Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 42

Thread: Boat Design Software?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cumming, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Boat Design Software?

    I would like recommendations for good FREE boat design software. I downloaded the Free Version of DelftShip, but have not installed it yet. Any comments, warnings, recommendations? Better free software?
    I'm not a new-by; well maybe I am. Over 50 years ago I designed a boat with T-square, triangles, and tiny wooden battens (student at Georgia Tech); built it, and sailed it. Just want to try something like that again using current design technology. Any help is appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    I use the DelftShip derivative Freeship. I am perfectly happy with it, it is nearly as good as the professional design software that I used before I retired, although it does not do the stability calculations required by regulatory authorities.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cumming, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Thanks, Peerie. I'll look into FreeShip. I don't need a lot of bells and whistles, just something to workout the offsets for a simple 12 foot rowing pram/punt type fishing boat for now.

    Louie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    The softwre needs input data files. I sketched the chine/clinker lap curves, then used Excel to prepare the input data befor fairing and tweaking in Freeship. You can enter station curves for a carvel form if you prefer.
    This is the output for a four strake Northumberland coble



    It will output plank developments as well
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Salem, MA
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    I use Delftship/Freeship for refinement of a design. They both import Carlson HULL design files directly.

    I use Carlson Hulls Designer to expedite the initial stages as it does a great job of producing a well faired hull with great simplicity.
    http://carlsondesign.com/projects/hull-designer/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    15,655

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    The softwre needs input data files. I sketched the chine/clinker lap curves, then used Excel to prepare the input data befor fairing and tweaking in Freeship. You can enter station curves for a carvel form if you prefer.
    This is the output for a four strake Northumberland coble



    It will output plank developments as well
    Oh. Me likey.

    Peace,
    Robert

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North East England
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    I use Delftship no issues. I have designed a ply canoe, unfolded in Delftship, transferred to another CAD package and plotted out (using high street print shop) and used as patterns to build the canoe without issue and no hand corrects to any parts.




    I also use the free version web based software Onshape for general CAD and layouts. Onshape works on iPad even out and about hot spotted to the phone. I have once brought a file in to Onshape from Delftship and scaled it to the correct size. It could not be turned into anything editable but was good for reference. Have tried to do this again without any success.









    Delftship file in Onshape






    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by tink; 05-22-2017 at 02:41 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    24,652

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    I'm a fan of Delftship as well. Very good information on the stresses when you develop the panels.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-small-catboat

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saco, ME
    Posts
    2,215

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Rhino is the best program out there for boat design and there is a class in Computer Design that I teach at WB School. We learn how to put lines into the computer and generate a 2D and 3D model of a boat. It's an incredibly powerful program and pretty easy to use once you get into it.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    370

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    It's been some years since I experimented with Freeship, but I recall encountering two problems with the program. First, in a hull using developed plywood planking, the sections are often composed of curved lines, but Freeship always drew them straight (as in the forefoot of Peerie Maa's Northumberland coble). Second, although the instructions claimed that it was possible to draw lines by the classic method of entering offsets of points on the surface, I could never get the program to replicate a known design by this method.
    Peter Belenky

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North East England
    Posts
    1,295

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Rhino is commercial 3D package and yes top of the range but at a $$$ cost

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    196

    Default

    Ive had a lot of success with Carlson Hulls. The files are easily imported into freeship and on to Rhino. Hulls is probably the simplest and most fun way to play with concepts and ideas. Then they can be refined in more advanced programs.

    Hulls is a bit tricky to get working on windows 10. Bit worth the effort. http://carlsondesign.com/projects/hull-designer/

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Belenky View Post
    It's been some years since I experimented with Freeship, but I recall encountering two problems with the program. First, in a hull using developed plywood planking, the sections are often composed of curved lines, but Freeship always drew them straight (as in the forefoot of Peerie Maa's Northumberland coble). Second, although the instructions claimed that it was possible to draw lines by the classic method of entering offsets of points on the surface, I could never get the program to replicate a known design by this method.
    No longer the case. The forward few sections of the garboard on the 4 strake coble are visibly hollow. I have drawn a tunnel stern coble and the sections in way of the tunnel are curved.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    346

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    We use the Maxsurf suite (Maxsurf modeler/ Hydromax/Workshop/ stability and resistance) to develop our hulls. Yes, it is top of the line and expensive, but nothing compares. ( https://www.bentley.com/en/products/...ftware/maxsurf). Its generally what all the Naval Architects worldwide use. Then we use Rhino for other work within the design.
    Overall, you get what you pay for, which is no different to plan prices.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Salem, MA
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Belenky View Post
    It's been some years since I experimented with Freeship, but I recall encountering two problems with the program. First, in a hull using developed plywood planking, the sections are often composed of curved lines, but Freeship always drew them straight (as in the forefoot of Peerie Maa's Northumberland coble). Second, although the instructions claimed that it was possible to draw lines by the classic method of entering offsets of points on the surface, I could never get the program to replicate a known design by this method.
    A +1 for that

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saco, ME
    Posts
    2,215

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    The Deer Isle Koster was originally done in Delftship. When Bruce and I started working together I started with his files. They worked, but I had decided to focus on Rhino. No doubt Rhino handles curves better than most because of the NURBS basis. Rhino is not that expensive compared to the other CAD programs. Delftship would work for most amateur designers...when you get serious then you go Rhino. Even more serious, add Orca.

