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Thread: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

  1. #1051
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    That's true, flats with different angles for each of the 3 (4) bolts. Still, it would be nice if I could manage to do it in the shape of the washer instead of cutting out a square piece.

    It's on the bench and I've tried with chisels on the lowest of the holes, the one were the angle for me is the easiest to achieve, and it didn't go too bad. Not perfect but not bad. Just to give it a try I started with the second one. Free-hand I found it difficult to get the correct angle started and the same will be happening with the next one. I'll give it a bit more of a thinking-session tonight. Right now I think having some kind of a guide/straight-edge in miniature-format attached to the side would be something that will help me tremendously - but, the night is just starting and I might wake up with a better solution :-D!
    If you do not have a round gouge in your kit, use a smaller chisel and cut the pocket 8 sided (actually5 ) as if you were rounding a spar. You can check for squareness as you go by putting the nut on a short dowel or bolt that will slip into the hole as you pare the pocket down. You could even superglue a washer to the nut on your dowel for the correct diameter flat.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #1052
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I can't abide the bilge, so I would rather drop this article here.

    https://www.cruisingworld.com/story/...pacting-plans/
    "Sailing Totem: How Coronavirus is impacting our plans
    The spread of COVID-19 is having a major impact on cruising sailors’ plans."
    The single best resource for cruisers is Noonsite. They’ve set up a page which aggregates information for cruisers by region, then by country, with the latest information about port clearances and quarantine. It’s an incredible effort by the editors made possible through active updates by cruisers; if you have news, send to editor@noonsite.com, subject COVID-19, with the update and source.
    Last edited by MN Dave; 03-30-2020 at 11:41 PM.

  3. #1053
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Hi all,

    I thought it's time to give a little sign of life. Everything is ok here in my little corner, I'm surviving quite well although the situation with Lockdown and all felt very strange. As I'm officially registered in the Porto da Nazaré I'm super-lucky and can move freely in the whole port-area, even walk on the beach belonging to the port, which is wonderful compared to everyone living in an apartment in a city. The social distancing was quite difficult as I could hear and see my mates starting their engines, unloading their catch, working on their boats and and and but we were all kind of isolated at the same time and stayed far apart from each other. The little cafe and minimercado here in the port stayed operational and had a plexiglas-window installed to hand out coffee etc. in tiny plastic cups, us standing outside keeping our distance, the fishermen from Nazaré trying to stay far apart from the Spanish fishermen from the big Trawlers or the fishermen from the North like Vila do Conde and Povoa de Varzim as there are still no cases in Nazaré. It didn't feel good so I started to brew my own coffee and stay away from it all. I never had a problem being on my own, never missed anything - be it at anchor for months on the Rio Guadiana without seeing a soul or be it out at sea. But this was different.

    While people were dying and suffering everywhere something else happend that looks like a luxury-problem on first view but shook my whole existence to the bones. I am a liveboard-sailor which means my boat is my only home and I am at home where my boat is. I took some very basic things for granted. Things like the possibility to ask for help in a real emergency, to find shelter if desperately needed, or to stock up with some diesel, water and provisons after months at sea. In their fear of the virus authorities all over the world reacted to (understandably) protect their citizens and the law of the sea got wiped out. Suddenly there was no answer for help any more, shelter got denied or supplies. People got told "go back to your country!" - well, I haven’t got one, like many others, glad this didn't happen to me! I've meanwhile made my peace with it and will simply prepare myself even better, but I found it a bit difficult to cope with this fact.

