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Thread: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

  1. #596
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    Thank you Brian and Chris! Some more tomorrow, I've done something stupid and just came back from hospital. I slipped with wet shoes and both arms full going down my companionway-ladder, cut my thumb in the instance and hit my knee against one of the steel-plates on the backside of one of my floors. No blood no sympathy, but there was blood. After fixing up the thumb I got my jeans off to investigate the knee. A deep cut, 10 cm long and the kneecap was showing, I nearly fainted when I saw it. So I glued a rough bandage over it and drove up to the hospital. Nice people and they stiched me up. Now I'm supposed to give the leg heaps of rest for the next 10 days at least!!! Grrrrrrrrrrr@@rrrr!!!

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    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  2. #597
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Ouch! So sorry to hear that Dody. Get better soon!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  3. #598
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    wow, so bad about your fall. but i must say you are one tough lady. hope you heal up well. one more good reason to have a car. now be more careful!

    jim

  4. #599
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thank you jim! It dawned on me in the meantime that driving myself with a gaping wound on my knee maybe was not really the thing to do. It had turned dark a bit before, there was no life around on the boatyard, I couldn't see a way to fix it myself with the materials I had at hand, and I was a little bit scared about having too much time to think about it while someone else might need time to dress or finish his coffee or come here to collect me or whatever. So I just got in the car and off I went. Carefully, I must say. And keeping me busy made me feel alright.

    In the early 90s I had kind of a similar situation in Bali/Indonesia. My ex-husband and I had rented 2 of these sweet little 185 2-stroke motorbikes and we were crisscrossing and exploring the island. It happened on the NE-side. We were on a gravel-road somewhere in the stix. The volcano Mt. Besakih had erupted 10 or 15 years ago, and the road in this corner never got fixed again. My ex-husband had stopped right behind a corner to watch some outrigger-canoes with colourful sails leaving to go fishing. Coming around the corner I saw him too late, managed to avoid a real collision but still go him at the elbow, kept my bike up for a bit more and then got the front-wheel into a trench and fell. Of course in shorts and T-shirt. Blood all over the place, my right leg hurting like hell. I sat down on the side of the road and needed some water, the little bit I had left wasn't enough. Some people with kids came down a hill, so I asked them for water. They started screaming and ran away (got told later that this was a completely remote village with it's own language, and hundred or more years ago the Dutch were stealing their children). The next hospital was 150 K away, there was no doctor around, no phones, no nothing. My bike was a bit damaged but the engine would still start. I got myself together and drove the 80 K to the place where we were staying at the time. The air-draft from driving on the blood running down nearly made me faint, so I had to stop several times in the beginning. The foot-break wouldn't work, as the pedal had broken off. When we got back it turned out the doctor would be in the next village Thursday the following week. So I cleaned the wounds as best as I could and took some rest. When I came back home 2 weeks later they found out I had a cracked ankle, the achilles-tendon was only held in place by a tiny thread, the wounds had become infected and and and.
    Last edited by Dody; 10-18-2018 at 11:10 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  5. #600
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks Chris!!!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  6. #601
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    The worst I ever heard of was something I read in a book, which was a documentation about accidents happening at sea. No guarantee though that the story is really true, but I believe it is:

    A guy was sailing singlehanded from San Francisco (or LA, I don't remember) to Hawaii. Somewhere halfway he had to sort out something on his masttop. To make his life easier to get up there he picked his harness into the spinnaker-halyard and attached a bucket on the other side which he tossed over board. The system seems to have worked to a certain height, when the bucket jumped out of the water. He fell on deck and broke his skull. Somehow he managed to stay alive and sail his boat further to Hawaii. About 50 Miles (don't remember exactly) before Hawaii they helicoptered him off, took him to hospital and he actually survived.

