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Thread: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

  1. #176
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks for your good wishes, jim! But neither the voyage, nor the thread is finished, with re-building Tonga I've still got 2 more years to go, if not more.

  2. #177
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Awesome, thanks Rumars! Whatever you like, as long as you keep Poseidon on my side !

  3. #178
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Thanks for your good wishes, jim! But neither the voyage, nor the thread is finished, with re-building Tonga I've still got 2 more years to go, if not more.
    i guess finish was the wrong word. i understand the older story and the present story are not finished. i meant catching up to the last current page and i am certainly not finished following you. two years? at the least, i hope you are warmer this winter and it sounds like the rebuilding is almost as much enjoyment to you as the sailing. you are so wise to not stress and just go at it a day at a time.

    jim

  4. #179
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    I see, misunderstood you, sorry! So nice to know you've been reading all of it, like it, and giving me some feedback, feels good, thanks!

    The thing with stress is that I just can't have it any more. If I want to get her back in the water and sail away I HAVE TO do it in my own speed - which feels admittedly quite slow at times. But as long as there is progress, even if it's only a tiny bit each day, chances are that I'll get there in the end. What often troubles me is the time I spend with research or figuring things out. Your brain is working overtime, which is a lot of fun also and very important in the whole process, but visually you can't see any progress on Tonga. Guess I'll have to sort something out with myself about it!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-12-2017 at 07:08 PM.

  5. #180
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    I thought it would be a good idea to get with this "chainplate-story" to where I'm making a semi-permanent one before I head off to Madeira in 2009 - before I get to the actual point of taking it out again in a few days time and still thinking about a good solution. And actually, it makes me happy and I really enjoy thinking of this voyage (and many more), so I'll just get on with the story if that's alright with you.

    April 2008, Gibraltar, Marina Bay Marina

    I had a long long sleep and a monster-breakfast. It was not my first time in Gib (as they call Gibraltar in this area), I was longing to get up to the top of "the rock" again, sit there peacefully, watch the ships going by, enjoy the coastline on the other side and check out how Ceuta (a Spanish enclave on the Moroccan side I visited the year before) actually looks like from up here. Also, there were some tunnels they had dug into the rock, a lot actually, I think in WWII, and for some reason I never managed to check them out. And then of course, there was this runway-thing that really excited me.

    Have you ever been to an Airport where they have to close the runway to let people and traffic cross it to get to the border of another country? I haven't, I just had to try it out!

    And then there was the weatherforecast and the tides also. One can get things pretty wrong going through the straights of Gibraltar, but I was not in a hurry, plenty of time to wait and conditions were not right at the moment. So, let's have some fun!

    To enjoy from being up at the rock the weather was not good enough, but wasn't bad enough to hide out in the tunnels, so it had to be the runway and La Linea. Strange name for a town (The Line), but that's what the place is called on the other side of the runway.

    The barrier opened and heaps of cars, horse-drawn carts and people on foot, some with huge parcels on their back, crossed the runway to arrive on the other side, it felt quite special!

    La Linea had quite some nice old buildings in the centre but none of them smallish, it must have been quite a while since it left village-status. I found some tiny little lovely corners, but the rest was feeling pretty faceless. Got me some typical Spanish stuff in the shops, things I knew I would miss later further North, and went back.

    Next day was perfect for the rock. I got up there, found a place that suited me perfectly, sitting there for hours in the sunshine, watching the busy traffic down on the water and the coastline on the other side. The tourist-season was still far away so I had it all for myself. What a great place to be at this moment!

    The right conditions were coming up and I still needed to do some shopping, so I skipped the tunnels - again!!!

    If we would manage to be at the entrance of the bay tomorrow exactly at 12 o'clock noon and keep half a mile offshore not to get into the countercurrents, we should have the current with us for 2 hours. And even better: around 12 o'clock a slight easterly wind was supposed to come up. Alright, it was forecast to quickly increase to a Force 8 when we would probably be at Tarifa, but it would be from behind, so no problem with our chainplate. And when turning in a northerly direction once past Tarifa our makeshift-chainplate would be on the lee-side, so nothing pulling on it. Yipppeee, let's go!!!!






    We arrived 10 Minutes early, I got the foresail up and could already see little cats-paws on the water heading towards us, whow, that looks good! Soon after I could feel the tide changing and we were on our way. Bright sunshine and the sea having that beautiful radiant dark blue, seagulls were playing in the wind, this is the life, I love it! Tonga was super-happy and me too, we were flying along - good-bye Mediterranean!!!








    More in a minute ...
    Last edited by Dody; 08-14-2017 at 03:06 PM.
    fair winds, Dody

    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain

  6. #181
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga



    It was a bit of a rough and bumpy but fast ride, the promise of the weatherforecast had come fairly true, but it was worth every single second. Once Tarifa at the other end of the straights of Gibraltar was abeam, we could feel the lively, long and comfortable breathing of the Atlantic Ocean. The nasty steep and short waves of the Med were far behind us, and that's where we want them to stay. Till today I'm still saying "the Mediterranean has spit us out" !

    Tarifa is quite a famous spot with people from all over the world doing windsurfing, the cracks chasing for the challenge. No wonder, this is the home of strong westerly winds, and a windpark couldn't be far away!



    A few hours later it was engine-time again if I didn't want to use the mainsail. With 1.500 rpm our Mercedes OM352 (5.7 L Diesel, 130 HP, 6-cylinder, originally used in Unimogs, Buses, Elevators ...) takes 3.5 L per hour and a speed of something between 5 and 6 knots. With a flat sea I can get her up to 9.5 knots easily, but she's a bit more thirsty then. Next fuelstop was gonna be Chipiona, a port at the entrance to the river Guadalquivir - that's the one you've got to sail up if you would like to visit Sevilla.


    Cabo Trafalgar (there was a big sea-battle ages ago) was the point where I could turn a bit more in a northerly direction. There is some shoals I kept well off, but the dolphins came anyway and if it was only to say hello and play with us.



    The sun went down and had this face I'm always feeling a bit uncomfortable with, but the night stayed perfectly calm. The lights of Cadiz started to show in the distance, came closer, but somehow it felt as if they wouldn't move at all. Yes, I know, the fixed lights on land are not meant to move :-D!

    It was still night when we arrived at the entrance to the Rio Guadalquivir. The tide had just changed and I was staring my eyes out for the channel markers which somehow I didn't manage to find. Never mind, it's less than 2 hours till daylight will come, so we drifted peacefully in the entrance.

    Hey, what's that? There was a fishing-boat following the very windy channel on his way to go into the port of Chipiona, and suddenly I could see all these markers, great, let's go!!!

    We got in and tied up at the fueldock, happy that we had arrived, when the Security-guy came over "no fuel, no space".

    We chatted away in Spanish (or better: the dialect of the people from Andalucia, because I've never learned Spanish or Castillano as it's properly called) and he explained to me that the guy running the fuelstation has his day off on Mondays in winter, that's why he can't give me any fuel. And of course, come with me, I've got 3 spaces for you, tell me which one you want and I'll give you a hand with the lines. On the way to the pontoons he excused himself "sorry for being so rude to you when you arrived, I thought you were a Giri". Giri is a not so very nice word for foreigner but used in everyday-language.

    He helped me with the lines, wished me a happy and peaceful sleep, and said he would talk with the people in the office to make sure they only charge me for one night while waiting for the fueldock to open on Tuesday. It was still dark when I headed for my bunk to catch up with some sleep.

    Nearly there!!!!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-13-2017 at 05:58 AM.
    fair winds, Dody

    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain

  7. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by MADOC1 View Post
    i guess finish was the wrong word. i understand the older story and the present story are not finished. i meant catching up to the last current page and i am certainly not finished following you. two years? at the least, i hope you are warmer this winter and it sounds like the rebuilding is almost as much enjoyment to you as the sailing. you are so wise to not stress and just go at it a day at a time.

    jim
    Aaaaahhh, jim, talking about the coming winter, you know what? Maybe 2 months ago I was at Ikea's in Lisboa and bought an extra-warm down-duvet and another blanket, plus some of these woven carpet-things. Whatever the outcome with my progress on Tonga next winter I'm a bit better prepared to face it: I'll have 2 down-duvets and 2 blankets on top of each other to hide under, and plenty of these woven things to screw, attach with pegs or whatever to keep the cold out. Isn't this awesome 😃???

    Sent from my SM-G900FD using Tapatalk
    fair winds, Dody

    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain

  8. #183
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    April 2008, Chipiona, Spain

    Chipiona turned out to be a lively little Spanish town with a lot of character, I really liked it, shame I had to go!

    Next morning checkout in the Marina and moving over to the fueldock. The security-guy had kept his word, I only had to pay for one night and the staff was super-friendly. When everything was filled up to the rim with Diesel it was time to go.







    When we left I found it quite extraordiary to notice the distinct line between the waters of the Rio Guadalquivir and the Atlantic Ocean:



    Now we were heading towards another River, also starting with a “G” so don’t get confused: the Rio Guadiana.

    The Rio Guadiana has a lot less traffic, coming from far away inland and winding it’s way over more than 800 km down to the sea. It forms part of a natural border between Spain and Portugal in the south of Portugal. Once you are past the little village of Pomarao you’re on Portuguese territory and you won’t be able to navigate further than Mertola where they built a bridge, so you can’t actually reach the Spanish border again. It is very peaceful on this river with lots of nature all around.

    I was actually hoping to find a nice anchorage upriver, but when I arrived at the mouth of the Rio Guadiana night had come, it was pitch-black and no moon in sight. The weather was calm and the tide was coming in, so I wanted to give it a try. With the depthsounder and Radar running we went past the little towns of Ayamonte on the Spanish side and Vila Real de San Antonio on the Portuguese side, both with Marinas. The suspension-bridge came closer, which should, with 21 m clearance at highwater, be no problem at all for us but like always it felt as if it would not be enough :-D. We went past the bridge but it was impossible to see something and I certainly didn’t want to run aground. So I turned around and docked at the visitor’s pontoon in Vila Real de San Antonio, welcome to Portugal! We had made it without anything breaking or going wrong and my "sticks" were still where they were meant to be, yipppeee !!!



    There were heaps of things on my list. First of course the new chainplate. But also my 3rd forestay was still laying curled up on our portside pilots-berth, the new furling-gears needed to be installed, my windgenerator, the solar-panels, I needed a new liferaft, I wanted new seals on my hydraulic ram which was leaking a little, do something about my compass because it wasn't good and wasn't clever to use the one mounted at the bulkhead in front of the cockpit (which was a temporary solution and did work ok), some electrics and there was quite some more.
    Last edited by Dody; 08-14-2017 at 01:56 PM.

  9. #184
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    I have no particular comment about the repairs in progress,but I am enjoying this thread.

  10. #185
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thank you John! I'm sure there will be plenty of ideas popping up you'll be able to help out a novice like me in "re-(boat)building". Don't hesitate please, if something comes to your mind! You are more than welcome!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-14-2017 at 07:32 PM.

  11. #186
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Dody, I just got back online after a weekend away and I see I have some catching up to do here. Looking forward to it!

    Cheers,
    Last edited by cstevens; 08-15-2017 at 06:23 PM.
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  12. #187
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Just caught up. Love the story so far Dody. And I think this is the first time I've seen a photo of Tonga in the water and gotten the full view of here. Such an interesting boat! I like her a lot. With that center cockpit and windshield she seems very much a product of 60s European design, like a Riva or a Baglietto with sails.
    - Chris

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  13. #188
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks Chris! Talking about the windshield. Well, I know it's still lightyears away or at least feels like it ... I had managed to take it off without any damage, but the aluminium-frames are toast. It is tempered glass what was used. Certainly a nice thing and the glass is fine. I guess I even might find the profiles somewhere to replace the ones which are toast. The thing is I do want to go where waves can do a lot of damage to a structure like this, at the same time I would like to have some viz all around. And I would like a more permanent shelter than a glass enclosure with canvas on the top (sprayhood I mean). I'm on the lookout for many years to find something that keeps a similar classic appearance, is not intrusive, but strong and gives me shelter.

    Not long ago friends of mine (Claudia and Jurgen of La Belle Epoque) had done the Northwest-Passage from Greenland to Alaska in company with a French boat called ISATIS. The doghouse they've got is coming very close to what I was thinking of. Got to dig out the 2 photos I've got, you can see it much better there what I mean, for the moment this is one I found on Internet. It's not very good insofar as it doesn't show what I mean, will try to find the other 2:



    They are now in Patagonia, then to South Georgia and are planning to come visit me in Nazare next autumn and take the boat out of the water for some extensive maintenance here, and will bring me heaps of more pictures of ISATIS. Can't wait to see them ! First my friends, but also the pictures of course!!!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-16-2017 at 02:56 PM.

  14. #189
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    And just in case someone is wondering about progress???

    A few nights ago I woke up with one of my ribs hurting like hell. No idea what I've done wrong, but it was impossible to get anything done. Today I was finally feeling much better and got the final adjustments and sanding done on the knees I had been working on. Still a bit of fillering to be done tomorrow morning before my coffeebreak and then!!!

    I've already dug out the varnish and the turpentine, a nice brush and the first coat can go on. Really looking forward to it!!!

    But the next days not much more than the varnishing will happen as I've got to make a little Bimini-extension for a friend first and some other small canvas-bits. Not too bad actually, keeps me from making a mess upstairs and spoiling my varnish !

  15. #190
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Yes, the windshield does seem more appropriate for sunning in the French Riviera than beating into a gale off of Patagonia. Probably best to replace it with something a bit more suited to how you will be using Tonga. Still an interesting detail. Glad your rib is better! I broke one last year. Not fun. Actually I did it twice. Once when lifting my dog off the deck (dumb) and then just as it had finally healed I stepped into the open hatch on the aft deck and broke it again (even dumber).
    - Chris

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Oh, nearly forgot, I've got a question for our woodworking-specialists.

    I got me this lovely Stanley handplane and was really desperate to try it out. Today with the plywood I had to shorten a piece. What had to come off wasn't big enough to get the jigsaw out, but it would take a moment with the beltsander. Hey, let's try the plane. I wouldn't have hesitated with my electrical plane I think (but so far never tried on ply), but this one somehow didn't feel happy, so after the first 2 strokes I stopped and went on with the beltsander.

    Then it came to me that maybe using a handplane with plywood is not a good idea, as the grain in the different layers has different directions and then there is also the glue - in contrast to proper timber - and I might damage the blade.

    Is this correct or are people using hand planes for plywood?

    I'm asking this stupid question because I've never worked with a hand plane.
    Last edited by Dody; 08-16-2017 at 04:58 PM.

  17. #192
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Yes, the windshield does seem more appropriate for sunning in the French Riviera than beating into a gale off of Patagonia. Probably best to replace it with something a bit more suited to how you will be using Tonga. Still an interesting detail. Glad your rib is better! I broke one last year. Not fun. Actually I did it twice. Once when lifting my dog off the deck (dumb) and then just as it had finally healed I stepped into the open hatch on the aft deck and broke it again (even dumber).
    Gosh, I don't envy you, that must have been terrible breaking it twice so short after another. I mean this was already quite painful but it was only 3 or 4 days. Make a rib heal takes ages of pain what people tell me.

    Yes, the windshield. It's a shame, but it's not good and it's not clever in my case.

  18. #193
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    ^^^ Yes it was extremely painful - especially when trying to sleep. But mostly it was infuriating because I couldn't get anything done for weeks and weeks, and also because I felt completely stupid for doing it once, and then doubly stupid for doing it again.
    - Chris

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  19. #194
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Oh, nearly forgot, I've got a question for our woodworking-specialists.

    I got me this lovely Stanley handplane and was really desperate to try it out. Today with the plywood I had to shorten a piece. What had to come off wasn't big enough to get the jigsaw out, but it would take a moment with the beltsander. Hey, let's try the plane. I wouldn't have hesitated with my electrical plane I think (but so far never tried on ply), but this one somehow didn't feel happy, so after the first 2 strokes I stopped and went on with the beltsander.

    Then it came to me that maybe using a handplane with plywood is not a good idea, as the grain in the different layers has different directions and then there is also the glue - in contrast to proper timber - and I might damage the blade.

    Is this correct or are people using hand planes for plywood?

    I'm asking this stupid question because I've never worked with a hand plane.
    A hand plane on ply is fine, but it needs to be wicked sharp and will blunt quickly. Depending what you are doing, a small angle grinder with a 16 or 24 grit sanding disc is a really great tool. You can do surprisingly accurate work with a light touch, or remove great gobs of wood in no time flat if you need to.

  20. #195
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    A hand plane on ply is fine, but it needs to be wicked sharp and will blunt quickly. Depending what you are doing, a small angle grinder with a 16 or 24 grit sanding disc is a really great tool. You can do surprisingly accurate work with a light touch, or remove great gobs of wood in no time flat if you need to.
    Thanks Phil, I guess I'll skip using a hand plane on ply for the mo. For sharpening I've got a bench-grinder and a double-sided oilstone only at the moment, and I have to admit that, although I'm slowly getting better with my chisels, I definitely can't call me a crack at sharpening. The blade on the hand plane is wider than my biggest chisel, so I'll have to make me keep it longer at the perfect angle when I'm still struggling to hold it at the correct angle anyway. The longer I manage to keep it sharp with only slight sharpening the better, so it'll be a definite no no.

    Got one of these sanding-discs for my angle grinder and plenty of 24 grit paper. But for some reason I always end up with a hollow in the center of what I'm sanding as opposed to a flat angular surface. Something very useful for hollowing out planks, but in this case I would like to end up with a flat and angular surface. Which I have no problem to achieve with my beltsander. But you're right, I could get rid of the bigger stuff with the angle grinder and then get it correct with the beltsander. That is, till I've got more experience with the disc on the angle-grinder. I know it can be done, because Albertino (the shipwright) is using it very often and he achieves flat surfaces with ease. We'll be getting there one day, I'm sure!!!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-17-2017 at 03:14 PM.

  21. #196
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Now that the owners next door have been here and know about what happened last Friday ...

    There was heaps of black smoke and flames coming through 2 hatches risking the tarpaulin (which was still over the mainsail-boom) to catch fire and with the prevailing wind burn the whole place down, including Tonga. We tried what we could with buckets and water-hoses, fortunately the fire-brigade arrived as we didn't manage to get the fire under control, and these pics were taken later.






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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    I actually only wanted to flick a bit of wood-putty on my knees today, get the first coat of varnish on them and then proceed to canvas-work for today. Well, it didn't happen ...
    To start with I couldn't find my wood-putty. It was in the aftcabin before I took everything out, I know exactly where, so it shouldn't be a problem to locate it. No way. I searched the whole ship and then started digging in my workshop. 4 hours later still no success. Couldn't find my wood-glue either (which I would have stowed in the same place), damn, grrrrrr!!!!!

    I could and should have left it. I'm sure everybody else would have managed to just chuck some varnish on pieces you probably won't see later anyway and be fine. But no, I couldn't give up. What else is there I could substitute it with? I didn't want to use Epoxy-Filler. I had some putty for windows people use to mix with red-lead-paint to purchase seams. No. I also had some cray - bought it to experiment when I saw a fisherman mixing it with Antifouling after he got launched and had to be taken out of the water again when he discovered a leak. They caulked the leak and then used this mixture over the caulking. Hm ... I could try it. If I mix the varnish with this cray, I wonder what comes out of it? So I did.



    It actually dissolved nicely in the varnish and gave quite a good consistency, was easy to apply and kind of self-levelling. Will be surprised how it will turn out tomorrow after it had plenty of time to dry!

    And by the way, tonight I realized there was one box I didn't look in and I'm sure that's where it's hiding - got to get all these boxes on top moved off again tomorrow, coz some of what is in there I'll gonna need one of these days. Wish I would be a bit better organized!!!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-17-2017 at 04:59 PM.

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    I've found the 2 pictures I was talking about earlier concerning the doghouse I am thinking of one day in the future for Tonga. It's the rounded one on the right:



    and this is how it looks like from the side:



    I'll find out of course, but I think it would suit Tonga well. What's your ideas about it?

  24. #199
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    And I got the second coat of varnish on both sides


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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    they look good. what is cray? looks kike it works well.

    jim

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks jim!

    I think it's chalk, but I don't know for sure.

    Just flipped them over, sanded and got the last coat on the backside (which doesn't look as good as the visible side). In case you can zoom these pics in, you can see the filler best on the one in front and the one behind on the left where I fillered over the staples. Sure, it's whitish, which was to be expected, and I could have sanded a bit more, but you can't see it when installed. I might be going a bit over the top with all this, but once you've seen desintegrating plywood as many as I have seen, you will never ever again not paint/varnish the edges or leave any of it exposed without something on it. Even Marineply.



    Only 11 o'clock here and it's bleeding hot. Great excuse, I'm off for the beach now !

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    We're moving away from the knees for a moment to some canvas-work. A friend of mine sailed his boat over to Barcelona/Spain where he is working, to move aboard and not have to rent an apartment. As soon as he arrived he was suffering from the heat over there and has asked me to make a cover for his deck. He had something in mind that would rest on the boom of the mast and spread out towards the sides. It should roughly be some tarpaulin, 3 x 3 m.

    It was a bit of a challenge to sew the 3.5 m panels together in the center without humps and bumps, as always the canvas (310 gr/m2) wanting to go it's own way, but perseverance won in the end. Will post some of the process on ron II's sewing-thread, but here a pic with what I had to come up with



    White canvas and steel and oil all around is not a happy match, but in the end it worked out fine without spots. Very happy about it!

