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Thread: Adventure Motorbike

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I rode a lot in my younger years and any bike will go off road until you get to fording rivers and knee deep mud.
    Generally if it is a walking/ hiking trail just about any bike will do it! Get the one you like...
    Picking up 500# of bike and gear on the other hand ...

    Rob, if you go on your scoot, and I totally encourage you to do so, I guarantee you'll have more fun on it than you will on any KTM or Beemer, go ahead and strap on a gallon of gas between your feet. A good gallon jerry can won't split in two if dropped, won't spark and blow up etc. and if its tied down well will never leave the safety of the foot rest.

    I rode a Ruckus for a couple years and added a luggage rack on the rear from Cycleracks. I also added a couple flipup/down footpegs to the frame. This allowed me to stand up when going through rough stuff my legs either side of the bike, underneath me instead of infront of me.

    The luggage rack and the footpegs also doubled as a place for a pillion to sit and put her feet

    But I carried a lot of stuff on that scoot, up and down some crazy hills.

    Go with your scoot Rob! Its yours, its there, its a much more interesting story than anything generated with the same itinerary on a Beemer or Katoom.


    eta: this is what my scoot looked like, except red , and with footpegs where you see the holes in the frame under the seat.
    Last edited by B_B; 07-04-2017 at 10:02 PM.
    "I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible that you may be mistaken." (stolen from TomF )

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike


  3. #38
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by B_B View Post
    Picking up 500# of bike and gear on the other hand ...

    Rob, if you go on your scoot, and I totally encourage you to do so, I guarantee you'll have more fun on it than you will on any KTM or Beemer, go ahead and strap on a gallon of gas between your feet. A good gallon jerry can won't split in two if dropped, won't spark and blow up etc. and if its tied down well will never leave the safety of the foot rest.

    I rode a Ruckus for a couple years and added a luggage rack on the rear from Cycleracks. I also added a couple flipup/down footpegs to the frame. This allowed me to stand up when going through rough stuff my legs either side of the bike, underneath me instead of infront of me.

    The luggage rack and the footpegs also doubled as a place for a pillion to sit and put her feet

    But I carried a lot of stuff on that scoot, up and down some crazy hills.

    Go with your scoot Rob! Its yours, its there, its a much more interesting story than anything generated with the same itinerary on a Beemer or Katoom.


    eta: this is what my scoot looked like, except red , and with footpegs where you see the holes in the frame under the seat.
    Oh, I be scooting. But, if I want to get across country and back again in one summer, I'm going to need to do highways comfortably.
    And, there are other, further away, sometimes cold places I might could get to and back on a bike, camping.
    Just dreaming and scheming.

    Peace,
    Robert

    P.S. After the next service, in 200 miles, and a new belt, I'm going for an overnight scooter trip. Why not?

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Ooh.

    Still. There is a lady I need to get an outboard for before I bring home another engine. Plus TONS of other things money is flooding out to salve right now.
    The house recently sucked up a few brand new beemers.

    Peace,
    Robert

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    I finally sold my 1999 Kawa Concours when it became too much of an adventure to ride in Seattle traffic.
    “What, Me Worry?". -. A. E. Newman

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    So, I've been looking at those KLRs. That seems a fantastic deal in a motorcycle. Used models cheap, there are a bunch, and, shoot, even the brand new ones aren't much.
    Just farting around trying to Internet I found some numbers, and the new ones are around 5 grand. That's crazy. A thousand bucks will get a decent used one all day.
    An older bike would be nice, but I'd rather have something parts are easily and readily available for. The working on it don't scare me, but having currently stocked parts is a real plus.

    Crazy. I really had no idea about any of these bikes and I thank you all. Please add more to the list, if you see or know,of them.

    I am a very irrational, but goal oriented person. You know I'm a multi time ironman? Much planning and foresight and work behind the scenes go into those.

    So, as my projects progress, and my exchequer expands, I will continue to work toward this new ambition, and hopefully I'll be able to take a long trip. It would be cool to have my ducks in a row enough to ride a bit with Ian.

    Still. I got a lot of house and boat projects, first.

