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Thread: Centennial

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    Nice. Looks cozy! Maybe get fire-resistant socks :-) The chimney dismounts, I assume? -- Wade
    you assume correctly, a pin in the stack under the deck allow the stack through the deck to be removed and a water tight cap put in place.... but the hole in the deck can also double as an exit for a bilge pump operated from below or on deck... if necessary, not a good situation but an essential option for emergency type situations where the deck hatches must remain closed and water must be pumped from below decks.


  2. #37
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    you assume correctly, a pin in the stack under the deck allow the stack through the deck to be removed and a water tight cap put in place.... but the hole in the deck can also double as an exit for a bilge pump operated from below or on deck... if necessary, not a good situation but an essential option for emergency type situations where the deck hatches must remain closed and water must be pumped from below decks.

    --- Nice idea! -- Wade

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    --- Nice idea! -- Wade
    ... Alfred Johnson's! he had a bilge pump built into the deck, seemed like a nice touch viewing it in the museaum, but after sailing on the open ocean and contemplating raising the hatch and trying to bail while keeping the hatch from sliding overboard this set up makes a ton of sense... so many design details are understood fully only in the operation of the craft.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Centennial

    found a few more photos on my phone today that I did no upload while on the water this past September...

    Halibut Point.


    another shot of the Rockpile.


    couple ok images of the Replica Columbia.

  5. #40
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    Jul 2000
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    N.E. Connecticut.
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Very pretty!

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    Very pretty!
    thanks ned!

    back on the water again! planning a voyage this evening over Turkey sandwiches, the plan is to go on a adventure tomorrow with the flooding tide, looking for ancient Indian middens on Plumbisland, accessible today only from the water, as the Wild Life Refuge restricts all public access to 99% of the islands interior.

    sunset on the Quascunqun.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Centennial


  8. #43
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    Apr 2017
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    Decatur, Georgia, USA
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    Default Re: Centennial

    ^^^ +++

  9. #44
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    Jul 2014
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    Willard, Utah
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    Default Re: Centennial

    What sort of navigation gear and optics do you carry on this historical recreation?

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Rat View Post
    What sort of navigation gear and optics do you carry on this historical recreation?
    sort of a work in progress... and it depends on where I plan on sailing.

    the "navigation" is very forgiving, particularly during day light hours, any thing this boat has a chance of hitting is typically very visiable, it is simple following channels and any sand bar or rock that I can not see or see turbulence from is likely too deep to hit.

    When we went to SRR in Blue Hill we had the required gear, including a Marine Radio, map of coastal Me, compass. We also had a GPS never turned ot on or used the compass or looked at the map other than at the morning briefings when we find out where we are sailing.

    Same gear for the trip to Gloucester.

    I also have a flash light, flares, horn, foul weather gear, a sweat shirt, sleeping bag, etc. all the basics. I have sailed with water ballast so far so I usually have 20-40 gallons of drinking water in gallon jugs along, and I have a few cans of random food and a can opener just in case I need to spend the night on the boat unexpectedly... this is a enginless sail and oar boat.

    an EPIRB is on the wish list, as are a couple of Survival Suits, which I have sent out a few emails about to Craigs List sellers, no luck yet. I would also like a sextant.

    the Centennial design has proven dry under the very benign conditions in which I have sailed her. the roughest water I have had her out in was likely the trip to Gloucester with 1-2' chop, nothing close to coming over the rail even on the low side.

    here's a shot of the typical sea state on the way to Gloucester.

    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 12-01-2017 at 09:04 PM.

  11. #46
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    Jul 2014
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    Willard, Utah
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    Default Re: Centennial

    A wide mix of rope... nylon, manila, stainless wire... any philosophy on which for which task? Why stainless wire instead of dacron, and so on?

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Rat View Post
    A wide mix of rope... nylon, manila, stainless wire... any philosophy on which for which task? Why stainless wire instead of dacron, and so on?
    yeahhh
    so I started with hardware store Manila for most of the running rigging. and on the way to Maine for the SRR we drove through a rain storm, the lines all got wet... which they were bound to do sooner or later, and the 1/4 inch manilla line expanded to 3/8th's -1/2 inch and refused to run trough the pulleys I had on the deck and mast... so I had plenty of spare line and swapped that out for the weekend... and havnt got around to changing it since.

    I'd like to get some real 1/4 inch manila that will still run through my blocks once it relaxes, right now i've got a heavy weight sash cord which works and feels great but looks a little... low class...? I may just end up getting some synthetics from NE Rope Co we'll see.

    I am planning on getting a length of the Amsteel stuff I think it's a Dyneema for the fore stay line. and had considered it for the rigging but I was interested in keeping pretty close to the look of a 1870's working dory, hence the wire rigging, galvanized hardware, blocks and cleats and the Manilla line.

    the Manila main sheet has worked fine it's a joy to handle and is actually the same main sheet I had on the schooner dory 14 years ago.

  13. #48
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    Jun 2004
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Just stopping by to say thank you for posting this wonderful thread Daniel
    Yachting, the only sport where you get to be a mechanic, electrician, plumber and carpenter

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Thanks, hoping to get another sail in before putting her up for the winter!


    guess I could say a little about her sailing characteristics and handling. Her rudder is pretty shallow but has excellent bit when sailing, significant bend to my oak tiller handle. The boat is about perfectly ballanced, weather helm but not hard to hold the tiller, with the jib up she has a very light touch on the tiller and will likely be able to self steer, though I have yet to test this out. The boat comes about reliably and makes little leeway with her centerboard and her hull/chine working to carry her to windward, I have left the board down running as it is weighted and contributes to stability. She rows easily in benign conditions but is an issue against a strong wind or tide.

    the boat is fairly high sided and narrow on the water, bottom is 38" so she is fairly tippy at rest, like all banks dories. once you have the sails full and she is heeled over the rail is about the sheer plank from the water where she stiffens up and I have yet to put the rail under.
    the narrow waterline means this boat is quicker than might be expected for a sleep aboard short ship. Johnson recorded multiple days run over 100 miles and I imagine a run of 120-150 would be quite possible with ideal conditions.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Centennial

    another stove trial
    Brrrr 26 degrees...



    but a tolerable 56+- below decks, thanks to some crackling popping Anthricite!



    yum, crackers and 3 kinds o' cheese!
    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 12-11-2017 at 09:43 PM.

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