Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 123 ... LastLast
Results 36 to 70 of 125

Thread: How to restore this rot?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    23,334

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Wish my recent repair job had been as simple as this.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Great, the explanation on the epoxy clarified things nicely. After many phone calls found a place in town that has a kit that's around half a litre once mixed with the hardener, which I hope would be enough to lay close to 3m worth of tape for this project. Price isn't bad at $47Can and it's available locally: http://goindustrial.ca/index.php/en/...ld-cure-detail
    However they also seem to have the System 3 as well. The only place in town that sells West System epoxy only sells them in large quantities (never even knew we had a Lee Valley here). Today I bought the plywood and should pick up the epoxy shortly.

    But there's one thing I noticed that I should get your opinion on: should I give the raw plywood a couple of coats of varnish, in order to match the rest of the floor? As mentioned earlier, it looks like there's a good layer of varnish under the white paint. Would you folks think it'd be wise to varnish the new piece once it's been cut? Just want to cover all these details ahead of time in order to avoid any pitfalls.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    by the way, you want woven or sewn fibreglass or fibreglass-tape, not "chopped strand mat" which is cut fibres pressed together to a certain thickness.
    Glad you clarified that, it was my next question. The place that sells the epoxy sells the tape by the metre and it's dirt cheap (suppose I'd go for the 4"). Bit surprised that cloth is preferable to CSM as I thought CSM provides water proofing. But since cloth is easier to work with, I'm not questioning the process, just seems like an odd choice.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    374

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    But there's one thing I noticed that I should get your opinion on: should I give the raw plywood a couple of coats of varnish, in order to match the rest of the floor? As mentioned earlier, it looks like there's a good layer of varnish under the white paint. Would you folks think it'd be wise to varnish the new piece once it's been cut? Just want to cover all these details ahead of time in order to avoid any pitfalls.

    Glad you clarified that, it was my next question. The place that sells the epoxy sells the tape by the metre and it's dirt cheap (suppose I'd go for the 4"). Bit surprised that cloth is preferable to CSM as I thought CSM provides water proofing. But since cloth is easier to work with, I'm not questioning the process, just seems like an odd choice.
    Joolz, you do want the plywood protected, and of course not to look too different to the rest. There are folks who spread 2 or 3 layers of epoxy on their plywood, but in this case your half a litre of Epoxy won't be enough. If you don't use Epoxy, wait with it till you've completely finished your repair. Then you can apply paint or varnish. In case you might later one day want to take her back to a wooden surface it would be better to have 2 coats of varnish first and then the wite paint. This is because the white paint will be soaked into the surface and it's next to impossible to get rid of it completely. Were we talking about wood, one can sand a bit further down, something you can't do with plywood as the layers are so thin. If you can't see yourself ever wishing to do this, no need to use varnish.

    With CSM and woven fibreglass: to make something watertight, you use Epoxy Resin. To bond something watertight together, you use Epoxy with fibreglass. Now imagine a haystack on one side, and a blanket on the other side. You pull at the blanket and the whole thing comes towards you. Pull at fibres in the haystack and a few fibres will come to you. CSM adds thickness, but has no strength. To get strength you need woven fibreglass. Have a look when you get the stuff: there does exist +/- 45 * bidiagonal fibreglass tape (fiberglass-tape where the fibres are sown together and cross each other in a 45 * angle), this is the strongest in fibreglass you can get at the moment. If they have that, use this. If they don't, the plain woven also does the job although the other is better.
    Last edited by Dody; 08-02-2017 at 04:07 AM.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    374

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    I forgot to mention something: Epoxy in it's original state is not UV-resistant. Just in case you would like to use it as the final coat on the outside, you would need to add an additive for UV-protection. I guess each of the Epoxy-manufacturers offer something for their particular product.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    The explanations are much appreciated, understanding the science behind the fix helps understand how it was built and the reasons behind a proper fix. Thanks for that.
    Proof of this is how you mentioned that epoxy is often used on the outside of the plywood - which now has me thinking that perhaps this is what was used in this little boat. A close inspection of the coating shows it to be rather hard. It almost looks like a thin sheet of very hard plastic. My guess it that it's about .2mm thick. Realizing what you said, it has me thinking that this is not varnish. Which would make sense, seeing how epoxy would provide a barrier against moisture. Another reason why it has me thinking this to be epoxy and not varnish is how well the white paint sticks to it. In my experience paint would not stick this well to varnish. Took a pic showing a close up of the sheen. Don't expect anyone to discern what coating was used here based on a crappy pic but perhaps for the trained eye it may provide a hint.