    I found that pretty impressive and will never forget it!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  7. #602
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    So happy to hear you had no real damage, thats great! I've been (trying to?) teach for a long time (28 yrs), in an undergraduate 4 year university program, and my task has been to try and get young, inexperienced would-be scientists to take the dangers and challenge of the ocean seriously, and its no easy task, and as you point out, things have changed a great deal, due in part to technology. A person brought up with screen-knowlege has, in many cases, no idea of what the reality of a disinterested ocean is like, and its not easy to bring that to their attention. In your case you know from direct experience what the ocean can bring, which means you suffer more when something comes your way. Hoping that the rest of the cyclone season leaves you safe!
    Brian
    Brian, this sounds to me a very very difficult task what you were doing. But I'm also very happy that someone had the hindsight that this needs to be part of the studies. It seems already next to impossible to understand for people in their earlier stages of sailing, although one might expect them to be interested in the subject for their own sake of happiness. I have the impression there are 2 groups. One group doesn't want to know so not to scare themselves. The other group goes direction of "screen-knowledge" as you pointed out. And I'm not sure, but it wouldn't surprise me if this will be getting worse even with "virtual adventures" becoming more and more popular.

    Quite a lot of people put to sea nowadays being convinced nothing can happen to them because they have all the latest gadgets. Which might be perfectly fine for coast-hopping and clearly even works - perfect conditions provided - for longer ocean-passages. It still makes me cringe when a new-to-sailing couple turns up with a boat they just bought (their first one) and tell you they've got two tablets to do their nav, one in the microwave just in case, and they are sailing to the Islands in the Pacific Ocean. Or, just a few days ago. We had 3 boats on passage to the Canaries here. All of the crews on their first voyage and relatively new to sailing, one British, one French and one German. The British and the German left 2 days before Hurricane Leslie hit, as the French told me "they didn't know what to do with this weather to come, they were itchy to sail on, so they left". For a passage of over 800 Miles, with smallish boats both of them (one a 25-footer), and the Hurricane going straight across their path. They will certainly learn their lesson one day, if not, the only thing I am capable to call it is "natural selection" as bad as it sounds. The French guys were delayed and could be convinced not to leave a safe port under these conditions.

    Edit: another "nice" and very frequent reply "Oh, but I don't need a Radar at all, I've got AIS!"
    Last edited by Dody; 10-19-2018 at 08:30 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  8. #603
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    We were weatherbound for a few days in Leixios, having had a late October departure from the UK, on a delivery to Tenerife. We had watched hurricane George disappear from the weather fax at the Port Captains office and set sail. We got about 100 miles offshore around Lisbon when we got hammered, later finding out that George had not quite dissapated as the forecast had suggested. A baptism of fire for the new owner, but i suggested that he was hardly ever going to be so unlucky again, and certainly improved his faith in his boat.
    I seem to have been hammered at some place or another on the way down that coast, spent way too long stuck behind the bar at Figura De Foz , watched cars being washed off the harbour wall at Peniche while at anchor, and a dodgy night at Sines. The grilled sardines and wine make up for it, and i have never tired of visiting and re-visiting when able.
    Did i see your boat up the Guadiana River or perhaps Gibraltar ? Been racking my brain, but somehow familiar. Anyhoo, like what you doing, and hope you heal up quick. Glad to see the man with the chainsaw still working, probably him building a trawler behind Peniche all those years back.

  9. #604
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks Skaraborgcraft! Are you talking of 1998-Georges? Happy you made it safely, and yes, this coast does get beaten from time to time. The power of the water and the wind, I really find it fascinating and love to watch it. Not necessarily from out at sea though, although I had my share of that in many occasions too.

    I've been in Gib several times since 1996, the last time in 2008. From April 2008 to April 2009 up and down the Rio Guadiana (furthest upriver I got was Penha d'Aguia, some 5 Miles before Mertola as I didn't feel like trying the rapids with 2.20 m draught and being stuck up there for 4 weeks). During this period I also spent quite some time in Vila Real de San Antonio to install my new furling gear etc. Would any of this match?
    Last edited by Dody; 10-19-2018 at 12:51 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  10. #605
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Lordy, i had to check, though my memory of he incident is quite crystal, its hard to believe that it was indeed 20 years ago! I was last in Gib around 2008, as i was diagnosed with cancer of the testicles, wrongly i might add, but did have repurcussions i wont go into here.I spent some time in Alcoutim up the river before heading back North to the UK, not a journey i completed, having run back south and spent a few months in Alvor sorting my head out after being almost run down/ hit by a freighter ship. I would have to check my logs, but i visited a friend who owned a place on the Spanish side up the Guadiana . Cant say for sure, but you know how some fragments stick in the mind, i put off commenting on your thread while i tried to find a connection. Was you around Ibiza or Estepona in 2008? I was getting around a bit back then, and my memory is not so hot.

    Edit: I might have been Jeanne, same year. I know the guy i was skippering for went back and got the met data for the time we was at sea. We didnt have anything other than a barometer on board.
    Last edited by skaraborgcraft; 10-19-2018 at 03:31 PM.

  11. #606
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Sorry to hear about your fall Dody. Some good time for planning and contemplation. Stay positive, you will get there. Funny thing, I was thinking just a couple of days ago while reading Gypies new deck thread, that we really need to be careful while working on our boats, particularly up on the hard. Any injury is going to delay progress and add expense. A fall from the deck can be very bad indeed. Lucky I guess you only fell down the companionway.

  12. #607
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Ah, this is good fun! Hey, just got a little scare, it's 10, not 20 years ago ! Gosh, what a story! Alcoutim, here we are? I was anchored on and off to the north of Alcoutim. In case you're British you might know Martin of Greybeard and Peter from Marlin? Peter's Marlin is this 20 m steel-ex-fishing-boat he fell in love with, which was built from wood originally and leaking badly. He got her out in Adra, welded a complete new skin around her and came back to Almerimar (which was my homebase for a long time) and broke all the interior wood out of her. However, Marlin is anchored as one of the last boats upriver before the bend, and I usually dropped my hook a couple of hundred meters upriver from this bend going to Alcoutim (and Sanlucar de Guadiana) with my dinghy. What nationality was your friend with the place up the Rio Guadiana on the Spanish Side? Upriver from Alcoutim there are not too many people living there. One of them is a Dutch couple more or less since the beginning of foreigners living there (when they were not off sailing), Ruud and Ulla, with, at the time, 3 smallish sailing-boats. Barbarella, aluminium, orange-coloured with sharks teeth, Poseidon, white with a bit of blue, the other one they kept in Holland. Directly at this bend was a British couple with kids, but we never really met. Further downriver on the Spanish side I don't know, but Ruud always had friends visiting around when they are there.

    If not Alcoutim, I left the med for good in April 2008 and headed nearly direct to Gib without playing around anywhere (1 night at anchor at Salobrena, fuelstop in Caleta de Velez). Further east was the years before. I've been to Alvor, but I never went with Tonga. 2009 Culatra, Portimao and then Porto Santo, Madeira, Azores. What was your boat and the name? Maybe I can dig something up? Wouldn't be the first time. Like with Ron on Montana I met here in 2010 and it turns out he actually was my neighbour the day I bought Tonga (29.09.1996) and a few days after that, we even found photos with the boats next to each other! Fritz of Pico I met going downriver while he was anchored in the bend at Pomerao (Rio Guadiana where the River leaves the Spanish border behind), turns out we were both in Tazzacorte/Canary Islands in March 1993 when the storm and surge hit and managed both to get out just before the harbour got destroyed by the waves and everything inside with it.
    Last edited by Dody; 10-19-2018 at 07:11 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  13. #608
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Sorry to hear about your fall Dody. Some good time for planning and contemplation. Stay positive, you will get there. Funny thing, I was thinking just a couple of days ago while reading Gypies new deck thread, that we really need to be careful while working on our boats, particularly up on the hard. Any injury is going to delay progress and add expense. A fall from the deck can be very bad indeed. Lucky I guess you only fell down the companionway.
    Thank you Phil, and yes, I totally agree, especially on the hard accidents can be pretty bad. Even worse so, as happened in Almerimar (Andalucia/Spain) several times that someone "borrowed" a ladder for a few minutes without saying anything, and the person on board noticed too late going down the ladder that it was actually missing. Or a slip and fall 4 m down onto the concrete floor coz you had to take your guardrail off and are balancing on some deckbeams only. Concerning the expenses here in Europe, at least where I am, is quite affordable. I'm a bit over 200 Euros a month including electricity and water. I know in OZ things are a bit very different. My best friend Myles is in Manley/Brisbane/QLD with his boat and pays a bit over 1.700 AUD - per month. On top of that he had to go through a huge process IF he could get a place there as he's a liveaboard. He doesn't mind, as it's close to his business and he would do anything to be able to live on his boat instead on shore. Different piece of kit, certainly.
    Worse is the delay of progress. In theory, in my case, it does not matter too much as there are no deadlines I've got to conform with. I enjoy what I'm doing and where I am. But no progress at all is very frustrating. They told me for the first 10 days to do absolutely nothing, the knee needs rest and time to heal. Fine with me, I got my books out and started reading and thinking and planning. But I still want my morning-coffee with the lads in the little harbour Bar, and I still want to have my dinner together with my mates in their workshop. So the fishermen brought me some crutches to move around without putting weight on my leg, and this is awesome!!! Last night, when I went up to the hospital to change the bandage I actually bought a pair of crutches (11.50 Euro each) up in the Pharmacy to keep. I've had it 3 times already that I was prisoner in my own boat because I had sprained an ankle or twisted a knee, incapable to move till it got better, and you can't buy these things at every corner. The other thing I've got to be super-careful about is, that the wound doesn't get infected as in this case it will take months to sort out. Well, things looked super-good yesterday, and I'm not that prone to infections, it just has to be alright! But I can't read for too long, because, on Sunday, my sis and her partner are coming to visit me for a week. I haven't seen them for 7 years and I'm super-happy to see them. Only shame is, a friend of mine (who's living close to here) offered they can live on his sailing-boat during their stay and I wanted to prepare the bed etc. for them, which I can't do now. Never mind, they are happy to help and it's alright !

    PS: the same day a bit earlier a friend of mine also slipped off the ladder of his fishingboat and hurt himself badly. There was some oil on the floor and the (wooden) ladder was wet from the rain. But compared with another accident the two of us are super-lucky: around 8 am the next morning a 12 m fishing boat got rolled by a huge wave a bit further north. They managed to rescue one person alive, one dead, 3 still missing and the boat sank in the incident.
    Last edited by Dody; 10-19-2018 at 06:33 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
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  14. #609
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Glad to see the man with the chainsaw still working, probably him building a trawler behind Peniche all those years back.
    I bet it was him, if not his dad who's in his 70's now and still helping out from time to time. They've always had their workshop in Peniche and are living there.

    Just in case you should have any photos of the build, please, please let me know! Albertino would be super-happy to have a copy!
    Last edited by Dody; 10-19-2018 at 06:36 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  15. #610
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Hello Dody:
    Well, I get busy with things for a couple days and you've fallen into a hatch and hurt yourself! Yikes! Hope the healing is underway, I notice its (the healing) not so quick as it once was... full arms, wet shoes (or feet) or ladder and all of a sudden, ouch. Hope the days of quiet can be well spent, looks like your conversation with skara above is a great way to spend the time well, finding out how your travels might have intersected a few (10 is a few, just for reference) years ago. Nothing of value to offer, except the observation (not original) that big projects take big perseverance and the resolve to keep going, step by slow step...
    Be well, heal quickly.

  16. #611
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    This internet thing and digital photography is a move i have been quite happy with, but on that particular trip, i was still using a 35mm camera, and my budget was tight enough that i rarely shot off a roll. What photos i had went into storage and i was told they got damp and thrown out......so having to rely on a fractured memory, which is not ideal.
    Chris and Marsha were living in a place just South of Alcoutim, they had a 30ft lugger " Villona-may" (sp) , the place they stayed at was owned by a guy called Christian, they had a couple of wee kids. When we were there, there was a guy called Nick who had an ex MOD harbour towing launch, 60ft called "ice cap", he was previously in Sheppards Marina in Gib.
    We spent 2 months in Portimao, in and around what was then the new-ish marina. The boat is/was still around down there , a Hartley Tasman/Tahitian 27, ferro cement, black hull, cream decks, short telegraph pole mast which i called "Runestone". The guy i sold her to died not long after, but she had been spotted again in Alvor-Faro and on the Guadiana.There was a couple, David and Jackie on a Red Nicholson 38 "Mary Kate", they seemed to have known and met everyone, but they had been out there for 12 years already, i see their old boat for sale on Ebay recently,in Greece, so they must have swallowed the anchor, or finally emptied that bilge of wine bottles!
    Glad to hear the knee healing, but dont push it too hard.

  17. #612
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    Thanks Brian, never a dull moment 😊! Healing seems good and I'll keep it like this - I hope!!! And in a way it's nice to do something different for a few days. Also, tomorrow my little sis Katrin is coming for a visit. We haven't seen each other (nor her partner who's an old friend of mine) for 7 years, so that's quite something!

    Skaraborgcraft I agree, it's nice with digital photography and Internet but ... I tried to dig into my 2008 photos today and something has messed them up completely. I've saved them all to 2 external harddiscs for safety, which of course I can't find at the moment. I know I will find them and all will be fine, but it takes time which I possibly won't find the coming week as my little sis and her partner are here from tomorrow morning. I'll be back on track!!!

    Sent from my SM-G900FD using Tapatalk
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  18. #613
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Dody,

    Please tell us that your knee has healed well.

    Dave.

  19. #614
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks for asking Dave, one more week of being super-extra careful and I can start walking and slowly leave the crutches away. At least that's what I got told yesterday

    I've been writing sheets and sheets of paper to give you a little update, but all landed in the bin again ...

    The thing is, as this was just a small emergency station where I drove to, they didn't have any equipment to do further checks. Under normal circumstances the family-doctor would then take over and arrange anything else he thinks important. Now ... I'm not registered with the local health-system, so I haven't got a family-doctor. Bandages and pulling the stitches was done in the same emergency station, and this part seemed to be healing fine but my knee wouldn't bend, it kept being swollen and it hurt. So I went to a private general-doctor to have a look at it (the orthopaedist here only comes Friday afternoon every second week), but he couldn't see anything wrong. Off to the physiotherapist to see if he can do something about it. He gave it a few tries and then told me something inside the knee is wrong and I should get an echography done, so back to the same doctor to get a prescription and arrange an appointment in Leiria for a week later (earliest I could get in the area here). Meanwhile my mates here in the port told me to have a "Resonancia" done as this shows everything - it's some Magnetic whatever.

    The echography showed a partly ruptured tendon (the one that connects 4 different upper leg muscles to the kneecap), some inflammation and whatever. Back to the doctor to get a prescription for "Resonancia" and make an appointment - earliest possible the 19th of December. Waiting-time I went on with physiotherapy 3 times a week till yesterday I finally had my appointment with the Orthopedist. He took a long time time to give everything a very decent check and told me that the tendon has started healing and there is no need to go for an operation - which is great!

    Then I was asked to explain how exactly the accident went. In his opinion it is not possible to damage the meniscus in this way and I wouldn't be able to walk if the bones were damaged, so I should cancel my appointment for the "Resonancia".
    He prescribed some medicine, I'm to put ice on the knee 3 times a day, be super-extra careful for the next 6 days, do certain exercises, and slowly start walking. He reckons I'll be much much better by x-mas and probably fairly good in 4 weeks time when he wants to see me again.

    I'm not sure yet about cancelling the "Resonancia", I think I better wait a few more days. Cancelling is easy and there'll always be someone to take this place, but getting a new appointment takes ages.

    So, finger x-ed!!!!
    Last edited by Dody; 12-08-2018 at 09:38 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  20. #615
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    I've been thinking long and hard and have decided I'll have the "Resonancia" or Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) done instead of cancelling my appointment, even if my knee should improve - which it hasn't really yet in the 4 days since my visit to the Orthopedist.

    There was a bit of a wakeup-call about 2 weeks ago. Let me explain:

    My sister and her partner had been visiting me the last week in Octobe



    WhatsApp Image 2018-10-23 at 18.23.57.jpg

    We had a great time together and they were staying on the boat of Victor, a friend of mine

    20181006_113741.jpg

    A few weeks previously Victor had been coming back from his summer-trip to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde Islands, Azores and back to here, singlehanded as always. Somewhere he got caught in a fishing structure with a big sea running. More than 24 hours later he managed to free himself and sail on. Coming back one of his priorities was to get the boat out of the water to find out about the damage, but there was no space on the yard. Finally another boat went back in the water so there was space for him. And of course I offered to give him a hand which he happily accepted, none of us having the slightest thought about my knee.

    Casting off went OKish, with a properly working leg it would for sure have been much easier ...

    The moment we had passed the fish-quay the engine died down. Victor headed towards the fuelstation (docking to starbord) with the remaining speed, but fenders and lines to port and with my damned leg no way to rig a quick emergency solution. But we were a bit too far off anyway.

    He turned around pointing south with the last speed we had in the boat. There was absolutely no wind before, but now a few little gusts pick up from the south. Right, if we would manage to turn the nose a tiny bit to the east, these gusts could push us towards the fuelstation. No, Victor has turned the helm the other way.

    Maybe 25 m distance to the rocks behind us and the boat is starting to drift in this direction.

    F...K!

    What are the options now?

    In preparation for the boatyard Victor had taken all the sails off the boat. Alright, drop the hook then in the hope it will hold first try and keep us away from the rocks till we've sorted the problem with the engine.

    We're not a team, not used to work together. While all this is going through my head, Victor is down below talking with someone on the phone or the radio.

    I'm at the bow now, figuring out how to drop the anchor, if and how it's secured and if the chain is properly attached to it when I notice a fishing-boat on the move.

    International distress signal with my arms, he's changing course and heading towards us. Less than 15 m to the rocks behind us. It's Philippe. I ask him if he could give us a tow, the engine died down? Sure, no problem!

    10 m to the rocks. I hand him a line, he attaches it to his boat, 7 m distance, he revs his engine and slowly we start moving away from the rocks. Where do we want him to take us? To the dock of the travellift if it's not too much trouble for you. Sure, no problem.

    Of course the little floating pontoon in front of the lift-dock was full of boats which don't belong there and we couldn't prevent touching one of them, luckily without scratches.

    Some time later we had actually made it into the slings of the travellift, no fenders in the the way, slings in the proper places, for a change our cranedriver doing a nice and soft job in lifting her out of the water. Then moving her forwards so we can step off the bow.

    No way!!! I'm not capable to lift my leg over the pulpit to step over to shore.

    Nothing we can do about it, even though for safety reasons nobody is allowed to stay on board, I can't get off the boat. Holy s..t!!!

    So, we went on with me on the deck and I had some nice views.

    20181115_102100.jpg

    Some time later the boat was in her proper position, the supports in place and things safe enough to attach a ladder so I could get off. And this is the damage we found:

    IMG_9415.jpg

    and some scratches on the prop. Sorry by the way about the pic laying on the side, I haven't figured out yet how to get this sorted.

    However. It was certainly stupid of us to completely forget about my leg-injury, but to be honest, we didn't have the slightest idea about it being such a problem. As I'm a liveaboard and will be for the rest of my life I better get that sorted properly because as it is it's a big nuisance and makes life pretty complicated.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Dody; 12-29-2018 at 12:24 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  21. #616
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    When I had an MRI of my knee a few years ago I was asked numerous times about any chance of metal in my body. It turns out there have been some legendary occurrences written up in medical journals over time. Several levels of questions later I was in the machine when they stopped and came it. Was I sure ,was my leg hot etc etc. Turned out that I had specks of black sand in there from an accident I had when I was 11, it presented on the machine in a similar way to a shotgun wound.
    So that's my funny MRI story.
    Hope it works for you Dody, and they don't find anything difficult.

  22. #617
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Sorry by the way about the pic laying on the side, I haven't figured out yet how to get this sorted.
    If you open an image with Windows Photo Viewer and rotate it, photo viewer will save the new orientation automatically to the file (without asking).

    Take care of that knee.

  23. #618
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Does Mr Max live on the boat? I'm asking because I have a cat and I'd like to spend a few years cruising. I'm wondering how cats take to the cruising lifestyle.

  24. #619
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Great story John, and I guess you're quite lucky that these specks of sand never caused any irritations!

    And thanks!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  25. #620
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    If you open an image with Windows Photo Viewer and rotate it, photo viewer will save the new orientation automatically to the file (without asking).

    Take care of that knee.
    Oh, I guess I've got to play with that a bit. I'm using Ubuntu on this computer at the moment and the pictures were kind of selforientating without me doing anything about it.

    And thanks Dave!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  26. #621
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Quote Originally Posted by chollapete View Post
    Does Mr Max live on the boat? I'm asking because I have a cat and I'd like to spend a few years cruising. I'm wondering how cats take to the cruising lifestyle.
    Yes, he lives on the boat and Tonga is his "safe place" or the place where he's hiding if there is anything that scares him. He manages even the 4 m aluminium-ladder up and down and seems pretty happy.

    I had cats all my life, but the last one had died just before I moved aboard in 2002. My idea has always been that they need a certain amount of freedom I can't provide for them when I'm living on a boat, so I never made an effort again. Then, it was October 2015, this tiny little kitten turned up. For 3 days he was all around me, maximum distance 1 m away from me. I tried to stay tough and talk him out of it, tried to convince him to find himself a better home, but he wouldn't listen. Fourth day in the evening. I was on my way up the ladder to go to bed, it was raining. He was sitting on my masts, wet to the bones and looking at me. No, I thought, you deserve better. Got down the ladder again. took him in my arms, carried him up and within seconds he was on top of my bed purring like a huge Tiger .

    He has adapted really good and he's a joy in my life. Even wakes me up when the wind changes or something else is different and he thinks I should know about it (or wants to ask me if it's alright?). We haven't been out at sea together yet as Tonga was already on the boatyard when he turned up but I've got quite some friends with cats on their boats and they are all doing fine once they get used to it.

    Edit: change of scenery doesn't seem to be a problem for cats. All the cats I had before I took with me whenever I went out for a weekend to go fishing or windsurfing or meeting up with friends somewhere or whatever, none of them ran away and seemed to be happy about me not leaving them behind (when I did leave them behind they wouldn't talk with me for a while afterwards). Same with Mr. Max. In 2016 the 2 of us went for a holiday on the Algarve to see my parents. I had rented a place where domestic animals are welcome. We had a tiny little house, the place was a huge garden with a little fence around. When we arrived I told him this will be our home for the next 14 days, and he was always there when I came back in the evening waiting for me, no problem at all.
    Last edited by Dody; 12-13-2018 at 05:39 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  27. #622
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    I would have loved to give you a happy little update, but I still haven't got any news. Doing the MRI there was only the technician who wouldn't give an opinion and the results, well, I can pick them up after 8 working days. With x-mas and new year this means no news before January.

    Guess I'm getting used to waiting!

    Never mind. The weather is quite nice, some lovely sunshine so I went for tiny little walks (yes, I know, I shouldn't, but I can't resist), everybody around in holiday-mood, some friends might drop by and then there is the Sydney-Hobart starting on Boxing-Day, awesome!

    Wish you all a super-happy x-mas and a great start into the new yea

    Sent from my SM-G900FD using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Dody; 12-21-2018 at 08:46 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  28. #623
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Ping... how are things in Nazare Dody? I hope your leg is healing well!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  29. #624
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Hi Chris and thanks for asking! They (Doc and Physiotherapist) say it's healing nicely - but far too slow for my taste. The first big breakthrough came after x-mas when I bought myself a pair of pretty expensive, lightweight walking-shoes for rough terrain which gave me a huge amount of support. Within no time I could leave the crutches away and start walking upright properly. Bending of the knee is still restricted. Getting better though with the Physiotherapy as I noticed I've started using both legs for getting up and down my ladder. I was meant to start slowly with the stationary bicycle at the Physiotherapists, which I did 3 times after the last treatments, but it's too boring. So yesterday I fixed my bicycle and went for a spin to the market, dirtroad but flat terrain. I know they'll get mad about me, that I could fall and rip off the tendon as all this is not stable enough they say. It was a lovely spring day yesterday with heaps of sunshine, I went very careful, and really enjoyed.