    Peace,
    Robert

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    So, I've been looking at those KLRs. That seems a fantastic deal in a motorcycle. Used models cheap, there are a bunch, and, shoot, even the brand new ones aren't much.
    Just farting around trying to Internet I found some numbers, and the new ones are around 5 grand. That's crazy. A thousand bucks will get a decent used one all day.
    An older bike would be nice, but I'd rather have something parts are easily and readily available for. The working on it don't scare me, but having currently stocked parts is a real plus.

    Crazy. I really had no idea about any of these bikes and I thank you all. Please add more to the list, if you see or know,of them.

    I am a very irrational, but goal oriented person. You know I'm a multi time ironman? Much planning and foresight and work behind the scenes go into those.

    So, as my projects progress, and my exchequer expands, I will continue to work toward this new ambition, and hopefully I'll be able to take a long trip. It would be cool to have my ducks in a row enough to ride a bit with Ian.

    Still. I got a lot of house and boat projects, first.

    Peace,
    Robert
    The video that BrianW posted in #24 is worth a few minutes. It's not a perfect bike, but for 90% of the would be adventure riders out there, it's the right bike.
    Nosce te ipsum

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    And if a Ducati can do it, so can a Kawasaki.
    Nosce te ipsum

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dryfoot View Post
    The video that BrianW posted in #24 is worth a few minutes. It's not a perfect bike, but for 90% of the would be adventure riders out there, it's the right bike.
    Oh, I watched the video, which is why I gave a second and third look to the bike. I'd maybe rather something with a little more street bias, even, but that's just being a jerk.
    I am after a tool to do a job, and if there's a les expensive version, its for me.

    It's really all about this. I don't fly. Not a discussion. I also simply can't pedal myself around the country again. I'm physically incapable of that much pedaling, even in a recumbent position. By that much I mean 70-100 miles a day, by the by. 4-5 days a week. Can't do it.

    But, there are a lot of reasons to take one more lap of the country in the air as much as possible. My whole life has been about making the impossible happen (sometimes actually), so we shall see.

    For now, I am keeping it at a pleasant thread topic, which may very well parlay into my having a practical tool for transport and travel.
    Which, maybe some of y'all don't want I should have that kind of mobility, eh?
    "Honey, The BFG is doing graffiti on our front porch with a sharpie marker. It looks like piranhas."

    Peace,
    Robert

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    "Hang on, yo, I just need to adjust my valves.

    Peace,
    Roberto

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    A key element to an adventure bike is getting that extra range. All the kids use the MSR bottles which can double up for cooking or boiling water if need be.

    There is nothing you can do with an ape/human hybrid. They'll rip your arm off.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    A key element to an adventure bike is getting that extra range. All the kids use the MSR bottles which can double up for cooking or boiling water if need be.

    You do what and what, now? How do I put gas in a fire extinguisher? C'mon, dude, you know I'm dumb as a rock. Use really small words.

    What is that? MSR leads me to believe a mountaineering type device? Fuel bottle? Where do those trees grow?

    Peace,
    Robert

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    You do what and what, now? How do I put gas in a fire extinguisher? C'mon, dude, you know I'm dumb as a rock. Use really small words.

    What is that? MSR leads me to believe a mountaineering type device? Fuel bottle? Where do those trees grow?

    Peace,
    Robert
    I see your dream Robert. The key to our success is in the dream state execution.

    There is nothing you can do with an ape/human hybrid. They'll rip your arm off.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    I see the attraction but recognize it will take you on a different adventure.

    There is nothing you can do with an ape/human hybrid. They'll rip your arm off.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    If mobility issues need solving...


    I've been riding for a 33 years now (holy...where did the time go?) but only started in with the dual sport thing about 10 years ago, my opinions are those of a guy who has to come back from his ride in one piece to go the work the next day.

    For cruising around on fire/timber roads, fording the occasional stream and tackling the increasingly potholed and rutted streets of America today the KLR/F650 type are hard to beat. Now if what you want is to fly off berms and roost dirt into the air, a lighter more dirt oriented ride is probably in order. Not that a talented rider can't do that on a big BMW 1200GS, but it takes a lot of time to get to that point. When I hear riders bad mouthing the bigger adventure bikes I always like to find out where they are coming from, which is usually the tear-it-up-fly-through-the-air-camp which is fine but isn't what these bikes are all about no matter what the advertising would have you believe. For someone like me who needs a dependable in-city commuter and has a good hour of tarmac to the nearest Forest Service road the KLR would be hard to beat if I were getting a do-over. As it happens I fell for the black and white checkered Dakar after watching a Helge Pedersen video tour of Iceland, had to have it.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Hoppe View Post
    I see your dream Robert. The key to our success is in the dream state execution.

