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Thread: Muri-Maru, a 17' 5" birdwing Yangtze Pelican microcruiser

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    558

    Default Re: Muri-Maru, a 17' 5" birdwing Yangtze Pelican microcruiser

    Yes, I remember now the reason for the expensive hardware: The masts on Time and Tide were tilted forward to bring the ce more forward and when running the booms would have dipped in the water. Kees needed another NA to solve the problem. Btw I did not accuse you of anything, just found the coincidence interesting, and I like your boat. Frank

  2. #107
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
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    3,488

    Default Re: Muri-Maru, a 17' 5" birdwing Yangtze Pelican microcruiser

    I was surprised as well when I read Iain's letter and examined the Xerox copies of the Time and Tide participating in a raid event that he sent me. Both of our designs address the same problem of having mast in the way when fishing, picnicking or rowing. Both designs strive to keep the cockpit area open so maybe not a huge coincedence that they are similar. I'm still looking for a way of manufacturing my design in aircraft spruce with me doing the least amount of work as possible. I'm supposed to be retired!!!

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    558

    Default Re: Muri-Maru, a 17' 5" birdwing Yangtze Pelican microcruiser

    I must be getting getting old: I just realise I test sailed Olivier Vermeers boat, Volante, myself 20 years ago for a magazine. She sailed quite well.
    Later Time and Tide was in the Great Glen Raid and Kathy Mansfield wrote about her. I think the first wooden masts failed after a while and are carbon now.

  4. #109
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    St. Augustine, FL
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    3,488

    Default Re: Muri-Maru, a 17' 5" birdwing Yangtze Pelican microcruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by FF View Post
    I must be getting getting old: I just realise I test sailed Olivier Vermeers boat, Volante, myself 20 years ago for a magazine. She sailed quite well.
    Later Time and Tide was in the Great Glen Raid and Kathy Mansfield wrote about her. I think the first wooden masts failed after a while and are carbon now.
    Thanks for the information. Yep, Iain had told me about their laminated fir masts having some failures. All my masts have been mostly laminated aircraft spruce and I've had no failures even in the thirty knot winds of my big day in the Texas 200. Some of my early masts have been terribly overbuilt but my latest mast for my dory is quite light for a wooden mast. I've thought about going to carbon fiber but the laminated spruce is pretty, fatigue-resistant, and cheaper plus I can machine in the taper of the mast to keep it light. I would like to see my design done in carbon fiber but it probably will not be me that goes that route. There are so many people on the planet that could do a much better job of a carbon fiber birdwing mast than me. And yes, carbon fiber is where the best performance will be but I'm just weird and like wood. If I were younger and concerned about making money, carbon fiber would definitely the way to go. At my age, I have no desire to start a company. I mostly want to go fishing, ride my bicycle, and build boats for fun.
    Last edited by kenjamin; 09-13-2018 at 08:35 AM.

  5. #110
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    3,488

    Default Re: Muri-Maru, a 17' 5" birdwing Yangtze Pelican microcruiser

    It seems I can post images that I have posted before by cutting and pasting code but have lost the ability to even open Fat Cow, my service provider (that is fixin' to get fired)!

    Here's that Iain Oughtred letter I've been trying to post from 2006.



    Iain states that the Dutch boat used "complex and expensive" hardware so I never worried about intruding on their design because my design is a one-piece design that does not use expensive or complex hardware. My birdwing mast simply rotates in a conventional mast step with balanced rotation due to its sickle shape. They were both curved mast designs but very different in the way they rotated. In any case, it was Florida State University that pursued and was awarded the patent, not me.

    Last edited by kenjamin; 09-13-2018 at 08:34 AM.

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