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Thread: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

  1. #246
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Done heaps of research the last days about tools and sharpening tools, I'm slowly getting really impatient as there is no progress on Tonga (alright, and little Max had to go to the vet, grocery-shopping etc. had to be done too). But what is the point in having good planes with a dull blade???

    I've ordered some Japanese waterstones now. Not the real stone ones because they are a bit too far out of my price-range, but the artificial type of the Japanese waterstones made in Japan. And, as you need to keep them flat of course to get a good result, a special tool to get them flat again.

    All this research made me change my tactics with sharpening my chisels too. So far I had only used 1 double-sided oilstone (and the bench-grinder of course), but I had another one laying around still in it's packing which looked white. This, I found out, is a ceramic stone you chuck in water for 10 Minutes or so, it's got grain 150 on one side and 320 on the other (which is not the same as with sandpaper). So, in preparation for the arrival of the Japanese waterstones, Sunday was my day to try out the ceramic stone with my chisels to do some more when the other stones arrive. Done 6 hours, still not finished, but got the nicks out where I had hit some nails, got the edges straight and fairly sharp.

    Getting some bolts and nuts and bits and pieces today I suddenly saw a Portuguese Enxo c/cabeza Nacional No. 1 (which means something like "with national type head no. 1") laying in the Farmers Cooperative. Albertino (the shipwright) is often using one of them and he can do amazing stuff with it. It was only a bit over 20 Euro and felt really good in the hand, so bought it. As it happens, Albertino was in the yard when I came back and got really excited that they still can be had. Apparently it was not quite right, they had welded the top of the blade to the frame which is bolted to the handle, so I cut the weld off with the anglegrinder and a thin inox-disc. According to Albertino the angle between the blade and the handle would be better if a bit wider open, so I'm gonna change that tomorrow and insert a wedge as is done on his to fix the blade in position. And of course, in his excitement, immediately the oilstone came out and he had to sharpen it for me. Just for the fun of it I tested a tiny bit, and it's an awesome tool.

    Now, again doing some research on internet, as in his opinion the blade should bend outwards not inwards ... on all the photos I found on internet the blade is shown the way as on my Enxo, bending inwards. I guess I will keep it like this, but change the angle slightly and tighten it up with a wedge. This thing is scary sharp now ... in one of the info's on the internet it said that, as soon as you sharpened the Enxo, get yourself some leather and make a cover for the blade, otherwise you will constantly destroy all your other tools of they damage this one. Which is true and counts for my chisels now as well. I've kept the leather from some worn-down boots, so, tomorrow I'll make a little bag where my chisels are protected and a cover for the blade of the Enxo.

    Will make some pics of Albertino's Enxo and the one I've got now tomorrow.
    Last edited by Dody; 09-05-2017 at 07:29 PM.

  2. #247
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Alright, it's about Portuguese Enxň's now, a tool used for boatbuilding for many hundreds of years but also for a lot of other purposes. Well, that is, at least in Portugal. No idea about other countries, but for some reason being curious I couldn't find them mentioned elsewhere.

    This is how they would look like:



    The one on the left is the one I just bought in a shop around here (and had already modified a bit), the one on the right is at least 3 generations old and belongs to Albertino (the local shipwright). If you have a closer look at the blades, you will not only notice that the angle of the blade is different, but also, that the blade on the one on the left is curved inwards, and on the right it's curved outwards.

    That's how the older one looks from the front:



    and here a proper picture of it



    As I found out today, there is a purpose behind it (as with everything).

    With the one I bought, in it's original state, you can hollow out timber, giving it a rounded shape and it's mainly used by carpenters. With the blade the other way around, like Albertino's, you can do square cuts when working on timber.



    He showed me what happens if he tries the same with my blade being the other way around, and with the first hit it was clear that this is impossible. They were joking, saying "the real woodworkers use the blade the other way around, all the others are only playing with timber :-D".

    First I had to get the angle of the blade right on my Enxň so it would work nicely. With the beltsander I sanded off a triangle not touching the initial bit where the blade comes off the handle, but first 3 mm and another 3 mm coming from the top. Then I turned the blade around and took a bit of timber off the lower front of the handle, so the blade would go in this way and be properly held with a wedge and a screw on the top. As it is now, I can still swap the blade and use it the other way around if I would like to do something with a rounded shape (would then have to use the same wedge from below).





    similar like this (that was the first stage)



    Well, I changed the wedge a little bit ... The reason of a different thickness of timber in front is to protect one's knuckles from splinters. There is still this little edge at the bottom I want to change, it's not right for me.
    Last edited by Dody; 09-05-2017 at 07:49 PM.