    We used Freeship at Landing School for a while...students used it to show real-time changes in prismatic coefficient...at least I think it was Freeship they were using. (I was teaching boatbuilding at the time.)

    Seen amazing stuff come out of MaxSurf.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    462

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    I use Rhino since the first released version (which was free IIRC?). Would be fun to try using it again.
    At university I got a student version which was 80% off.
    Rhino also spawned MOI which was also free in the beginning.

    I don't know if I do anything right but it seems to work well for unrolling surfaces. I never fair because I just use nurbs with one reference point. Almost all hulls I tried to draw from reference (pictures, plans or tables) could be replicated that way.
    Curvature graphs are also great.

    Does MAxSurf have an option to create a 3D form from 2D panels? That is something that would be great in Rhino....just an aproximation of course. A reverse unroll command if you like.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    370

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    If you place a ruler along the garboard sections near the forefoot of the coble, you can see that they are straight lines. Though they seem hollow when stacked one behind another, that is an optical illusion. If they were properly drawn as developed surfaces for plywood construction, they would be not concave but convex. Look at this picture of a Bolger Bobcat under construction:


    The first frame is convex, as it must be to support a plywood sheet that is bent inward toward the stem, curving around an imaginary line in a plane that is not a section.
    Peter Belenky

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Belenky View Post
    If you place a ruler along the garboard sections near the forefoot of the coble, you can see that they are straight lines. Though they seem hollow when stacked one behind another, that is an optical illusion. If they were properly drawn as developed surfaces for plywood construction, they would be not concave but convex. Look at this picture of a Bolger Bobcat under construction:


    The first frame is convex, as it must be to support a plywood sheet that is bent inward toward the stem, curving around an imaginary line in a plane that is not a section.
    Ya think so?


    Please try to remember who actually drew the lines.

    It is true that developable surfaces around the forefoot are convex when drawn by conic projection. However there is more than one way to skin a cat if the software is powerful enough.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    346

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    You don't want hollow waterlines in the forward sections.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bowdidge View Post
    You don't want hollow waterlines in the forward sections.
    Horses for courses Mark.


    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Frenchman's Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    After dabbling a bit with Carson hulls and the free version of Delftship I use Freehip Plus 3.4 exclusively. While it doesn't do everything that I like I'm pretty impressed with the capabilities it has for a free program. I managed to get started pretty easily and even now, after dabbling in designing small plywood boats with this software for over a year, I am still learning new things about this program all the time. It has no searchable help function but a pdf file that explains the functions on all the drop down menus. I recommend starting with Freeship and only switching to something costly if it doesn't meet all the needs.

    I also wish I could fold together pre-existing panels into a shape but it doesn't do that. So I do it with paper models or by endlessly iterating between tugging a few control points and developing panels.

    Freeship can calculate resistance, stability, and how much displacement a boat has for a given waterline. You can scale, rotate, mirror and/or move all or portions of the boat and develop a linesplan and plate layout. I work mostly with plywood designs involving bends in several directions (mild forms of torture) and needed to work out how to get my plates to look right in the program. Sometimes when it doesn't consider the panels developable it gives panels with weird steps or bumps that have to be faired in a CAD program or when doing the cutting layout on the plywood. In the example below it gave me differing panel shapes for bow and stern even though all the control points were completely symmetrical. Weird.

    The plates can be moved and slid together as one would lay them out on sheets of plywood but it doesn't actually let you ad the perimeter of plywood sheets. You can print the panels on paper or as pdf, with or without a measurement grid, station lines, waterlines, etc. or export them as a dxf file to be read by CAD programs.

    You can specify the thickness and density of the plates to obtain the total weight and location of the centre of gravity. Many hydrostatic variables can also be calculated, and recalculated for different displacements with the waterline in a different place. You can manually change the location of the "midships" used for the calculations and place it at the location of the maximum cross sectional area.

    I found out that for boats ~15' long the hollow waterlines at the bow seem to result in less resistance at speeds between 3 and 4 knots, which seem to still be normal cruising speeds (before you get so close to hull speed that resistance rises steeply). I used the Kaper method of resistance calculation (that is the only one included in the software for small, sleek displacement hulls) and it breaks the resistance into wetted surface and wavemaking components.