    If epoxy was used here I think it'd make sense to stick to the same process in my replacement plywood. The piece in question is only 32" x 13". Do you still think that half a litre of the epoxy not to be sufficient to cover this twice plus the nearly 3 metres I'd be using for the tape? If so then I may have to look at getting a larger quantity.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Grosse Pointe, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    13,078

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    I don't really know why you would want to restore rot. I usually try to get rid of it.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    374

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    The explanations are much appreciated, understanding the science behind the fix helps understand how it was built and the reasons behind a proper fix. Thanks for that.
    Proof of this is how you mentioned that epoxy is often used on the outside of the plywood - which now has me thinking that perhaps this is what was used in this little boat. A close inspection of the coating shows it to be rather hard. It almost looks like a thin sheet of very hard plastic. My guess it that it's about .2mm thick. Realizing what you said, it has me thinking that this is not varnish. Which would make sense, seeing how epoxy would provide a barrier against moisture. Another reason why it has me thinking this to be epoxy and not varnish is how well the white paint sticks to it. In my experience paint would not stick this well to varnish. Took a pic showing a close up of the sheen. Don't expect anyone to discern what coating was used here based on a crappy pic but perhaps for the trained eye it may provide a hint.

    If epoxy was used here I think it'd make sense to stick to the same process in my replacement plywood. The piece in question is only 32" x 13". Do you still think that half a litre of the epoxy not to be sufficient to cover this twice plus the nearly 3 metres I'd be using for the tape? If so then I may have to look at getting a larger quantity.
    It is very difficult to say what it was. I can see in your picture 2 white flakes of paint sticking up, maybe, if you take them somewhere with really good light and have a look at the underside. Varnish nearly always has something to protect the wood against UV, which makes it look clear, but when it sticks to white you will notice that the white is not really white any more. Should the white on the flakes have a bit of a different colour, we can be sure it's not Epoxy but varnish. In the other case we still don't know for sure.

    I didn't realize we're talking that small - had to get my calculater out coz I'm terrible with inches, and had to have a look at my mixing-cups to see how high half a litre would get in them. When your plywood doesn't soak it up too much, and if the epoxy you buy is not very thin, half a litre could be enough. To be on the safe side I would do the repair first and then use what is left.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Brought a sample to a paint store, guy there seems to concur it to be epoxy and not varnish. As you said Dody, will lay down the FB and use what's left of the epoxy to coat the new piece (which btw is only .85 x .35m). With that said, have a question on fitting the new piece: despite my best efforts I wasn't able to make a clean cut, courtesy of the keel batten that kinda got in the way. There's a bit of a gap as seen in the pic. What's the best way to fill this? Do I just epoxy resin? Waterproof glue? Or either of the 3M products shown in the pic? That 5200 sealer is good stuff, have used it in the past, as is the marine filler as both provide great water proofing.

    As for installing the newly cut piece of plywood, waterproof glue was mentioned in this thread and I'd imagine it would be easier to use than the epoxy resin (less messy, greater working time, easier to clean up). Have not yet secured the new piece of plywood in place, would like clarification on this before proceeding. I have a container of Gorilla wood glue that's type 1 water resistant. Right stuff or should I stick to the epoxy resin? Or is there a better glue for the purpose?

    Getting there, folks. Worst is behind, now just a matter of following the right steps.


  9. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    374

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    I'm a bit confused now about your question and your planned proceedings.