    Boom! The final piece to the immediate puzzle. A few of those, and I could get pretty far away (and back!) on el scooterino.
    Excellent!

    Peace,
    Robert

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Boom!
    well hopefully not
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    If mobility issues need solving...


    I've been riding for a 33 years now (holy...where did the time go?) but only started in with the dual sport thing about 10 years ago, my opinions are those of a guy who has to come back from his ride in one piece to go the work the next day.

    For cruising around on fire/timber roads, fording the occasional stream and tackling the increasingly potholed and rutted streets of America today the KLR/F650 type are hard to beat. Now if what you want is to fly off berms and roost dirt into the air, a lighter more dirt oriented ride is probably in order. Not that a talented rider can't do that on a big BMW 1200GS, but it takes a lot of time to get to that point. When I hear riders bad mouthing the bigger adventure bikes I always like to find out where they are coming from, which is usually the tear-it-up-fly-through-the-air-camp which is fine but isn't what these bikes are all about no matter what the advertising would have you believe. For someone like me who needs a dependable in-city commuter and has a good hour of tarmac to the nearest Forest Service road the KLR would be hard to beat if I were getting a do-over. As it happens I fell for the black and white checkered Dakar after watching a Helge Pedersen video tour of Iceland, had to have it.
    This is great. My berm roosting, nacnac days are well behind me. I'm really just looking to meander on smaller roads, especially around here. There are loads of mountain roads that leads to webs of fire road that lead to woterfalls and big trees and...

    Now, el scooterino is capable of 80% of this type foolishness, but I worry about stretches of 200+ miles on el scooterino. This theoretical motorbike will be purely for the pleasure of adventuring, and need not be a daily commuter. I still do most of my moving with my feet or bicycle.

    Peace,
    Robert

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    well hopefully not
    Haha. Words matter. Hahaha.

    Peace,
    Robert

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Range wasn't a problem in Vietnam... fuel was available everywhere - although I did run out once. Not here... this was just a particularly nasty area with deep mud... we got past it by taking to the side of the road. I was somewhat over-loaded here. I carry a lot less when I travel these days. The cushion was an attempt to get some ergo improvements - I was having a real problem with it for a while



    Especially when the chick magnet qualities of my scooter came to the fore and it was even more crowded than usual. The lady on the back took us home to her place for a couple of days



    Yeah... the scoot will get you there... but I so much prefer my KTMs

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Incidentally, the guy I bought my smaller KTM from is in hospital in Thailand again... awaiting a tendon reattachment and pin. Thumb / wrist injury... again. He hit a fallen tree that was at 45 degrees to the angle of travel, went to wheelie over it without slowing... ended up sideways into a standing tree. Oops.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    none of your pics are showing
    you might try smugmug
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    none of your pics are showing
    you might try smugmug
    They show for me. Are you getting the nasty photobucket message?
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    no, i just get the old busted link icon
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    working for me
    "I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible that you may be mistaken." (stolen from TomF )

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Working for me too.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Along with the MSR idea, there is also the Rotopax system. It costs more, but it's a full gallon.

    Nosce te ipsum

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    A good idea .

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    1) A bike where parts and service are readily and economically available in the areas you will be traveling, or you can pack or have a support vehicle transport needed items.
    2) See number (1)
    3) Not the first year on the market for the powerplant or frame unless the manufacturer has a stellar reputation for durability testing prior to series production.
    4) Something that blends in and won't attract undue attention, most especially in areas more prone to crime, both low level and organized.
    5) Off-road mobility and highway capabilities in proportion to your trip itinerary.