    Freeship does the 3D rendering better than Carlson Hulls but not as well as Rhino.

    With a wizard function you can add rudders or keels, but not simple rudders with flat sides or full length keels, just fancy foil shapes. I added full length keels and projecting stems by moving the sides of the boat apart and extruding the edge in the middle of the boat. Masts can be simulated by adding a cylinder, but I haven't yet found an easy way to add sails or thwarts, etc.

    Hulls can be smooth sided or with full or partial chines. Chines running the length of the boat can be used to automatically define the edges of the plates but you can also select and group faces between control points to define the plate edges. The control points float in the space outside the boat and only in rare occasions will they lie right on the surface of the hull. Chines can also be used around the girth of the boat to break the panels into manageable sections. However, this is fraught with some difficulty because each "girth chine" creates a hard spot in the hull and you have to use the control points around it to try and fair it out. Breaking a strake into plates without creating a hard chine results in a curved edge at the joint. I've also had to add extra control points in the middle of the panels to either curve or straighten them out in the linesplan in the same way an actual plywood panel would behave. The effects of adding and/or moving control points aren't always intuitive and this results in a bit of a learning curve, especially for a tortured hull. The "developability check" function is pretty conservative and so far the 4mm okoume plywood has willingly assumed all sorts of shapes that Freeship considered to be "non-developable". With 6mm or thicker plywood one would have to be more careful.

    The functions for importing a linesplan as a picture and using it as a template for a hull model are pretty good but took me a while to figure it out. I've created models of several existing designs from thumbnail sketches on the net. I calculated things such as stability, resistance, and waterline length and freeboard at different loads, for them and compared them to my own designs.

    One of my designs as an example, a child's boat slightly longer than 8':








    I used a chine around the girth of the boat to split the boat into a bow and stern half, but in the rendering the shading reveals a slight kink where the halves join. In the actual build I screwed the plywood plates to a pretty solid frame and there is no kink. The bottom and stems are solid wood and not shown on this plywood layout.

    The build thread is here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-little-nephew
    It will be updated it soon once I process and upload a few more recent pictures.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    462

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Because BOI mentioned rendering in Rhino. The default rendered viewport is not that nice but there is a free viewport rendering plugin called Neon available.
    http://v5.rhino3d.com/group/neon/pag...-to-view-rhino
    Unwrapping can be pretty tricky in Rhino too.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    BOI.
    I export the lines plan and developments into Draftsight, in which I can nest on plywood sheets, or develop a full GA and component panels for built in buoyancy.

    I intend to post a thread on a motor coble that can be built of 16' by 4' ply sheets, with only one scarf in the shear strake. I have the Draftsight drawings and am beginning to cut the components for a 16th scale model. When complete I will write the thread.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Frenchman's Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    That coble project sounds really interesting.

    I think I'll stay away from Rhino for the time being (not free) but the renderings that Clint Chase has on his website are nice and whatever Flo-mo uses is awesome too. Rendering isn't everything, actual photos are better, but a bit of 3d helps for visualizing a boat before it is built from angles that you cannot see on the linesplan. Freeship sometimes puts in weird bumps or shading where I'm pretty sure it will look different (and better) in the finished boat. This often cannot be faired out by adding control points but reducing the number of control points usually doesn't work either because you lose something somewhere else.

    If at some point I want to produce a boat plan for anything but personal use I'll get serious about using a drafting program. I'll definitely investigate Draftsight; just got it downloaded.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    24,652

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Belenky View Post
    It's been some years since I experimented with Freeship, but I recall encountering two problems with the program. First, in a hull using developed plywood planking, the sections are often composed of curved lines, but Freeship always drew them straight (as in the forefoot of Peerie Maa's Northumberland coble). Second, although the instructions claimed that it was possible to draw lines by the classic method of entering offsets of points on the surface, I could never get the program to replicate a known design by this method.
    Drawn in an older version of Delftship:





    Never heard the claim that you could draw lines from offsets. It would be a nice feature.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    The OP was about free, therefore as delftship free is a disabled [updated visually and usably] version of freeship or freeship plus, then the latter choices are the only ones worth considering.
    That is if we’re talking free.

    **

    To get to truly usable output from those, one probably has to put in 50-100 hours with minimal expectation. Otherwise workarounds to its inabilities or reasonable ways to model will just not be apparent. It is a frustrating, juvenile program in many ways, but has great functionality as well. You have to get past the frustration to see the good stuff.

    So for example, offset input/output has some issues as modelling is drawn using a control grid that is off the surface [which the offsets modelling is done]– which is very difficult for the program to predict – [but it is usable]. But input/output of markers for a similar thing is spectacular as they lie on the surface. The only issue is that one then has to shift the model to match them.

