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Thread: Pine tar: acceptable brands

  1. #1
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    Default Pine tar: acceptable brands

    My local marine hardware store has stopped carrying pine tar.
    Amazon carries two types,
    - Tenda Pine Tar, and
    - Bickmore Pine Tar.
    Is anyone familiar with these brands?
    Last edited by portsample; 07-07-2017 at 02:33 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Here's where I bought my last pint -- http://www.tarsmell.com/tar.html

    Don't know anything about Tenda... but have used the Bickmore, and didn't appreciate the aroma.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Or, if you don't have the left-overs to mix your own boat soup, better than just pine tar is


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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Our real enemy is the
    MIC
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Quote Originally Posted by chohm View Post
    Excellent. Lots of good info and even a couple Viking boat pics!
    Our real enemy is the
    MIC
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Quote Originally Posted by chohm View Post
    Do they sell actual pine tar now? Used to be only pine tar based products like stains and paints.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    I'm Going to claim ignorance on PT.

    Do I need to use it?

    I could look the use and application information. up but then there wouldn't be a discussion on it.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    I'm not wild about pine tar by itself, nor about linseed oil by itself, though for some applications each has its advocates. I like boat slush like Kirby's Salty Dog. traditional boat shops have left-over old 1/4 cans or less of all sorts of stuff from many jobs, especially solvents than may have a bit of paint from cleaning brushes and mostly gone varnish cans. Mix them up and you have boat soup, often in mixes that change at random.

    But today most pros have better planning and better storage methods so you just don't have left-overs in any kind of useful quantity. You can still make your own boat soup but the actual cost, especially if you factor in beyond ingredient purchase costs the administrative and labor costs of handling and mixing, comes out to be so close to buying a product like Kirby's that if that will do you, go that way.

    That said, on Meg Kirby's Salty Dog was used to slush boat parts during construction to prevent shrinking and cracking as frames and planks were added. And I've decided to use just Salty Dog on the inside hull of the fo'c's'le and the 'afterberth', no paint. It has a camphor smell that settles down to pleasantly fresh a week after application.

    Linseed oil or Salty Dog are nice also for exposed bare wood where the use is too rough for varnish. Linseed oil tends to become black with time, often just the desired effect. Either will want renewal at least midway through the season and boats kept in year round should get a good slushing last warm day of fall. Cap rails, bullworks, and laid wood decks are all subject to slushing.

    Pine tar, linseed oil, old varnish, and such in any random mix or Salty Dog can also be just the thing for slushing fully served wire. You might do this on a bob stay, though keeping air away from stainless is never good, and you surely would do this on any galvanized rigging. More decorative seizings, services, and whippings that you might do on a steering wheel rim or the end of a tiller are very well served by periodic slushing to control staining and prevent chafe and loosening.

    G'luck

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    From 2010:
    *********************
    San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park
    http://www.maritime.org/conf/conf-kaye-tar.htm
    Pine Tar; History And Uses,
    Theodore P. Kaye
    .................
    For at least the past decade, we have been purchasing pine tar from Natrochem in Savannah, Georgia. Natrochem's supplier is Auson Chemical Industry, Gsteborg, Sweden. We learned from Auson that they make many grades of pine tar for many different uses, but the product exported to the U.S. is EU-588 15 (Natrotar 588), and is a "so-called old fashioned type of tar", and is a byproduct of soft wood charcoal production.

    *********************

    I have purchased P-tar from NaturoChem a couple times since 2010.
    One problem is that they do not accept credit cards. Instead they send the tar and you have to mail a check after you get it.
    A check? Who has a check these days ?

    http://natrochem.com/tds/Natro-Tar%20588.tds.pdf
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Also called Stockholm tar, as in Europe that's where most of it came from.

    You can usually find pine tar at your local animal farm feed store, as its used to treat and maintain the good condition of horses hooves. It comes in liquid, semi liquid, and stick form.

    Some sporting goods stores carry it for treating wooden baseball bat handles. This isn't always pure though. Look for the George Brett brand which is pure.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    For the adventurous or those who cut a lot of wood anyway...fell a pine tree, block it up, split off the sap wood, cut out the large roots from the root ball. Then burry a metal bucket, put another bucket on top with a hole in the bottom, fill top bucket with resinous pine and then start a fire around said bucket. Open beer and enjoy fire. Top bucket will turn to charcoal and the bottom bucket will have tar.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    In most cases the old-school Stockholm pine tar is very different from the product for use on horses and baseball bats, so I'd stick (ar ar ar) to the traditional nautical product if possible. A little bit goes a LONG way...
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Pure pine tar is pure pine whether sold for horses hooves or for using on rope or in boat soup. The typical additive to pine tar for bats is rosin, which is really just undistilled pine tar. Its what allows the pine tar to be packaged as a bar or stick instead of as a liquid or jelly.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Not that it matters but rosin is the sap with the turpentine removed eh? The tar being "slow fired" sap. Would that be carbonized sap chemists?

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    In most cases the old-school Stockholm pine tar is very different from the product for use on horses and baseball bats, so I'd stick (ar ar ar) to the traditional nautical product if possible. A little bit goes a LONG way...
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    Pure pine tar is pure pine whether sold for horses hooves or for using on rope or in boat soup. The typical additive to pine tar for bats is rosin, which is really just undistilled pine tar. Its what allows the pine tar to be packaged as a bar or stick instead of as a liquid or jelly.
    It is also sometimes diluted with solvents. And there are various grades. And - since part of the attraction of working with pine tar is the old-timey aroma (at least for me) - I'm fussy about the brand/type I buy. The ones I've found at the farm & garden stores, intended for use with livestock, just don't smell the same. I'm no pine-tar expert, so I can't explain precisely why... but it is so in my limited experience.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Has anyone tried treating hemp or cotton rope with tar?

    And Ian: what is the process of Slushing? Do you rub it in with a rag? That's how I oil my boat.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    I use a paint brush. Even for fully served stays that are in place. For that job, as with varnishing or painting a mast in place, I work from the bo's'n's chair, legs tight around the stay or mast and some heavy old canvass as a lap born drip cloth.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Quote Originally Posted by photocurio View Post
    Has anyone tried treating hemp or cotton rope with tar?

    And Ian: what is the process of Slushing? Do you rub it in with a rag? That's how I oil my boat.
    Even though the idea of slushing down rigging with pine tar sounds "Yar" it is messy and on a hot day it has the potential of perminatly staining any thing that touches it; sails, clothing and hands! A better choice is Liqutex black, water based, artist's acrylic paint. It will last and last and last and never lose its color.
    In fact, I served the life lines and martingale net on "Red Witch"with marlin in 1990 and painted them with black acrylic. They are more comfortable in the hand than the plastic coating that is the under cover on the SS lifelines. They look better too! When they need re-painting, I will add a new coat. I use it on the spreader seizings for "Bright Star" as well. No dirty sails!
    Jay


  20. #20
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    The very best pine tar is made the tradtional way in a tar pit.
    There is a batch being made by volunteers in Övermark at the moment http://www.tjardalen.fi/ but generally production ceased 70 years ago.

    Modern pine tar is burned in a steel tank but it isn't quite as good. However there are huge variations in quality between different makes.
    "Skogens trätjära" has proven to be among the best substitutes for the proper thing but the maker Skogens Kol went bankrupt in 2014 so I don't know what to buy tar next time. I don't know if the pine tar now made by somebody else under the same name name is equally good.
    Some diluted sorts of cheap "pine tar" washes off at the first rain shower and provides no protection whatsoever to the wood.

    Personally I would not use anything else than various mixtures of pine tar and linseed oil and turpentine on a wooden boat except on the outside below water.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Pine tar: acceptable brands

    Another source. I think you can call for a larger container. I've seen 5 gallons.
    http://shop.skinboats.com/Coreys-Bio-Blends_c22.htm
    Quote Originally Posted by Hreoaj View Post
    Not that it matters but rosin is the sap with the turpentine removed eh? The tar being "slow fired" sap. Would that be carbonized sap chemists?
    No. Carbonized is more or less burnt. But yes, there is a continuinuumnummn from sap to turpentine, pine tar and rosin. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosin
    Carbonization (or carbonisation) is the term for the conversion of an organic substance into carbon or a carbon-containing residue through pyrolysis or destructive distillation. It is often used in organic chemistry with reference to the generation of coal gas and coal tar from raw coal.
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