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Thread: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

  1. #1
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    Default Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    So Denise030 asked if I was going to document my Guillemot build. I'm not a very public person and am quite an antisocial social media user, so publicly documenting this gives me a "walking naked down the street" feeling... I'm sure there are and will be many things I get wrong. Many obvious routes to success will be missed and silly mistakes made. Hopefully people will be kind and developmental and patient. I don't know how long this will take, but having been sailing on Windermere last week and seen a beautiful little clinker built dinghy out on the water, I'm itching to get cracking.

    I've bugged a number of you over the last months. At first it was "should I build a Melonseed?" Then came the "can I use my dad's old aluminium mast on a melonseed?" question. Finally I discovered Iain Oughtred's designs. I convinced myself I could fit a Tammie Norrie in the garage and then saw sense and decided to jump in and go for the Guillemot instead.

    So I bought the plans directly from Iain and they're every bit as beautiful as people had told me they'd be. And, to a beginner like me, every bit as baffling as I expected! I'd helped my dad build a Mirror dinghy as a teenager (hence the aluminium mast question) and remembered that being pretty straightforward, so to see some real plans was a wake up call...

    As I am a bit tight on space, I decided to start with parts that could be hung up out of the way. That meant jumping in to the spars and rudder and centreboard.

    I found some Douglas Fir in a local timber yard and, having watched a bzillion videos of what to do (Marcus Lewis and Paul Sellers and Louis Sauzedde mainly) set to with a plane in my hand for the first time in probably 25 years. I'm quite pleased with my work, although the foot of the mast somehow ended up not quite round and the tapers don't stand up to too close scrutiny. As I don't really know how good is good enough, I'm going with as good as my skill will allow will have to do. I'm sure I'll be remaking things a lot as I move along!







    One of the sets of parts that caused me much head scratching were the jaws for the boom and yard. I had my own ideas, but then was handed (electronically) a set of drawings by Jim Ledger to produce jaws properly. I laminated some European oak and scratched my head before cutting out the tricky 3D shapes and then shaping and rasping and sanding until I got something that looked decent. At first, I was going to glue and screw the jaws on, but then decided to learn how to copper rivet. I couldn't find copper nails long enough to go through the spars and the jaws, so bought some copper rod and roves. After work hardening the middle of the copper rod and somehow managing to get all the holes to line up, I glued and riveted the jaws on. Again, the riveting might not pass close inspection, but I'm pleased with it and have my fingers crossed.









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  2. #2
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    After the spars, I turned to the rudder and centreboard. One thing I've found is that there are many many ways of doing almost everything and I pondered for a long time over how to proceed. In the end, I opted for laminated Sapele. A different timber yard this time. Lots of advice from people on here and some more amateurish planing later, I have a rudder blade and centreboard partly completed. I still need to drill and paint the centreboard and make up the "non-raising" bits of the rudder (cheeks?).







    Next weekend, I'm going to pick up some CNC cut planks from Alec at Jordan Boats in Somerset. He's been very helpful and I hope that having pre-cut planks will help a lot. Especially in my slightly tight building space. Anyway, I needed to bite the bullet and build the building frame. Iain suggests a big 1/2" ply coffin. I couldn't get 1/2" ply (must be a high demand coffin week) so went for 3/4" instead. I miscalculated a few dimensions so it's not perfect, but I now have a square and level and rollable 12' long building frame. It seems heavy duty and pretty damn rigid, so hopefully it'll prove to be a substantial and solid foundation for the boat. Fingers crossed.





    So that's where I am for now. It feels like things are going along well (thanks to all those who've helped with advice) but work is so busy I have really only managed a few snuck hours here and there, so progress also feels irritatingly slow. I'll keep updating this thread as thing happen and when questions occur to me.


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  3. #3
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    Oh, I made a little cleat too. 😁



    It turns out the cleat drawings in Iain's book shrank in the wash... 😆


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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    Very nice work! Keep the photos comin'...
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    Cool beans RC! I was asking you if you were going to build the boat per the specifications on the plan. But seeing this proves you have understated your webmaster abilities! Great photos!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  6. #6
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    Thanks both... All done with an iPhone...! 😁

    I have a question about the apron/inner stem...

    I think I'm probably going to find life easier to glue planks together rather than laminate. I don't have the equipment...

    Having spent an hour or so with the plans, it seems the keelson stock is the same dimensions (siding and moulding) as those Iain suggests for the apron. It lays out ok, so I reckon it must be alright. Butttt.... Overlapping the joints in the planks only gives a finished overlap area about 3" ish long. I suppose what I mean is that the joint between planks on one side will be about 3" max from the joint on the other side. At the inner face, it's only 1/2". Hopefully the photo makes some sense of what I mean.

    I'm not sure it's going to really matter when it's lathered up with epoxy, but it is a reasonably important bit to get right. Assuming my previous thoughts of crooks and laminations don't come to pass, would this layout of overlapping planks be ok?



    Thanks for your help...! 😁


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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    Quote Originally Posted by Racundra View Post
    Thanks both... All done with an iPhone...! 

    I have a question about the apron/inner stem...

    I think I'm probably going to find life easier to glue planks together rather than laminate. I don't have the equipment...

    Having spent an hour or so with the plans, it seems the keelson stock is the same dimensions (siding and moulding) as those Iain suggests for the apron. It lays out ok, so I reckon it must be alright. Butttt.... Overlapping the joints in the planks only gives a finished overlap area about 3" ish long. I suppose what I mean is that the joint between planks on one side will be about 3" max from the joint on the other side. At the inner face, it's only 1/2". Hopefully the photo makes some sense of what I mean.

    I'm not sure it's going to really matter when it's lathered up with epoxy, but it is a reasonably important bit to get right. Assuming my previous thoughts of crooks and laminations don't come to pass, would this layout of overlapping planks be ok?



    Thanks for your help...! 


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    Are you saying you do not have a table saw? Looking at your stem drawing reminds me to get cracking on making them for my Ducker.. something I don't have to do out in the heat and sun.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Are you saying you do not have a table saw? Looking at your stem drawing reminds me to get cracking on making them for my Ducker.. something I don't have to do out in the heat and sun.


    Erm, nope. I have a saw and a table though... I could probably get access to a table saw...


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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    Interesting.. but looking at some of the work you have been producing by (only?) hand tools is quite inspiring. I have an complete, but mostly unused shop with all the machines old and new. It's been near impossible to re-motivate myself since my son is gone from the whole scheme of things. Lately been cranking stuff our on the wood lathe but would still rather be wooden boat anything.

    When I was a shop volunteer in the Phila pa boat museum I saw a few boats built entirely with hand tools. and the shop machines gathered dust.

    Carry on!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Interesting.. but looking at some of the work you have been producing by (only?) hand tools is quite inspiring. I have an complete, but mostly unused shop with all the machines old and new. It's been near impossible to re-motivate myself since my son is gone from the whole scheme of things. Lately been cranking stuff our on the wood lathe but would still rather be wooden boat anything.

    When I was a shop volunteer in the Phila pa boat museum I saw a few boats built entirely with hand tools. and the shop machines gathered dust.

    Carry on!


    Haha! Well cutting those oak jaws using a coping saw was tedious and tricky work... watching people online using electric tools makes things look easy. Easy to screw up too of course!


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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    Do you have "Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual?" Iain's book?

    I'm not sure I understand the question. There is an inner stem (apron) which gets bevelled to accept the planks, then after planking you attach an outer stem, like in the bird's eye view in the drawing above. The thickness of the apron blank should be the thickness of the aft end of the finished piece.

    I laminated mine for my Whilly boat, but have since done the overlapping straight pieces to make up a blank for my current build. That one was three layers of 3/4" Doug fir.

    The stuff you've done so far looks great!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon1 View Post
    Do you have "Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual?" Iain's book?

    I'm not sure I understand the question. There is an inner stem (apron) which gets bevelled to accept the planks, then after planking you attach an outer stem, like in the bird's eye view in the drawing above. The thickness of the apron blank should be the thickness of the aft end of the finished piece.

    I laminated mine for my Whilly boat, but have since done the overlapping straight pieces to make up a blank for my current build. That one was three layers of 3/4" Doug fir.

    The stuff you've done so far looks great!

    Mike


    Thanks Mike! 😊

    I'm planning on splitting the apron in half, with the joins offset on each half. Iain does describe this in his book. What I'm unsure of is whether the relative positions of the joins on the left and right of the boat matters so long as they don't fall in the same place. The red and blue on that image show where the two pieces would fall. On one side the join would be on the top of the red piece and on the other it'd be at the left edge of the blue piece. The joins will be offset, but not by much... it's the distance of this offset that concerns me...

    Thanks


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  13. #13
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    Ok, so I spoke to the timber yard today and DF isn't available. Iroko has been suggested for the transom, keelson/hog and apron/stem. I think I'm going to be a grown up and laminate the apron/stem after all. My question is therefore: is iroko ok for those parts?

    Thanks


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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    Your workmanship so far is excellent. I've no doubt this boat will come out just fine. Carry on!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Your workmanship so far is excellent. I've no doubt this boat will come out just fine. Carry on!


    Very kind Rich. Thank you! 😊


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  16. #16
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    So I've been practising planing 40mm scarfs in some scrap okume 6mm ply... a few dodgy mishaps but the last couple of attempts went quite well (I think...).

    You have to focus quite hard on not planing off the edge on the bottom piece at the same time as not planing back beyond the "mark" for the end of the scarf of the top piece...

    Assuming there isn't enough scrap ply in the world for me to practise enough to aim for a bright-finished boat, how good is "good enough" for a scarf joint?

    This is what I've got so far:

    Attempt 1 - lost edge of bottom piece.



    Attempt 2 - bit of drift back over the line on the top piece.



    You can see the widths of each ply isn't matched on its opposite half. Does this matter? (Is this what thickened epoxy will take care of?)



    Thanks (again...!)


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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Land-locked Yorkshire Guillemot

    That last one should be ok.Why don't you glue it and show us how it turns out?I find an offcut of melamine faced chipboard is pretty good at spreading the force and ensuring a flat surface.The other part of the battle is to ensure the sections don't skid around.

  18. #18
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    So I think more practice is needed... From one side, the joint is pretty smooth - I can only just feel it. From the other side, there's a 1/16" gap/dip at the joint where I must have drifted back from the line when I was planing. I imagine it'd fill pretty well and end up invisible if I paint it, but does it matter structurally?

    Here are a few shots:

    1. Pretty level and smooth:


    2. Not all that visible either:


    3. But the other side has a dip:


    4. And it's fair to say it's quite visible:


    Thanks for all comments... 😮


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