    My way of dealing with the repair would have been to Epoxy-tape on the inside. Let it harden. Turn the boat over. Use thickened Epoxy to fill the gap. Let it harden, sand it, Epoxy-tape it. Once this is done I would have Epoxy-glued a butt from the inside. In this case the only thing missing for the job would be something to thicken the Epoxy to use as a filler. What would you like to do with the products you mention?

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    I was basing the next few steps on Nick's and Amish Rob's suggestions. Unless I'm mistaken, there's no mention of adding tape to the inside - although it makes sense IMO. As an added bonus, it would allow me to turn the boat around and fill the gap with epoxy (with whatever filler it needs). As a newbie I'm eagerly learning from the experts but I too am a bit confused on how to proceed with adding the cut piece of virgin plywood. This afternoon I bought a few stainless steel screws, 3/8" in length, which should allow me to use a piece of the quarter inch (6mm) plywood as a butt plate and screw it to the floor for added strength. I was under the impression I'd be adding epoxy or waterproof glue in between the butt plate and the floor. Hadn't considered taping the inside till you mentioned it. Suppose there's no harm in taping the inside and adding the butt plate on top of it?

    If someone can please point me to where I can find the filler to harden the epoxy, I'll just use it to fill the gap, as Dody mentioned. I only listed the 3M stuff in the pic as that's what I have at hand. But here willing to listen to suggestions. Kinda of a crucial step this next one, so want to ensure I do it right.

    Edited to add pic

    Last edited by Joolz; 08-03-2017 at 09:39 PM.

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,615

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    Brought a sample to a paint store, guy there seems to concur it to be epoxy and not varnish. As you said Dody, will lay down the FB and use what's left of the epoxy to coat the new piece (which btw is only .85 x .35m). With that said, have a question on fitting the new piece: despite my best efforts I wasn't able to make a clean cut, courtesy of the keel batten that kinda got in the way. There's a bit of a gap as seen in the pic. What's the best way to fill this? Do I just epoxy resin? Waterproof glue? Or either of the 3M products shown in the pic? That 5200 sealer is good stuff, have used it in the past, as is the marine filler as both provide great water proofing.

    As for installing the newly cut piece of plywood, waterproof glue was mentioned in this thread and I'd imagine it would be easier to use than the epoxy resin (less messy, greater working time, easier to clean up). Have not yet secured the new piece of plywood in place, would like clarification on this before proceeding. I have a container of Gorilla wood glue that's type 1 water resistant. Right stuff or should I stick to the epoxy resin? Or is there a better glue for the purpose?

    Getting there, folks. Worst is behind, now just a matter of following the right steps.

    You could use that £M filler to fill the gap. For bluing use epoxy, priming with unthickened epoxy, and then gluing ith epoxy thickened with wood flour or cotton fibre dust available from the epoxy supplier.
    For laying up the glass tape use the resin neat.
    There is nothing wrong with Dody's suggestion, but it is over kill.

    Glue the new panel on. Then flip the boat and glue on the butt block. Then flip her back and fill the gap with thickened epoxy, then lay up the tape.
    I see that you have not buffed of the paint from the old bottom yet. Have you cleaned the varnish off from the inside yet? You could use some other waterproof glue, but epoxy is bomb proof, gap filling (which other glues are not) and you will be buying it to lay up the tape anyway. I would prime the ply under the keel batten whilst it is off the boat. That will make it easier to epoxy glue the batten back down.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Great tip to apply epoxy to the panel where the keel batten sits against. Did that just now (purchased the System 3 this afternoon). Only mixed a small amount but had some left over, so I applied it to most of the bare wood, especially where it looks rough and very dry, including the edges of the floor where the new plywood butts against the old. Hopefully this will seal the wood a bit, providing better adhesion once the panel goes on (will let it sit for a day or two to fully cure)

    Surprised by how thick the stuff is. Has the consistency of liquid honey. Had to use an old tooth brush as a normal paint brush wouldn't cut it. May prove a bit tricky applying this to the tape, as I understand I must soak it good. Thankfully I only have small sections to do, so I should be able to do it with plenty of time till it hardens to the point it's unusable (think around 35 minutes). Is there a way to thin it a bit? I saw a thinner at the store but due to this being a long weekend, they won't open till Tuesday. Any way to thin this safely other than buying the OEM stuff? For the record, this is the Cold Cure from System 3 (mix 2 parts to 1 of the hardener).

    I scraped off the paint last night, used rags soaked with boiling water to soften the paint a bit, then scraped it off with a patty knife. All is good to go, once this cures I plan to add a bit of that 3M filler to a couple of the corners. Then on to phase 2.

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    9,902

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Nothing more to add but encouragement. Keep it up!

    Peace,
    Robert

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    spicewood, texas, usa
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    sounds like you went to school on boat repair. good job so far and thx for sharing all of this with us.

    jim

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Yep, this is actually quite simple. Hardest part was getting my head around all the unfamiliar products and procedures. Now that I have gathered all the material and sponged up all the expert advice, it's coming along smoothly.
    Oh and as for thinning the epoxy, I found the answer to that here: http://epoxyworks.com/index.php/thin...-system-epoxy/

    Pretty much a bad idea. So will stick with the thick stuff and apply it as best as possible.
    Who knew working in a wood boat could actually be fun?
    K, may have spoken too soon: on my way to buying a roll of sand paper. Much sanding/scraping to do to remove the old varnish. This part ain't gonna be fun.

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,506

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Nice work Joolz. And yes, working on wood boats is definitely fun! Maybe not the sanding part, true, but it will go faster than you think.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,615

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    K, may have spoken too soon: on my way to buying a roll of sand paper. Much sanding/scraping to do to remove the old varnish. This part ain't gonna be fun.
    You only need to get down to bare wood where you will be applying epoxy. If the rest of the varnish is solid and adhering well, just roughen and clean it and re-varnish over the top. No point in taking off sound paint or varnish only to put more back.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Covered in dust as I type this, due to all the sanding that I just now finished. Before I head to the shower, wanted to mention this: there is no varnish. The guy that built the skiff used epoxy everywhere with no apparent coats of varnish to protect the epoxy from the sun. Think this is a big mistake and proof of this is how bad it looks, as seen in the pics I posted at the start of this thread. Lacking UV protection, the condition inside the boat should be proof that using a varnish with UV protection to be mandatory. If I was to build a boat someday, I'd forgo the epoxy inside the boat and stick to several coats of varnish. So yeah, impossible to sand it down completely, so I just scuffed it up as best as possible, using both an electric sander and by hand.

    Plan now is to use a decent oil based varnish. A local company makes the traditional stuff, similar to the ones where in the US you can only buy by the litre (although that may be reversed since Trump killed the EPA). Will just get a litre, which should allow me to give it 3 to 4 coats, no point in buying a gallon since you can't keep varnish for long. Don't expect it to look good as portions of the inside have anywhere from thick coats of epoxy to thin, to none (where the sun faded it off completely). The varnish will likely change the colour slightly as it hits bare wood and whatever may happen when it goes atop the epoxy. So I expect a rather uneven finish. Truly not worried how it looks like, my only concern is with functionality. If I was anal about it, I'd spend the next month carefully removing the epoxy in order to get an even finish. Would be faster to build a new boat from scratch.

    Despite my mediocre attempts at measuring the resin/hardener, the bit that I mixed and applied 2 days ago is now rock solid. Stuff truly is amazing. Plan tomorrow is to install the new plywood, something I was planning on doing tonight but run out of sunlight. Really glad I listened to you guys, this process is turning out to be sound (and fun!)
    Last edited by Joolz; 08-07-2017 at 01:04 AM.

  19. #54
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,615

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post

    Despite my mediocre attempts at measuring the resin/hardener, the bit that I mixed and applied 2 days ago is now rock solid. Stuff truly is amazing. Plan tomorrow is to install the new plywood, something I was planning on doing tonight but run out of sunlight. Really glad I listened to you guys, this process is turning out to be sound (and fun!)
    Don't forget to check for amine blush. Your resin might not produce one, but if it does you will need to wash it off. Check the instructions on the tin.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    I had no idea of this, thanks so much for mentioning it. Could have been a great way to ruin all this work, had I applied varnish atop this blush. I already sanded the bit that I applied epoxy to, so I can't check to see if it has the blush. Thankfully our weather is so dry, it's a desert here (words my kids' dermatologist uses) and since it's warm out, hopefully I won't have a problem with this. But to be on the safe side I'll be scrubbing all surfaces with soapy water once cured, between every coat.

    Below is a pic of the boat after it's been sanded. Looks same as before, seeing how its all expoxied up and no way I'd attempt to remove it, so instead sanded it as best as I could in order to allow the varnish to adhere properly (fingers crossed). Expect the varnish coats to do little to improve the looks, although a bit of sheen ought to help. Oddly enough just a moment ago my 7 year old said how pretty the boat looks. Well, that's a great feedback and just added to my desire to fix this properly. Anyway, wanted to post this to discourage anyone from just applying epoxy resin instead of varnish or any type of UV protection. Our geographical position equates to destructive UV rays that are killer on most things. My window sills are proof. Careful when choosing a varnish as not all has UV blockers.



  21. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,615

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Amine Blush is not what you apparently think it is.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    New bottom in, also added the butt-joint with an overkill amount of screws. 25 to be exact. Figured might as well be safe (with a decent amount of waterproof glue in between the plies). As far as covering the screw heads, is this Minwax a good option? They will be covered with the tape/epoxy under the boat but not where the butt-joint is. No idea how long this needs in order to cure. If there's a better option would like to know. Was hoping to do the taping tonight, but first need to cover these screw holes. If someone could weigh in shortly, that'd be great.



    Last edited by Joolz; 08-08-2017 at 08:18 PM.

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
    Posts
    374

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    New bottom in, also added the butt-joing with an overkill amount of screws. 25 to be exact. Figured might as well be safe (with a decent amount of waterproof glue in between the plies). As far as covering the screw heads, is this Minwax a good option? They will be covered with the tape/epoxy under the boat but not where the butt-joint is.. No idea how long this needs in order to cure. If there's a better option would like to know. Was hoping to do the taping tonight, but first need to cover these screw holes. If someone could weigh in shortly, that'd be great.
    Joolz, Putty is a great thing, but I don't think the Epoxy will like it as - to my knowledge - it contains oils and doesn't get hard. Also the mentioning of Wax in the name of the product is a no no. Best thing would be Epoxy-Filler. Second-best-thing, as Epoxy sticks to Polyester, you could use Polyester-Filler. You also could use what you have and mix up a small amount of Epoxy, mix it with sawdust to the point where it gets really thick. If you haven't got sawdust, you can use talkum (remember, Baby-powder?), I've even heard from people using ordinary flour, but I haven't tried it.

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    11,784

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Just use glass cloth and epoxy resin. Its not a dining table.

  25. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,506

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Joolz, the 3M Marine Filler you have is the perfect thing to fill the screw holes. Just use that. Problem solved!
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    csstevens, beat you to it: that's exactly what I did, following dody's heads up. Only downside of the 3M filler is that it is white(ish), but seeing how the butt-joint will be partially hidden by the rear bench, I'm not too concerned with it. That 3M filler is coming handy for other spots in the boat that could use attention. After doing some restoration work in my 15' FB outboard I quickly became fan of the stuff. Pricey but a huge time saver.
    Run out of sunlight again but all is in place for taping/epoxing it tomorrow.

    Thanks for the quick responses. You guys saved me from a potential small disaster. Will be returning that Minwax to Home Depot.

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Just use glass cloth and epoxy resin. Its not a dining table.
    Fraid I need to be extremely careful using the little bit of epoxy I have. Hoping the 12oz kit I got will be enough to do the taping and a couple of coats onto the bottom of the new plywood. Wifey won't be too pleased if I'm to spend another $50 on more epoxy. She's well aware of the costs our main boat incur, on a regular basis so I'm trying to keep the peace by keeping costs of this project to a minimum. It's like she said, I needed another boat like I needed a kick to the... And I'm sure she'd happily fulfill that prophecy if I go too much over budget. Ouch.

  28. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Some additional prep work prevented me from taping, plan is to do it this afternoon. But one thing came to mind and would like your opinion: is there really a need to tape the seam where the new plywood meets the old? Would think that keeping things as flat as possible to be the ideal scenario. But looking at this joint, where I applied a few layers of 3M Marine filler, it appears to be extremely fit. As seen in the previous pics, went overkill with the butt-joint. Flipped boat over and filled the gap with 3M filler. Then a couple more thin layers to ensure things were as smooth as possible, it now makes me wonder if I could just leave it as is? (naturally I plan to apply several coats of marine paint). Not sure there'd be much drag from having tape over that area, but if the consensus is that it's safe to do without the taping, great. If you folks think it'd be wiser to tape it up and put up with the bit of an uneven surface, that'd be just as dandy. Just hoping for clarification before taking the next step.


  29. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,506

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    That looks great to me Joolz! I'd be tempted to try it without the tape for now. Worst that would happen is that it might leak a bit with some use I'd think. And then if you like the boat and decide to keep it you might want to just fiberglass the entire bottom. In any case it won't hurt anything to throw it in the water right as it is now and see if it floats. But that's one opinion. You might get better advice from Nick and others here.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,615

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    If you have used a really good waterproof glue to attach the butt block it will probably be OK.

    Sand it fair, tape the seams and re-glue the keel batten. Then you will know how greedy the process is and whether you will have enough resin in hand to tape it.
    It will be stronger and more durable with, but OK without. As Phil says it is not a dining table, bit it is what comes between you and an unplanned swim.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Thanks guys, guess by your responses that having a bit of an uneven surface (think 2mm) due to the FB tape to not be much of an issue huh? Mainly worried about it producing additional drag. I'm sure I'll have enough resin and tape to cover the area, the main concern was having a bit of a bump and the added drag. But since speed boat this ain't I suppose it's a non issue. Heck, I can always feather the tape out using the 3M filler once everything is cured.

    K, will proceed as before. Like you said, best to be safe - and if it requires a bit of additional muscle power to push this thing along, I'll just chuck that up to added fitness bonus.

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,506

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    Thanks guys, guess by your responses that having a bit of an uneven surface (think 2mm) due to the FB tape to not be much of an issue huh? Mainly worried about it producing additional drag. I'm sure I'll have enough resin and tape to cover the area, the main concern was having a bit of a bump and the added drag. But since speed boat this ain't I suppose it's a non issue. Heck, I can always feather the tape out using the 3M filler once everything is cured.

    K, will proceed as before. Like you said, best to be safe - and if it requires a bit of additional muscle power to push this thing along, I'll just chuck that up to added fitness bonus.
    Drag won't be an issue. You wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    34,615

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Drag won't be an issue. You wouldn't be able to tell the difference.
    Just so. Those skiffs are not called flat irons for nothing.
    If you want a skiff with low drag, you need something like this:
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    9,902

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joolz View Post
    Thanks guys, guess by your responses that having a bit of an uneven surface (think 2mm) due to the FB tape to not be much of an issue huh? Mainly worried about it producing additional drag. I'm sure I'll have enough resin and tape to cover the area, the main concern was having a bit of a bump and the added drag. But since speed boat this ain't I suppose it's a non issue. Heck, I can always feather the tape out using the 3M filler once everything is cured.

    K, will proceed as before. Like you said, best to be safe - and if it requires a bit of additional muscle power to push this thing along, I'll just chuck that up to added fitness bonus.
    If you put a piece of plastic sheet (like a shower curtain, say) over the wetted FG tape, and squeegee over that, the tape will be almost unnoticeable. No hard bump. Really.

    Peace,
    Robert

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: How to restore this rot?

    Ok, will do that. Bought a small roller that I think would work nicely to press against the plastic (which I also plan to use on the sides to ensure all is neat and tidy). Else I'll use a small scraper to squeeze out the excess resin and ensure all is compressed nicely. But how long do I wait till I pull the plastic off? I'd think that waiting till the epoxy cures would make it impossible to pull it off, or is this not the case?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •