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Thread: wooden boat hardwoods

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    London UK
    Posts
    46

    Default wooden boat hardwoods

    i have a forest in Missouri, its been thinned before the 1st WW, its a mix of alder, ash, oak and black rock maple. Some the wood was used by Steinway for their pianos. its about 85 acres. I wouldn't want it logged commercially but is there a market for a few trees (circa 200) and if so how might one go about it?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Conway, MA
    Posts
    5,833

    Default Re: wooden boat hardwoods

    In that list I don't see much structural timber for boats. If oak is of the white oak types that is the exception. I think you need to talk to a forester in the area or a sawmill operator if there are any left. Finding someone knowledgeable and compatible with your idea of proper methods of logging will be key. You might be lucky but you might have to search. There are portable sawmill operators all over the country. I have near neighbors with portable mills. One of them has spent much time in the last year or two in Kentucky milling oak, commuting from Massachusetts. If there is a specialty lumber/hardwood dealer in the area, that is another contact to approach. Proper handling of interesting timber is time consuming and long term, not common in these times and this country. Your location is listed as London, UK. The exact nature (size and configuration) of the trees to be cut would be most interesting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    65,134

    Default Re: wooden boat hardwoods

    I can't think of anything useful offhand... except that every county in the U.S. has what's called an 'Extension Service'. Around here, they can help small woodlot owners in a variety of ways - from choosing species to plant to management/harvesting plans to finding markets. You might contact the folks in your county...
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    14,303

    Default Re: wooden boat hardwoods

    I should think that you would need a rep. to manage your forest for you. Advertising it in Woodenboat Magazine would be a choice for marketing the wood. Your wood is desirable and should be used for top priority projects such as historic re-builds or projects by universities and schools. It should not be wasted! White oak is normally used green in order to steam bend the ribs of a wooden boat. If your oak is such or is live oak it is also at a premium for wooden boat construction as well and it can also provide premium caulking mallet material! If used for keels or other backbone components a builder would get that wood out first and allow it to season a bit while getting set up for the construction. Some builders will lay in the oak even before constructing a building site in order to give it the greatest amount time for seasoning. The root and branch crooks are also extremely desirable for boat knees and other curved components. I would urge anyone seeking your oak to fell it during winter solstice in order to in sure that the sap is down as much as possible. Normally such wood is picked by a builder and taken down by most of them. The ash has use as well and is most often used for mast spreaders and sailing battens. Alader is low in rot resitance as well as soft. It does have a close grain and is more suited for carvings and furniature building than boat construction. Being easy to work it makes it of value for that purpose of use.
    I wish you well with the extended usage of your premium wood.
    Jay

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Southwest Iowa, USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: wooden boat hardwoods

    A word of caution - some of the local loggers working on groves of black walnut here in Iowa have been known to help themselves to many extra trees in excess of what the property owner authorized and was paid for. I know one landowner who caught them at it, held them up at gunpoint, and emptied their wallets for compensation.

    I don't really recommend that route, but once the tree is cut and they're gone, it's hard to prove what was and wasn't marked for cutting.

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