Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 48 of 48

Thread: double ended boat decision

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    23,413

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    I wonder if Redmond's Whisp without sailing rig might be a place to start.
    I rowed the one in WB's fleet one afternoon and would REALLY hesitate to take it out in steep waves and high winds like to OP wants to.
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,386

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    I rowed the one in WB's fleet one afternoon and would REALLY hesitate to take it out in steep waves and high winds like to OP wants to.
    Yes but the real nasty thing that the OP wants to do is board routinely with dive gear on and he wants it all to weigh less than 100 pounds or so. I think any thing like the bolger light dory would be hard to board over the stern.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,386

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Any feedback you want to offer on post 21? Good/bad/indifferent?
    So far post 21 looks like the way to go; it would be easier to board with more buoyant dinghy stern.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    23,413

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Yes but the real nasty thing that the OP wants to do is board routinely with dive gear on and he wants it all to weigh less than 100 pounds or so. I think any thing like the bolger light dory would be hard to board over the stern.

    Did he say dive gear? I thought he was just a snorkeler. But anyway....
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Did he say dive gear? I thought he was just a snorkeler. But anyway....

    correct, though it is now acceptable to call oneself a Freediver to differentiate oneself from a mere snorkeler, provided a few breathholds and some judicious finning down towards the bottom are performed from time to time while swimming.

    Surely i would never be so 'nasty' as to subject a light dingy to scuba tanks.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    2,020

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Yes but the real nasty thing that the OP wants to do is board routinely with dive gear on and he wants it all to weigh less than 100 pounds or so. I think any thing like the bolger light dory would be hard to board over the stern.
    --- Sounds like he needs a small-medium size outrigger canoe, excellent for reboarding, and adaptable to sail, power, or paddle. -- Wade

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Any feedback you want to offer on post 21? Good/bad/indifferent?
    This is the Thames skiff from that page right? The DNA of the Whitehall it could be said, yes i like it very much.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,778

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    8M to windward in 25 kts wind and sea??
    This is not reasonably do-able.
    As a rowing tender for a larger yacht, I agree a somewhat longer boat has many advantages. For single handed work 15' I think is the maximum. I'd probably be thinking of 12'-14' ...as the boat gets longer you need more force to keep pointing in the direction you want to go. In rough water I would not go to big. I had a 13.5' boat that was a good load carrier and handy in a rough sea. She tracked well and turned easily.
    I'd probably strongly consider a pram ( double ended?).
    Windage is a really serious problem in very low powered boats....rowing boats...
    What about the mcginess bateau? A friend has one and I like it though I have not had it out in a wind/sea.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    860

    Default Re: double ended boat decision


  10. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    860

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Or maybe this to save outrigger costs. The Gartside Coastal Rowing boat. Cedar strip. Good adjustable thwart system for one or two rowing. Sails downwind.


  11. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Any feedback you want to offer on post 21? Good/bad/indifferent?
    There are just too many nice boats on your site..i've got work to do!

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Barcelona
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    So, mostly for convenience, I built a CLC Skerry in the end. Aside from the endless sanding and coating, the build was a fairly painless process.

    But as a sea rowing skiff she is really too light. Also, she has quite pronounced rocker and a dory bottom so that as she crests a wave, much of her wetted surface forward is out of the water providing an invtation for any gust of wind to throw her well of course.

    Adding some form of ballast/trim adjustment as advised above will help this problem i'm sure, as will rowing the daggerboard lowered - when i get around to building it.

    But it got me thinking If working dories behaved better with a load or fish or gear as mentioned above then that is presumably beacuse they then had more boat in the water. So why don't dory bottom craft, especially lightweight modern versions, have external keels? Even the builders of the Gig Harbour Swamscott write that their Whitehhall is easier to keep on course due to having better grip on the water. Would a Skerry or similar dory bottom boat fitted with a low aspect keel, really just and extension of the skeg say a couple of inches deep at midpoint continued to the bow, start to behave more like a sophisticated multi planked or round bilge boat with a proper keel?

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,232

    Default Re: double ended boat decision

    Some of the Danish fishing beach prams had removable bow-fins to help with tracking while under sail or course stability in wind. Certainly a bit of wood under the water does not turn it into another form of boat, but does help those that are built with a shallow body.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •