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Thread: “Recently” Read

  1. #1
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    Default “Recently” Read

    Some time back we had a thread about books. I’ll offer my thoughts on a few that I’ve read recently or otherwise and I’d welcome your thoughts about the books you’ve read/are reading in the genre (including these, if you have something to add).

    Joel White, Boatbuilder/Designer/Sailor by Bill Mayher and Maynard Bray

    If you are a fan of the late Joel White’s reviews in WB, you’ll likely enjoy this book. It provides biographical insight into the man and his designs. His background informed his work (no surprise) and it’s great to see boats from his portfolio, many of which I don’t think were featured in the magazine. Thoroughly enjoyable.

    The Architect’s Apprentice by Gary M. Schwarzmann

    The subtitle, “The Story of the Design and Construction of a Wooden Sailboat” accurately describes the content, but the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. There is a lot in this book to appreciate. The author and his wife commissioned a design from Art Paine that was built by Damian McLaughlin. The copyright date is 1998 and the boat was built even earlier so the prices will prompt some nostalgia (for buyers).

    The book lays out the process from the perspective of the client and I think it also tries to present the builder’s and designer’s sides with some success. I think it’s greatest strength is laying out the process of project management and that’s worthwhile whether one has others do the work or does it themselves.

    Alfred Mylne The Leading Yacht Designer: Volume 1 1896-1920 and Great Yacht Designs by Alfred Mylne 1921 to 1945 by Ian Nicolson

    I must acknowledge that I’m a card-carrying fan of the first Mylne’s work. I like designs from the period in general and the work of Alfred the First in particular.

    I’m also a fan of Nicolson’s broader catalog of books, which have proved helpful references over the years and include handy solutions.

    The two books provide a nice sampling of Mylne’s work (47 courtesy of Google Books, the books are not at hand as I type this). There is likely a design for everyone in the sense that a person could find a design they could build for themselves. There’s the ~24’ Royal Mersey One Design, a very attractive knockabout, or Design No. 171, a 14-1/2’ motor dinghy. There are other designs, larger and smaller for both sail and power.

    If I have a complaint it is that too few designs are reviewed. Absent a work like those covering Alden or Rhodes by the late Richard Henderson (with Robert W. Carrick in the case of the book on Alden), that will likely always be the case. Similarly, I could do with more lines plan. But they are there for many of the designs.

    One nice thing about the Mylne designs is that copies of the plans may be purchased by “ordinary folks.” That was not the case with Fife’s work. A list of the designs can be found here- http://www.mylne.com/media/Design%20...02015-June.pdf

  2. #2
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    Default Re: “Recently” Read

    Good choices, as I reread Dalton's "Wayward Sailor" and Capt. Parrott's "Tall Ships Down", both of which have been discussed here before.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: “Recently” Read

    I've not read the Mylne books. Thanks!

    That other thread is called "What are you reading?", and it's still active -- http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...you+reading%3F
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: “Recently” Read

    Thanks for those, Ian.

    I was thinking about a much older thread, David. A quick search shows it was from '06 and can be found here - http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...Yachting-books. It was more narrowly focused than this and concentrated on "Classic British Yachting books."

    If you like Mylne's work, I think you'll enjoy the books. The format is small and they are paperbacks, both of which I neglected to mention above. It looks as if Nicolson has added a third book to the series - Great Yacht Designs by the Second Alfred Mylne 1945 to 1979. Nicolson also wrote a three part article in "Classic Boat" some years ago and some of Mylne's designs have popped up individually in that magazine on occasion.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: “Recently” Read

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiley Baggins View Post
    Nicolson also wrote a three part article in "Classic Boat" some years ago and some of Mylne's designs have popped up individually in that magazine on occasion.
    All three parts of that article can be found at the clyde1924 website.

    http://www.clyde1924.plus.com/clyde1...t1996_p58.html
    http://www.clyde1924.plus.com/clyde1...v1996_p50.html
    http://www.clyde1924.plus.com/clyde1...c1996_p46.html

    Also, here's an article in "Maine Boats & Harbors" by one of the authors of the book on Joel White, Bill Mayher. It's a bit of a preview to the book and enjoyable in its own right.

    https://maineboats.com/print/issue-147/joel-white

  6. #6
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    Default Re: “Recently” Read

    A Voyage in the Sunbeam [illustrated]

    by Annie Brassey, A.Y. Bingham (Illustrator)
    3.64 · Rating Details · 11 Ratings · 3 Reviews
    Contains hand-drawn illustrations from Hon. A. Y. Bingham.

    First published in 1878, A Voyage in the Sunbeam is a journal detailing the Brassey family’s voyage around the world. Annie Brassey delights in the mild Tahitian and Hawaiian breezes, shivers in the Japanese cold, and swelters in the Arabian heat. She struggles to keep down her breakfast sailing through the Straitsof Magellan, and boldly marches her children up to the caldera of an active Hawaiian volcano. She suffers many hardships, but Brassey is undaunted, retaining a childlike wonder in the sights she sees.>



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