    Didn't have any white left and Mario was happy to use blue as the rest on his boat is blue, so I did for the reinforcing. Looks quite fresh, I really like it!



    Grommets in front and aft so he can set it all up for marking along the guardrail



    and ready to go for a test on his boat in Barcelona





    He was suffering terribly from the heat over there, something he wasn't used to from here in Nazaré. Hope it helps!!!
    Last edited by Dody; 08-23-2017 at 04:43 AM.

  28. #203
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Oh, nearly forgot, I've got a question for our woodworking-specialists.

    I got me this lovely Stanley handplane and was really desperate to try it out. Today with the plywood I had to shorten a piece. What had to come off wasn't big enough to get the jigsaw out, but it would take a moment with the beltsander. Hey, let's try the plane. I wouldn't have hesitated with my electrical plane I think (but so far never tried on ply), but this one somehow didn't feel happy, so after the first 2 strokes I stopped and went on with the beltsander.

    I'm asking this stupid question because I've never worked with a hand plane.
    A new plane might just need tuning.
    I bought one years ago and thought that it was a useless piece of junk as it barely worked. Then I found out that planes need some tweaking. Once I knew what was needed, I had a nice tool after a little work with files and sandpaper.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzDygUaWGj0
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  29. #204
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    What Dave said.
    Also hand planes don't like plywood much. They have to be wicked sharp to cut the end grain lams cleanly, and the glue bluntens them quite quickly.
    A sharp low angle block plane is ideal for final fits and removing saw marks.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  30. #205
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    That boom awning looks great Dody. Lovely work! It looks like my introduction to sewing will not happen quite yet as we are going a different direction for bunks (hanging cots, as suggested by Rumars) but I'll be looking for inspiration from you when the time comes.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #206
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    great work on the awning. looks like you can do it all..but if you keep this sort of stuff up you will be in port longer than 2 years! i know you are helping friends and probably paying it worward and that is always good.

    jim

  32. #207
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Awning looks great. We lived on a 55 foot steel boat in Papua New Guinea for a while. I made a simple but very effective shade awning using a straw coloured shade cloth. It came in a roll 4 metres wide. I made up cross supports using PVC plumbing pipe. Clamped the cloth onto the pipe with small quarter sections of the same pipe, screwed on through the shade cloth. Slung it over the boom and tied the ends of each pipe with lanyards down to the safety rail. Shade cloth lets the wind through, so it coped well with strong wind when neccesary. Easy to roll up to stow on deck when sailing. And that stuff lasts forever.

  33. #208
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    A new plane might just need tuning.
    I bought one years ago and thought that it was a useless piece of junk as it barely worked. Then I found out that planes need some tweaking. Once I knew what was needed, I had a nice tool after a little work with files and sandpaper.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzDygUaWGj0
    Thanks for this video Dave, it makes a lot of sense! It'll have to wait till Monday for me to do it and while I'm at it, I've also got 3 wooden planes. Will have to dig a bit around on youtube, I'm sure there's something I should do with them also to get it all setup and working nicely.

    My theory has been that, the better the tools are one uses, the better the chances to achieve an acceptable result - especially for people like me who haven't got a lifelong experience working with my hands. Apart from chisels and 2 different handsaws, so far I've mainly been using power-tools but would love to learn how to use the real tools now!

  34. #209
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Also hand planes don't like plywood much. They have to be wicked sharp to cut the end grain lams cleanly, and the glue bluntens them quite quickly.
    A sharp low angle block plane is ideal for final fits and removing saw marks.
    Thanks Nick, this confirms what I was wondering.

    What should I understand by "low angle" block plane? The one I used to try on this plywood was a Stanley No. 4 and it says on the blade it should be sharpened to an angle of 25 Degrees. Would that be "low angle" or is low angle lower than that?

  35. #210
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Thanks Nick, this confirms what I was wondering.

    What should I understand by "low angle" block plane? The one I used to try on this plywood was a Stanley No. 4 and it says on the blade it should be sharpened to an angle of 25 Degrees. Would that be "low angle" or is low angle lower than that?
    No a number 4 is a smoothing plane.
    This is a low angle block plane


    The blade is set at a low angle, and "upside down" and the mouth is adjustable for very fine cuts on wild grain.

    This looks like a knock off, but might be OK http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FULLY-ADJU...EAAOSwv-NWXyUb
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 08-24-2017 at 03:23 PM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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