle for a first reef?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Sliding gunther:



    The gunther iron, or gunther brace, is the difference.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    ACB, How was the peal halyard span tensioned? Did yours sag off much when the halyard was at its middle for a first reef?
    The mainsail was cut to give about a five degree angle from the mast. This was enough to keep the sail in shape. Of course, when you were close reefed, the halyard war at the top of the span and that brought the yard to the mast and flattened the sail which was what you wanted in a stronger wind!
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    The mainsail was cut to give about a five degree angle from the mast. This was enough to keep the sail in shape. Of course, when you were close reefed, the halyard war at the top of the span and that brought the yard to the mast and flattened the sail which was what you wanted in a stronger wind!
    Sounds as though I have to give up the first reef.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Sounds as though I have to give up the first reef.
    Like this:





    I wish I could find that boat; I would buy her back in a flash. She taught me an awful lot.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Good solid boat, a little bit cods heady but a nice long run.
    The mainsail is very similar to Peerie Maa's. The double forestay looks a bit odd by today's standards.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    She didn't actually have the double forestay. The mainsail was as you see and reefing was not a problem.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Emerald Coast, FL
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    Wikipedia may have your answer...Gunter

    And then there are single gunters and double gunters...




  13. #13
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    Default Re: Gunter rigs

    The Tideway has a regular gunter rig, sometimes even classified as a "folding gunter" for clarity. The gunter spar will come down, pivot at the mast and lie on top of the boom when lowered. You will find that a lot of people will mistakenly call it a sliding gunter, since when being raised, the jaws slide up the mast, but on a real sliding gunter the top section stays vertical at all times and simply climbs up and down the aft side of the mast. Real sliding gunters are pretty rare these days.

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