    The supermarkets were open and well stocked, but nothing else could be had so I had to sit down and wait. I kept up the contact with the cruising-community, tried to help where I could and started something I had on my mind for a long long time: find a new home for my Sailing Portuguese Waters Article. For ages I found it really silly to keep up hosting and whatnot for a single article to help cruising-sailors not to get into trouble on the Portuguese west-coast. I never wanted to have a Blog in the typical sense. Then the idea came to me to do something like a story-teller in the old days, something where I don't have any obligation to write in regular intervals but when I like it or feel like it instead. So, I started to set up a website for Tonga, Mr. Max and me, telling stories, true stories. About things that went on during our travels by land and by sea. There will also be a technical section one day. Just in case someone would like to have a look how far I got about these 18 years out, you can find it here: https://tongabonds.com/blog/ - happy reading! And yes, of course, I was sewing masks for my mates. At the pharmacy they were selling disposable masks in a packet of 50 for a bit under 50 Euros. Well, of course, no-one here is capable to pay 50 Euros just like this, so something had to be done.

    Meanwhile things are easing up here, shops start to open again and I slowly found my joy working on Tonga back, working with my lovely chisels, the planes, the circular saw. I wanted to surprise you all with a photo of the knees in the corner and the one in the stern installed but the last 3 days everything kept going the wrong way, being topped this morning by my scaffolding suddenly feeling wobbly when I went up to start in the morning - because the weld on one of the uprights had rusted through. I still had a rescued old upright sitting in the corner, replaced it only to find out that the long drillbit I had was 6.5 mm and not the 5.5 mm I needed. In the end another day was gone and still none of the corner-pieces installed. Well, fingers crossed, it'll all be going smoothly tomorrow and finally some progress to show !!!
    Last edited by Dody; 05-28-2020 at 05:13 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  4. #1054
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thanks for the update Dody. I was wondering how you were doing. Good to hear that you are getting by ok. And I'm now following your blog. Great stories! Thanks for sharing them.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  5. #1055
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Chris !
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  6. #1056
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    Default

    Glad things are OK

    Sent from my CPH1851 using Tapatalk

  7. #1057
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Phil, and I really hope everyone else here is ok too!!!

    I keep getting interrupted and things proceed with chewing-gum-speed. The starboard-side corner-piece is in place now, bedded and attached with lagscrews towards the outside of the hull and I got the first long hole - through the stern-frame, the corner-piece and the next deckbeam - done today. It's plus/minus 350 mm long and for a change I managed exactly where and how I wanted it to be. Did it with a (long) masonry drill(twistbit), the only drill I could get my hands on which was long enough. He didn't like the hardwood at all so it was drilling for a few seconds, get it out, clean it, let it cool off and again for a few seconds but it's done and I'm really happy about it! Now one more long hole on this side and then the portside. But again: interruption. Little Liza (the cat I rescued, our new crewmember) has a date at the vet tomorrow for sterilization and with taking her there and later collecting her the day won't leave much space. As much as I adore tiny kittens, we don't have the conditions at all to raise them.

    However, in my excitement about soon really being able to start closing the stern I have ordered (and paid) 10 of the remaining 70 sheets of my Okume plywood which is patiently waiting for me in the shop and should arrive this or next week, something that feels really motivating. And I contacted the company where I get my Epoxy etc. from to find out about a delivery of G-Flex to glue the Okume on the planks of the stern (which I still have to install once the knees are finished installing). Funny enough he told me I can use normal Epoxy with 403 to thicken it as the stern is flat. Still, the planks I'm installing will love to move a bit in their lifetime, so I'll think about this a bit more I guess.

    But, tomorrow Liza & I hope all goes well!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  8. #1058
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    Default

    Great progress! Acres of ply! My project has come to a screaming halt for a while. I tore 3 tendons in my right shoulder. Much painful, or maybe I'm just a sooky sooky la-la. It's been a couple of months now with no real improvement so it looks like surgery is the next step, which apparently is not a lot of fun. Extremely frustrating! Although with some help from Bruce Moffatt who also visits here occasionally I refitted the anchor windlass and finished bolting down the pulpit this week. The to do list is significant but not overwhelming.

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  9. #1059
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Oh no, I'm sorry to hear that Phil! Tendons (and muscles) seem to be something that takes ages to to heal, I never expected to be knocked out for so long with my leg with this misery. Hope you're getting better soon and x my fingers for you!!!