  3. #248
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    When I finally had it all sorted, Albertino gave it a try and is quite happy with the result (aaahhh, and I can see that now in this picture that his hand is further up with the index-finger gripping the edge on the top, maybe, if I try like this, the bit sticking out on the bottom of the handle won't give me blisters ...).



    As I said yesterday, I wanted to make some blade-protection for the Enxň and also for my chisels with leather I had kept from some worn-out boots. Did it the quick way but quite happy with the result



    The grip-bit you see there was originally meant to help you get into the boots. I just left it in place, wondering if it would be helpful if I should need to tie it to the handle one day. Same with the bucket I made for the chisels

    Last edited by Dody; 09-05-2017 at 06:53 PM.

  4. #249
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    wow! nice job on the leathers. the tool looks interesting. i am not sure many 'mericans would know how to use one.

    jim

  5. #250
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks jim! With the little bit I tried, this Enxň feels like super-easy to use as long as you keep your fingers far away from the blade. It has quite a bit of weight and does amazing stuff. On Internet, I found something about it from a book "American Woodworker" and it explains quite a lot https://books.google.pt/books?id=ivs...20Enxo&f=false

  6. #251
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    That, is an amazing cutting tool Dody! Adz like but much more versatile!

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  7. #252
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Please, may I ask for your advice?

    My honing-guide hasn't arrived yet, my block-plane and the waterstones have. Today I started doing the spacers to get the side-deckbeams level and could really do with using the little block-plane. Trouble is, I'm supposed to hone the blade before using it (and I'm supposed to take the rust-inhibitor off the plane and tool-wax her before first use, the wax is ordered and paid for but not on it's way yet - which I actually should do with the Stanley No. 4 as well (both, the honing and the wax and some more with the Stanley).

    The question is: if I'll do the honing very carefully without a honing-guide and just by hand, what kind of damage could I inflict to the blade in the worst case? Would it be okay to use the block-plane out of the box without removing the rust-inhibitor and without protecting her with tool-wax for, let's say from tomorrow morning till Monday midday? I'm talking of a Veritas low angle block-plane (and a Stanley No. 4), both new.

    Thank you heaps in advance!
    Last edited by Dody; 09-07-2017 at 04:00 PM.

  8. #253
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Lots of people do not use tool wax, so you can live without it until the wax arrives. Some do not wax the sole at all so that there will be no wax contamination of a glueing surface.
    Honing should only take a few strokes, make sure that you keep the back flat, do not rock the blade when honing off the wire edge from the back.
    Carry on, and just re do it when the guide does arrive.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #254
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Awesome, thanks Nick!

  10. #255
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  11. #256
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Fits in every pocket, lightweight, always around when you happen to need them, I love them Denise! Only, I've got my doubts that they are good for more than extreme emergencies, unfortunately. Whatever source I came across it was said that the bigger your sharpening-stones, the better and easier to do the sharpening and get a good result. Soooo, for me as a beginner, I don't think they would be any use. Still, great idea Denise, thank you !

    PS: have you tried them, are they any good for experienced people like you?

  12. #257
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    Oh yes I use them quite a bit when working hard wood like white oak, planes and chisels need to be scary Sharp.

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  13. #258
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    This guy goes into pretty good detail. I have Grinders in wheels and Diamond sharpeners Japanese water stones traditional waterstones but like I mentioned earlier on what works on my chisels and plane blades is my water wheel and the diamond home either the card type or the larger DMT type https://youtu.be/FBaqN2bjCx8

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  14. #259
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thank you for the link Denise! I had my first sharpening-session today and I think it went fairly well, at least the iron would stick to my finger-nail when I stopped for today ...

    Fairly well. Friday morning I found out that my honing-guide is in the truck for delivery and it arrived around midday. When I opened the package it turned out that the little wheel at the bottom had a lot of play on the axis. Which meant adjusting it according to the lever could not give me the desired 25 Degrees for the initial bevel.

    I continued with my spacers and other stuff on the deck and sat down in the evening to work out a solution. Suddenly I remembered having bought this digital angle-meter some while ago, it should be possible to adjust the angle with this one.

    Today was first taking the bicycle up the (partly) very steep hill for a few kilometers to the vet to get more medicine for poor little Max (he had badly twisted his leg between 2 planks some weeks ago. I was off for coffee-break and he was sitting under the space I had been working at to see what I was doing. Coming back I started with hammer and crowbar, not realizing he was directly below. He tried to run away and that's how it happened. Then there was a misunderstanding with the vet and the one there the day after the accident which meant he didn't get the right treatment. And in the end it all got infected ... healing nicely now.) When I came back to the port they had shut off the water for some repairs in the whole port-area. Not really what you want when working with Japanese waterstones. When they still hadn't turned the water back on around 3 pm, I went off to buy 2 jerrycans ŕ 5 L bottled water.

    After setting it all up, I thought I better start with the Stanley No. 4 blade, which wouldn't upset me as much if it shouldn't turn out as I want it to be. I adjusted the honing guide with the digital angle-meter to 25 Degrees and started. After maybe 10 or so strokes I had a look at the bevel and was quite shocked - either my stone was not level, I had done something wrong, or the iron wasn't manufactured accurately.

    Right, let's first presume the stone is not level. I sanded it with the tool I had bought with it, but the stone was perfectly alright.

    I checked if there might be a fault with me handling the iron or the honing guide doing funny tricks, but no. So, I thought, there must have been quite some imprecision going on with the manufacturing of the iron, as my sanding showed quite irregular on the blade. I kept on going and kept on going, and maybe 1.5 hours later I had the bevel right, from the tip to the end.

    Flip it over to the back side. Thanks by the way Nick, to tell me not to rock it! In most of the videos I've seen they would move the flat side of the iron from the outside to the inside going up and down the stone. I tried that and caught me a few times with it rocking. I then changed tactics, moved it slightly sideways to maybe 45 Degrees to the long side of the stone and like this I managed to avoid it rocking.

    When this was done with the 700 grit, I moved to the 1000 grit and then the 5000.

    Working with these stones I really liked it, but had to stop around 6:30 coz dinner was ready. Well, I'll see how far I get tomorrow. This one still needs the 30 Degree tiny bevel with all 3 stones (and the edges rounded), then the Veritas, and then there are 3 irons of wooden planes waiting to be done, and I guess I should do some proper job with my chisels too.

    Now I really hope that from then on re-sharpening takes heaps shorter when I keep doing this regularly!

    Ah, and Denise, these credit-card-size diamond stones - one would use them to re-sharpen I guess, not to get a complete new bevel on a blade, or am I wrong? I can't see me yet getting a new bevel without a honing guide and they are really too small to use one.

    What I am wondering about ... is this normal that a new plane iron is manufactured so much out of shape? I mean, they've got all the tools in the factory, why not set them up properly? I don't understand this ...
    Last edited by Dody; 09-09-2017 at 08:21 PM.
    fair winds, Dody

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  15. #260
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    I think most Crafts People hone their chisels in between major grindings because if we grind every time we need to sharpen the tools would get awful short awful fast The Only Exception would be on the wood lathe, the exception on the wood lathe tools would be the new type that have carbide tips.

    One should never assume new anything is perfect just like plywood is not always Square from the factory, plane blades and chisels may not be as sharp as they could be

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    This makes perfectly sense to me Denise and is clever to do. Especially when one works with a 25 and 30 degree angle as seems to be important with planes.

    Now I still haven't understood why one needs 25 and 30 degrees yet. And if this is needed I'm convinced now that it would be possible to get both of them sharpened at the correct angle without loosing too much material if you start working on the 25 degrees without going all the way to the tip and then go up to 30. Whatever, it seems to be important and maybe one day even someone like me will get it.

    I didn't expect this iron to be perfectly sharp. But to be honest, I expected at least that they would have given the bevel a 25-degree angle instead of a wobbly affair not resembling anything.

    Will be surprised how the other irons turn out ...

    Whow, I didn't expect that with the plywood!

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Today, after altogether about 11.5 hours of working on this Stanley blade, I had it at a point where I decided it's enough now. I'm not gonna touch you any more. You do your job as it is, and if you don't I'll just chuck you in the bin and that's it. I really had enough of this miserable thing! Lacking something else for the moment I wiped it off with sewing-machine oil, assembled the plane and moved the frog a bit forward, wrapped it up in its box and took it upstairs on board. Haven't tested it yet, I guess I better calm down a bit before doing so.