    Ewan MacGregor and Charlie Boorman used BMW GS 1200s to go around the world. They originally wanted to take KTM dirt bikes, but the manufacturer was worried if they would hold up. Not a good sign. BMW said of the GS, "That's what it was designed for." They thought the bikes would be too heavy, but were well able to handle the burden of heavy loading and severe use, though they did bog down in the mud of Siberia. They changed tires after crossing into Alaska where the rest of the trip would be highway. These days, there are several 2 wheel drive motorcycles available that have astounding off-road mobility. A friend of mine does exploratory trips on the GS 650, and it's a much narrower bike, but I hate that 4 stroke parallel twins have such terrible secondary balance that they require an opposing weighted rocking lever.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    I'm a sucker for single sided swing arms. But not desmo valve adjustments.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    1) A bike where parts and service are readily and economically available in the areas you will be traveling, or you can pack or have a support vehicle transport needed items.
    2) See number (1)
    3) Not the first year on the market for the powerplant or frame unless the manufacturer has a stellar reputation for durability testing prior to series production.
    4) Something that blends in and won't attract undue attention, most especially in areas more prone to crime, both low level and organized.
    5) Off-road mobility and highway capabilities in proportion to your trip itinerary.

    Ewan MacGregor and Charlie Boorman used BMW GS 1200s to go around the world. They originally wanted to take KTM dirt bikes, but the manufacturer was worried if they would hold up. Not a good sign. BMW said of the GS, "That's what it was designed for." They thought the bikes would be too heavy, but were well able to handle the burden of heavy loading and severe use, though they did bog down in the mud of Siberia. They changed tires after crossing into Alaska where the rest of the trip would be highway. These days, there are several 2 wheel drive motorcycles available that have astounding off-road mobility. A friend of mine does exploratory trips on the GS 650, and it's a much narrower bike, but I hate that 4 stroke parallel twins have such terrible secondary balance that they require an opposing weighted rocking lever.
    McGregor / Boorman had extensive support... IIRC two or three 4 x 4s with them - including their own doctor. Every time I see a photo of their bikes, I wonder just how much is in those panniers? Most of their trip was done on the bitumen... in Long Way Down I seem to recall that only 10% of the trip was on dirt roads. For the original Long Way Round, KTM was more concerned that the team would fail... not the bikes. As it was, two of the three BMWs on that trip broke their frames... and one had to be flown out (back to BMW) after they fried the ABS during the welding repair. Makes the heart bleed, eh? Their trip reports seem overly censored in favour of their sponsors for my liking.

    Many, many bikes have been around the world before their trips... the first in 1912 was Carl Stearns Clancy, on a Henderson Four. A friend of mine wrote a book about his trip and was re-enacting it when I saw him a few years back (he'd already ridden around the world seven times himself).

    As for spares availability, etc... no adventure bike has widespread spares availability "out there".... unless it's a Honda 110cc scooter. It isn't a problem. People doing this aren't in a race. I had to wait for parts once - and they were basic parts (wheel bearings that I should have been carrying - but had left before they arrived) So - I cooled my heels in a nice little town for 3 days until the bearings arrived by bus. I pre-planned some needed spares deliveries... even had my daughter fly to Bali with brake disks and tyres for one delivery. It isn't hard to do these days.

    As for blending in. Nah... it ain't happening. You don't blend in.... your bike is necessarily different to every local's bike when you are in remote areas.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    I would say its not much of an adventure if you are within range of a BMW dealership. Since i picked up another Xl250S I will be playing with sprocket sizes to get a lower rpm at highway speeds, it might be engine pitch or wind whistle through the visor, but i have worse than usual tinnitus after an hours ride. I have yet to find comfortable ear plugs, and i do not like to be totally without hearing, lots of feedback comes through the ears when riding. Pulls well up to 70mph where the gearing kinda stops.
    How big are the wheels on your scoot? When people mention scooter, i always think Vespa/Lambretta, and those tiny wheels are lethal in the wet, though im sure that there are wicked sticky compound rubber tyres avaliable today.

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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by The Bigfella View Post
    McGregor / Boorman had extensive support... IIRC two or three 4 x 4s with them - including their own doctor. Every time I see a photo of their bikes, I wonder just how much is in those panniers? Most of their trip was done on the bitumen... in Long Way Down I seem to recall that only 10% of the trip was on dirt roads. For the original Long Way Round, KTM was more concerned that the team would fail... not the bikes. As it was, two of the three BMWs on that trip broke their frames... and one had to be flown out (back to BMW) after they fried the ABS during the welding repair. Makes the heart bleed, eh? Their trip reports seem overly censored in favour of their sponsors for my liking.
    I believe you, but where did you learn all of this?
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

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    Default Re: Adventure Motorbike

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    I believe you, but where did you learn all of this?
    http://advrider.com/index.php?thread...-round.738133/
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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