    Nice that you're ready to drill holes in your new deck again and well done on your stanchions and the windlass! It's a bit difficult to read your list, but what do you mean with re-building the cockpit?

    I've installed both corner-pieces now but no pictures before a decent cleanup and the white paintjob done. Somehow I seem to be slowly getting better with long straight holes. Not sure if one can call a 350 mm hole long, but for me this is quite long. However, this time I managed all 4 of them to exit within half a Millimeter to where I wanted them to be and call this a little victory for me !

    Got little Liza back from the vet today and she's already playing Mrs. Speedy Gonzales, wearing a blue coat instead of the collar they used to get so they don't open the stitches of the surgery. And yes, of course, she already wiggled out of her coat once and I had to crawl through the whole boat to find the coat back!

    Well, and I got carried away with something ... Lidl, one of the supermarket-chains, were selling a Standup Paddleboard. Friends of mine from Jersey with their boat in the Marina, who had spent their time with me here during the lockdown, wanted to buy one of them, so off we went. Back in the Port got it out, inflated and started to play around with it. It was giving us so much fun, I had trouble to resist. Well, the water here is pretty cold. I won't buy anything unless I've got a wetsuit. They also wanted some gear so off we went to Decathlon (a sportshop-chain) in Leiria. They had one board I just couldn't keep my hands off and 640 Euros later with heaps of gear including paddle, pump, wetsuit, backpack for my vhf and water etc. a drybag and whatnot we left the shop. Tried it out the next day, yes, it's awesome and fun big time with the 2 boards. Lino from Nazaré Waterfun offered to give us a 3rd one so we can go distance, but they are off to Jersey tomorrow and won't be back before September. However, I want to do a few more trials inside the port and then carefully stick the nose out a bit in front of the breakwater to see how that feels, can't wait and happy it's the weekend now
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  10. #1060
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    Default

    Stand up boards are god fun. JB has a couple on Riada. My cockpit well is there, and the seats are part of the deck. But the coamings sat on top of the deck, between the wheelhouse and aft cabin. So I have to rebuild the coamings.

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  11. #1061
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Ah, I see, cool, a different way of doing this Phil, interesting, thank you! This has been done different on Tonga as the coaming is not sitting on top of the deck as kind of an "addition" after the deck is done but more like an integral part. The outer side of the cockpit is attached to the carlin and continues upwards about 12 or so centimeters above deck-level and the outer side of the coaming is build up connecting to it.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  12. #1062
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Finally something is happening.

    Here the not-so-nice upright of the treasle. I replaced it with another old one I still had laying around

    IMG_0590.jpg

    IMG_0591.jpg

    Now the knees. What might look like a big gap in the photos is actually my black bedding-compound.

    IMG_0592.jpg

    IMG_0603.jpg

    That's the starboard-side quarter-knee. Bolted lengthwise and with lag-screws from the outside, the portside quarter-knee is nearly identical.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  13. #1063
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    And now the real one, the central knee :-D!

    IMG_0600.jpg

    IMG_0601.jpg

    IMG_0602.jpg

    IMG_0604.jpg

    IMG_0605.jpg

    I have to re-tighten the nuts in a day or so (as soon as my back is better) and then install the filling-piece to match the angle of the stern aft.

    After "counterboring" the topside of the knee to take the washers properly - thank you Nick by the way, this was really doable and easy with the chisels!!! - I had given it another coat of Epoxy. Which of course ran a bit down the sides. I sanded this before installing it, because the filling piece will be Epoxy-filler-glued in place so there will be a bit more of a mess meaning I will give the sides another coat later.
    Last edited by Dody; 06-15-2020 at 12:07 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  14. #1064
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Progress! Good to see that in. Always worth checking any scaffold for defects especially that used in a coastal enviroment, i have seen the consequences and it aint pretty......

    I note your planking is below the transom frame (fashion piece?) did you remove a filler timber? How is that dealt with, i assume before final planking?