    Next was the Veritas-blade. I was prepared to face the same misery as with the Stanley. Right, let's get it over and done with. I want to use this thing tomorrow!!

    The blade came in a little plastic-case, separate from the plane. There was a little leaflet inside

    "This Veritas blade is sharp and ready for final honing. Unless the blade face has been scratched, only the bevel will ever need to be resharpened.

    The blade bevel has been ground to an average roughness of 16 microinches (0,000016") or better. The face has been machine lapped to an average roughness of 5 microinches (0.000005") or better and to a flatness tolerance of 0.00005" or better. ..."

    The bevel was correct of course , and it only took me a few minutes to hone it on all three stones to the 30 degree angle.

    Gosh, if I had known all this before, all these hours wasted on the Stanley blade which I don't need tomorrow and still don't know if all my effort is for the bin. I could have checked if I could get one the same size from Veritas and could have been done with it! For the hours I have spent I could have bought 20 or more Veritas blades and not ending up in anger!!!

    However, I started with the wood-planes. They are all handmade in Portugal, bought in Portugal, and were not expensive at all, so my expectations weren't too high. The one I started with was made of A2 inox, and the guy making her went into a big effort to get the blade right and even polished it. Unfortunately he was using a sharpening stone which was hollowed out in the center and there was no sharp edge at the end of the bevel. He tried his best and that's what counts, it's honest. Got 3 hours into that iron and would love to go on tomorrow, but actually, I should get on with my deck and leave this for next weekend.

    Well, let's wait how I feel like when I wake up tomorrow! But nights are getting a bit more fresh already ...

  18. #263
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    11.5 hrs? Yipes!

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  19. #264
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Today, after altogether about 11.5 hours of working on this Stanley blade, I had it at a point where I decided it's enough now. I'm not gonna touch you any more. You do your job as it is, and if you don't I'll just chuck you in the bin and that's it. I really had enough of this miserable thing! Lacking something else for the moment I wiped it off with sewing-machine oil, assembled the plane and moved the frog a bit forward, wrapped it up in its box and took it upstairs on board. Haven't tested it yet, I guess I better calm down a bit before doing so.

    Next was the Veritas-blade. I was prepared to face the same misery as with the Stanley. Right, let's get it over and done with. I want to use this thing tomorrow!!

    The blade came in a little plastic-case, separate from the plane. There was a little leaflet inside

    "This Veritas blade is sharp and ready for final honing. Unless the blade face has been scratched, only the bevel will ever need to be resharpened.

    The blade bevel has been ground to an average roughness of 16 microinches (0,000016") or better. The face has been machine lapped to an average roughness of 5 microinches (0.000005") or better and to a flatness tolerance of 0.00005" or better. ..."

    The bevel was correct of course , and it only took me a few minutes to hone it on all three stones to the 30 degree angle.

    Gosh, if I had known all this before, all these hours wasted on the Stanley blade which I don't need tomorrow and still don't know if all my effort is for the bin. I could have checked if I could get one the same size from Veritas and could have been done with it! For the hours I have spent I could have bought 20 or more Veritas blades and not ending up in anger!!!

    However, I started with the wood-planes. They are all handmade in Portugal, bought in Portugal, and were not expensive at all, so my expectations weren't too high. The one I started with was made of A2 inox, and the guy making her went into a big effort to get the blade right and even polished it. Unfortunately he was using a sharpening stone which was hollowed out in the center and there was no sharp edge at the end of the bevel. He tried his best and that's what counts, it's honest. Got 3 hours into that iron and would love to go on tomorrow, but actually, I should get on with my deck and leave this for next weekend.

    Well, let's wait how I feel like when I wake up tomorrow! But nights are getting a bit more fresh already ...
    Now if you were a hairy bloke like me, you could test the sharpness by shaving the hair off your arm.
    Just throwing that out there, see if the cat drags it back in.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Well, how should I put it Denise, this iron was completely out of shape to start with - and that's what upset me so much from the beginning. Next thing, but that's my own fault, a coarser stone would have sorted the main problem I was faced with much quicker I guess. But, I didn't have one long enough to use with the honing guide. I'm gonna change that for the future and will get me a coarser stone which is long enough.

    But, you see, that's the problems beginners like me have to face when they don't know, have never worked with their proper hands, and don't own a workshop handed down from generations - or setup by oneself over many many years, with heaps of useful tools. And learning how to use them properly.

