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Thread: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Southern Maryland
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    2

    Default Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    Hello Forum Members. New guy here who recently picked up the design plans for the SSS20 and have a question about the angles on the Floors and how others have made the cuts. My conundrum is this, if there is a 6 degree aft angle that is applied to the end of stringer 11, how is that 6 degrees achieved? The angle on the stinger end is 62 degrees, but you can't set your table saw blade to 6 degrees and cut along that 62 degree cut line as this would create an angle on the top of the stringer that is greater than 6 degrees. This goes back to my days of grinding compound angles on lathe tooling.To maintain a 6 degree angle at the top of the stringer, the blade would have to be set at something less than 6 degrees. I hope that makes sense.

    Just looking for input on how others achieved a 6 degree angle oriented to the top of the stringer as opposed to the face of the stringer?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Deer Isle, Maine
    Posts
    1,214

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    First, welcome to WBF. Pictures are paramount!
    There are many here who have built SSS. They will be along.
    To me, your question seems to conflate 'floors' with 'stringers'.
    They are two different members.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    Sorry about the terminology switch mid-post...lol. I am referring to the floors, the floorboards/decking mounts directly to the floors, so no stringers.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Deer Isle, Maine
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    1,214

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    No worries.
    Try looking at this, might help...
    http://www.timelessboatworks.com/con...immonsseaskiff

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Nokesville, VA, USA
    Posts
    42

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    I'm sure there's a way to do this by machine, but I think I'd have to see a picture to figure out how. But in general, it's often faster to scribe some lines and cut these funny angles with a hand plane. If you haven't built a boat before, freehanding with a plane can seem a bit daunting, but you'll get the hang of it quickly. It's hard to mess up to badly with a hand plane.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tuckahoe
    Posts
    7,534

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    A screenshot of the plans of the station in question would help, but, generally, I believe that the 6 degrees is measured perpendicular to the 62 degrees, so yes, just set the blade to 6 degrees and the miter gauge to cut the 62 and you will be good. I would leave things just a bit plump and make a final adjustmemt with a hand plane and a batten tacked along the ends of the floors. Fairness will always supercede rigid adherence to a given dimension
    Last edited by SMARTINSEN; 06-20-2017 at 11:14 PM.
    Steve Martinsen

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    39

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    When I was doing the floors (which along with the stem is all I have done so far), I drew all of the lines for the AFT face (which is what the plans show) and then used a hand held circular saw to make the cuts. I just set the bevel on the saw for each cut and followed the lines. I figured this was easier than using my table saw.

    Don C.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    hood river oregon rgods4@msn.com
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: Simmons Sea Skiff 20 Design Plan Study

    hey, chilt, good to see you're progressing......any pics? or email with them? I discovered what you discovered.....most cuts on the boat are best done away from the table saw. It's easier that way. I found the table saw very daunting, and switched most all cuts to the bandsaw....floors, frames. The "wedge" in front of the motorwelll was all done on the bandsaw....very easy/safe. The angle cuts on my motorwell, however, I did on the tablesaw and I held my breath all the while....had ad to be close to blade to hold the large board steady.....did not relish that part. If I was doing that part over again, I'd choose jig saw, hand plane, rasp....something very safe. Hand held jigsaw works very well, and is easy to use - however, the 'steady hand' might not be there, but using a movable long board as a fence can help keep cut pretty straight. Keep posting! Pictures!

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