  15. #1065
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Hm, not sure if I understand what you mean Ian and, even worse, I haven't got the proper terminology. Am I guessing right that you are talking about the planking going pointy at the after-edge below, and the transom-frame only being rounded? If this is what you're talking about: I don't know yet. I'll see how the shape turns out when the planking on the portside is completed (hopefully with the help of Albertino, the shipwright) and probably shape something that will serve as a base for the double-diagonal plywood that will go over the whole lot. Actually, I'll have to guess and do that before, because the planking aft on the stern should have the same shape.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  16. #1066
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    ^ Right......unless of course you will sink those nail heads and plane the planks flush, but i was thinking they are the original planks, and you may have trimmed the transom frame in the mean time, or perhaps that gap has always been there, hidden behind the transom covering?



    I notice the plank above the red lead is already flush with the transom frame, i was wondering what the score was for the lower planks......

  17. #1067
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Ha, yes, lucky me, we are talking about the same thing!

    It's like this: the whole stern-section is new and the planking not complete yet. The picture you are referring to is taken from underneath. What looks like "above" is actually the starboard-side of the boat, and "below" is the portside. The starboard-side planking was already sanded to shape, but not the portside as there are still planks missing. Once they are in place the whole lot gets sanded in the same fashion as the starboard-side.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  18. #1068
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    ^ Thanks, i didnt go back and check out what was original and what had been replaced, i just noticed the extra depth on some of the planking.That makes sense now. Its all good, carry on!

  19. #1069
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Meanwhile ... I have Epoxy-Filler-Glued the filler-piece in place (this is before cleanup)

    IMG_0610.jpg

    but I seem to have developed a great talent in producing obstacles which weren't there before. I had re-tightened all the nuts to make sure they'll never come apart on their own, and when I wanted to start the cleanup I noticed that the shape of the stringers was showing on the fashion-piece

    IMG_0614.jpg

    But this is not all. When I checked with a straight-edge I found out that with tightening hard I had actually pulled the lower part of the upper bar slightly towards the inside of the boat.

    IMG_0611.jpg

    I've sanded the stringers level with the outside again, and I guess I'll have to modify the shape of the upper part of the fashion-piece because I don't want to produce a dip in the center of the stern

    IMG_0616.jpg

    I didn't really need this!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  20. #1070
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Glue on some shims in the low spots and sand everything with a longboard. Or glue the shims later directly on one of the transom layers and sand the whole thing to shape.

  21. #1071
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Rumars!

    I was so frustrated that I didn't have a proper look when I packed up, but I think it's only the top corner and I was wondering if I could solve the problem in planing this down a bit. I'll do some standup-paddling with my board this weekend to get my head free and have a proper look later. Stuck my nose out between the pierheads today, the first time on "my own keel" since I came in in 2009 after hurricane Bill changed my plans and it feels sooooo good!! Won't really leave the port with it yet as I need to earn some more confidence like quick turns and stuff, promised!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  22. #1072
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I hope the stand-up-paddling was good. You need to check the fashion piece with a batten in all directions before deciding. It could well be that the fashion piece was only roughly shaped in because the shipwright expected to do the final fairing when he installed the transom. Is your transom curved in two directions or only one?

  23. #1073
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thanks, yes, it was great although feeling muscles now I didn't know I had :-D!

    The transom is simply flat, nothing fancy about it. Just had another look. The top traverse is slightly pulled in with the deepest bit at the center (maybe 2 mm) and twisted, which is also worst at the center. Coming in from the sides the first 10 cm on portside are ok, starboard it starts within the first centimeters.
    Going across coming from below the outer face of the fashion piece is correct. The filler-piece of course doesn't have the correct angle which means at the deepest spot it's between 4 and 5 mm.

    I think shims might be the best way to go instead of sorting this out later with filler or stuff. I remember that I had overlooked some irregularity with one of the deckbeams further forward which resulted in a dip. I sorted it with fibreglass and Epoxy before the next sheet on top went in but it would have been far less work to do it right in the beginning.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  24. #1074
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Glue them on then sand with a longboard if you want perfection.

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