    It is as it is. I can't change my past but can only do whatever is in my power to arrange matters better for me for the time to come. And, as it looks like, there is lots more challenges waiting for me to be dealt with ...

    As it is, Albertino (the shipwright) is called from one emergency by the fishing-boats to the next. Understandably they've got priority, coz it's their life and their income. One day I'll be gone to Scotland, Iceland and Patagonia, but they will still be here. Unless I'm lucky I'll have to get into replacing my planks and planking my stern myself. Reading about what you and others are doing does help me a lot. And doing practical stuff on Tonga.

    Well, we'll see how it goes. One job at a time and then the next ...
    Last edited by Dody; 09-10-2017 at 08:15 PM.

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Now if you were a hairy bloke like me, you could test the sharpness by shaving the hair off your arm.
    Just throwing that out there, see if the cat drags it back in.
    Hahhhahahhhhaaaa, great Nick, I absolutely love you comment!!!!

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    $15 plane but he shows how to sharpen. https://youtu.be/NhcDmlD0wSQ

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks, Denise! Ahem, I think I did something wrong. Could it be that with a bevel-up plane you don't do the 30 degree-bevel at the tip? Well, at least this guy doesn't, but I have ... grrrrrrrrr! Please, can someone confirm that?

    A bit of a chaotic day today ... sailing-friends had come back from Galicia/Spain but won't spend the winter here as originally planned, I know now that lobsters do make noises, and it was just a joke that one of my mates wanted to leave Avo Ricardo last night at Eduardo's birthday. The travellift hit the bow of one of the boats next to me and lifted it off it's forward supports. There was a big bang when she hit the ground but the car parked next to her didn't get damaged, nor the boat next to her. Victor with his sailing-boat "Sul" is back and is parked right next to me now (without damaging the radar-dome still attached to my mizzen-mast and sticking out a bit) which is quite nice - but the travellift stayed in place for the night, so tomorrow morning I've got to be there to prevent what can happen with Alberto driving it.

    Still, not a lot got done but I managed to give it a go with my low angle blockplane. Got to experiment a lot more to find out properly, but, at least, holding a small board upright with one hand, I managed to get these tiny and thin curly things coming out on the other side of the blade which look surprisingly equal to what they proudly show in the videos. Well, it's a start, and I'm quite happy with it .

  24. #269
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Thanks, Denise! Ahem, I think I did something wrong. Could it be that with a bevel-up plane you don't do the 30 degree-bevel at the tip? Well, at least this guy doesn't, but I have ... grrrrrrrrr! Please, can someone confirm that?
    I think that with the thin blade of a block plane you can get away without two bevels. On line advice is sharpen and hone at 25deg, so that it cuts at 45, which is the same angle as a bench plane.
    With the thicker iron of a bench plane you would be honing forever to achieve sharp.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Aiaiaiaiaiiiiii, that means right now I would be cutting at an angle of 50 degrees ... to which certainly follows that the pressure I've got to put on the plane to move her is more than with a 45 degree angle. And of course the result - at least for someone experienced - will be very different I guess.

    What would you suggest? The secondary bevel I made is fairly small and I don't think it would take me too many hours to sand it back to 25 degrees.

  26. #271
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Aiaiaiaiaiiiiii, that means right now I would be cutting at an angle of 50 degrees ... to which certainly follows that the pressure I've got to put on the plane to move her is more than with a 45 degree angle. And of course the result - at least for someone experienced - will be very different I guess.

    What would you suggest? The secondary bevel I made is fairly small and I don't think it would take me too many hours to sand it back to 25 degrees.
    I feel your pain.
    Use the coarsest stone, or aluminium oxide paper on a piece of glass or saw bench table that you have to knock it down then come back down through the grits again.

    P.S. I hope that you don't put a hone bevel on your chisels as well. They must be flat on both sides, so the you can use the chisel upside down in confined spaces.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  27. #272
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    Thanks Nick, great to have an instant reply!!!

    Never did this with my chisels, but also didn't take any precautions to get the exactly to 25 degrees. Maybe that's why some work better than others. But tge pla is to get them all in proper shape, probsbly next weekend if not earlier - there is far too much stuff standing around now with unfinished sharpening to make life comfortable for me.