    I haven't gone back to boatwork yet, as I still feel too restricted in my movements and I know I will get carried away if I do.









    Last edited by Dody; 01-26-2019 at 11:19 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  30. #625
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Glad to hear you are mending! And bicycling through that scenery sure seems like a nice way to get your exercise. We still have a few more weeks of cold and wet to slog through here so I'm envious of those shot of flowers in the sun.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #626
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    How's it going?

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  32. #627
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    And how's the kitty?!

  33. #628
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    Thanks for asking Phil and Chollapete!

    Slow, tediously slow, still not back to boatwork and I'm getting restless! I used some of the time to do a little sortout in my workshop, it had been getting out of hand there a little too much. Doing this I stumbled across some wool I had bought a few years ago for making socks, but which turned out to be too thick. I had been moving it from one corner to the next and now I had it in my hands again. No, this has to go, I've got enough now! What could I do with this wool????? It came to me that all my life I wanted to have one of these Icelandic sweaters. I found a pattern on internet, slightly modified it and picked up knitting again. Somehow I still managed after all these years, and the day before yesterday - after 1.5 weeks of knitting - it was done. Last stages looked like this:

    1-IMG_9463.jpg

    1-IMG_9464.jpg

    As it is 100 % pure wool, the instructions say one is meant to wash it by hand, lay it out flat to dry and pull into the correct shape. I haven't got a clothes-dryer, so I came up with this solution:

    1-IMG_9468.jpg

    1-IMG_9469.jpg

    Still isn't dry and I guess the rain today doesn't really help, but it seem to be working.

    Mr. Max is super-happy to really have me around at the moment and is big smiles all over. We've got a gang of 3 youngish cats in the area who some nights seem to come up on the boat. He's ok with them, and they wouldn't try to come inside. But, there is a big black-and-white Tomcat, nearly double his size, who was beating him up a few times and would love to stay inside with us. For the moment it seems we've got him under control, but who know what happens with next full-moon?
    Dogs are sometimes a bit of a headache for me. The local ones are ok, they all know and mainly respect each other (unless Max is getting his jealous streak again and wants to go against them), and Max knows their moods fairly well by now. The more difficult bit is the foreign dogs. Dogs from Visitors, Tourists, other Boatpeople, who know nothing of the little rules the local animals have worked out with each other. Many of them behave as if they own the place and respect no boundaries. Funny enough I noticed Max heading for the ladder the moment he hears someone whistle for the second time - a clear sign there is a foreign dog out of control by the owner out there. And I also noticed he gives a dash for the ladder when he can see a person with a lead hanging around his neck.

    And yes, we did have some very rough seas recently. Beginning of February we had a forecast for over 8 m (which can get 3 times the size on the North-Beach, and more), but with the strong winds the sea was far too wild and completely out of control for the big-wave guys.

    1-IMG_9447.jpg
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  34. #629
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    Default Re: Wood - Plywood - Epoxy bond, re-building my ketch Tonga

    And a few more - although you always take the picture at the wrong moment ....

    1-IMG_9453.jpg

    1-IMG_9446.jpg

    A friend has asked me to make a copy of his sprayhood. No idea if I will manage, but fortunately he's happy with whatever might come out of it - well, that's what he says ... It would still not be progress on Tonga, but it's something I would be able to do without bending or overbending my knee and without the risk of getting trapped by accident in a corner without being able to get out unhurt. So, I guess I should give this a try. He gave me his old sprayhood, the material is all there. Only, I'm scared to end up with a wobbly, flappy, ugly thing. They really don't look good in my opinion when not properly tight over the supporting frame - which is something I'm not sure I will manage by just copying what is there instead of making a template (the boat is in Barcelona, which is on the other side of the Iberian Peninsula). I had asked him to make a huge amount of photos before taking it off, which he did - but at a stage where he had loosened it all up already - to encourage me not to worry about any wobbly flabby ugly stuff. Doesn't really help, does it? We'll see. I might put up some pics when I start, ideas are more than welcome!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  35. #630
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    You must have been planning on making a lot of socks!That's a great looking jumper. I've taken the plunge and been doing some work on my own decks.

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

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