    Just read some more in the leaflet that came with the plane. About sharpening they say "The low-angle block-plane has a bed angle of 12° and the blade comes honed at an angle of 25°. Since the blade is used bevel up, the effective cutting angle will be 37°.

    The 25° blade bevel is ideal for fine trimming-work on end-grain softwood and some hardwoods. Ring-porous hardwoods such as oak may require a 30° bevel to prevent edge failure. Simply hone the micro-bevel to the required angle.

    It is difficult to be definiteitive about many of these bevel angles. Some people never skew a block-plane in use; other people always skew it. If you normally use a blockplane in a skewed position, you can get away with lower bevel angles. If you are always working clear pine, you can get away with very low bevel angles. Only you know which woodyou will be working and how you will be working it. Experience will tell you what you can and cannot do.

    With yourbevel and cutting angles set for the demands of end-grain work, you will easily deal with parallel grain cutting ..."

    I haven’t got a clue how my habits concerning skewing will develop. For the next days it will be a bit of pine but mainly gamballa.

    As it is, with my 30° micro-bevel, in theory, I'm having a 42° cutting-angle. But I don't think this would make a big difference to my bench plane.

    I'm gonna leave it as it is for this week and experiment a bit, but for the coming weekend I really think it has to come off!



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  28. #273
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    A couple of degrees plus or minus isn't a big deal.Absolute sharpness is the important part and you must have enormous patience to spend eleven hours on one tool.

  29. #274
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Sooo glad to hear that John, thanks! Not that I'm planning to be much out and will try my best to keep with the angles someone some long time ago worked out to being the preferred ones, but it gives me a much much better feeling for my messing up|

    Not knowing this, the inevitable happened: I woke up around 4:30 this morning with a new idea in my head. I will keep this plane for as long as I live, and there might occur many situations in the future where I am happy to have a blade for this one with a 30 degree bevel at the tip. Why not leave it as it is, and order a new blade which I'll keep at the 25 degree angle without a micro-bevel? It's like making this plane into a more versatile tool having the toothed blade, one with a micro-bevel and one with the 25 degrees. I needed to order a coarser stone anyways, and also one who would be a bit more easy going with hardened steel and stainless. Sorted, and found a lovely deep sleep afterwards.

    Together with Camelia-Oil and some more stones I ordered a 3rd blade for my low angle block-plane this morning. No hassle to grind the one I've got back down, no worries, and it's already on it's way. Gosh, life can be so easy! I haven't got a clue what drove me to spend 11.5 hours on this Stanley blade, and I'm still far too upset to have tried the Stanley No. 4. Well, at least it was the weekend, so not purposed to working on Tonga but playing-time and trying out how my new Japanese waterstones would work. For sure I'm not gonna repeat this ever again. Well, at least, as long as I'm not sitting high and dry on the other side of a reef far away from civilization and in desperate need to get my tools working to fix her and get her back into the element .
    Last edited by Dody; 09-12-2017 at 05:17 PM.

  30. #275
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    ^ Now you need to explore the world of leather goods and stropping compound.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Ayaiai, you're touching a wound point there Nick :-D!

    In these videos I had a look at, I saw them finishing everything off with a piece of leather fixed to some surface and was wondering if I could sort out something smallish with another pair of boots I couldn't bring it over my heart to throw away and, again, kept the leather.

    Now, something is still puzzling me. These guys apply a stick of something to the leather before using it, but nobody mentions what it is.

    What could that be?

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  32. #277
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Stropping compound. You can also buy leather wheels to put on a bench grinder or in a drill in a stand, to take the work out of it.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  33. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Stropping compound. You can also buy leather wheels to put on a bench grinder or in a drill in a stand, to take the work out of it.
    Dody did you get a roller type guide? You seem to have stopped posting pictures like you used to I've been using Tapatalk it works great for pictures


    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Yes Denise, it's a roller-type. Trouble is that the little wheel has a huge amount of play on the axis. So, everytime I insert an iron I first have to check if the angle is correct. Looks like this:



    Facebook ... it's getting on my nerves. The photos I uploaded are automatically detected as being scam and blocked!!!




    Last edited by Dody; 09-15-2017 at 09:40 AM.

  35. #280
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Stropping compound. You can also buy leather wheels to put on a bench grinder or in a drill in a stand, to take the work out of it.
    Thanks Nick, I found it, even the people in Lisboa where I got the Borax from, sell it. Not sure though if I'll be overdoing it a bit now ...

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