    Take BOI’s example of a situation where she desires to put in discontinuities in the middle of her cradle boat – and then has to guess at what best shape those chine lines should be to get back to her more fair lines. If she draws the boat without discontinuity, then outputs chine markers [always at the highest resolution], then inputs those same markers – she can then interrupt the surface and put in the best number of internal points that she wishes and modify the new model back close to where she originally had it. The following old [I’m being patient with my picture hosting site problems] example is sort of similar where adding modifications changes the location, but the original location has been output/input as markers. Now ‘all’ one has to do is edit the new situation to match the original to one’s satisfaction.



    Or peeriemah-Nick could output all his coble chines [or stations wherever he wants, or both!], bring them back in as markers and make subtle changes to achieve the tunnel and yet not get too far off 3D base of what he originally drew [or have something right there accurately placed in all views for judgement] – if that’s what he wanted.


    Or bring in the offsets , then bring in the offsets again as markers and modify the odd model situations to match the definitive marker locations. For example here’s an output/input bulkhead. The offsets input modelling doesn’t quite match the actual offsets marker situation [which is on the surface], but with some quick manipulation and editing could be brought into an acceptable match quite easily.



    So when one talks about what is the best free program [where you control your own work] for our purposes, the question should really be - what is the second best free program? . . . but one has to get beyond the point where workarounds to frustrations and good modelling practices become apparent. Short tests are gigo.
    bcmarinetrails.org - an attempt, by volunteers, to protect and enable 27,000 km of continuous camping and accesses along and around the whole Wild West Coast of British Columbia - for small beachable craft

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    Drawn in an older version of Delftship:





    Never heard the claim that you could draw lines from offsets. It would be a nice feature.
    This from the Freeship 2.6 user manual
    3.5.4 Surface
    .
    Import a textfile containing a number of 3D curves. This
    option can best be used when the offsets of a round
    bottomed hull need to be imported. These curves may
    have any number of points which may differ from curve to
    curve. Usually the curves run from the bottom of the hull
    upwards, however longitudinal curves are allowed too,
    just as long as all the curves have the same orientation
    and run in the same direction. It is important that the
    curves are not crossing each other.

    The user will be prompted how many points in
    longitudinal direction (number of columns) and in
    vertical direction (number of rows) the imported
    hull must have. Then the program fits a B-Spline
    surface through these points such that the new
    surface interpolates these points.
    The first line of the file must either be a 0 (zero) or a 1. A zero indicates that all coordinates are in
    meters while a one indicates that the coordinates are in feet. Each curve is defined by a sequence
    of X,Y and Z coordinates separated by at least 1 space. The end of a curve is indicated by an
    empty line after the last coordinate. The last line in the file should be 'EOF'. The following is an
    example of a file containing 3 stations.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cumming, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Thanks to all for your advice and discussion of design software.

    Here's the latest: I have used both Delftship and Freeship since I started this thread and have tended to stay with Freeship for my Pram project.
    Everything is going well now; I had a number of false starts but I've learned a few things about Freeship. I still have a couple of questions/problems to ask about.

    1. For my pram I entered a .txt file with the chines: aft to fore, bottom to shear. When I develop the planks I don't get the two transoms. How do I get Freeship to develop the transoms?
    2. I am not up-to-speed on interpreting all the stability and some other calculations (I think I do understand displacement in long tons and the various areas). Is there somewhere on the web where I can educate myself? Or, maybe a book?

    Thanks for any help
    Louie

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Frenchman's Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    I can only address #1; I'm not familiar enough with stability calculations to really explain anything.

    There could be two reasons you don't see the transoms, either they are not actually there in the model or you don't have them turned on as developable in the layer dialog.

    If the first is true you don't see them either in any the different views or the linesplan. You can create them by extruding the edge of the transom and then moving all the points to a y of 0.

    It is more likely that they exist already, and if so they should have a separate listing in the layer dialog. For each layer there are checkboxes for things like whether they are developable and whether you like to see them in the linesplan or would like to use them for hydrostatics calculations. You can check what faces are in each layer by turning them off one at a time to see what disappears.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Freeship does not print a development of the transoms, you will need to interrogate the model to get the x y z coordinates, or develop the shape in Draftsight.

    For the hydrostatics have a read of this, then get back to us with questions
    http://www.marineinsight.com/naval-a...surface-ships/

    This is much more detailed, you will only need the half of it.
    http://dl.kashti.ir/ENBOOKS/Ship%20H...ity%202003.pdf
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Flattop Islands
    Posts
    2,240

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    In Freeship each "plank" or strake in a hard chine hull will be on a different layer. That way they develop as separate parts. The transom or transoms are the same, as long as they are on a different layer they develop as separate parts.

    An easy way to make a separate transom is to turn on a new layer (with nothing in it), make it developable, select all the points on the perimeter of the transom (all in one plane for a flat transom), and extrude those points transversely to the centerline (-). That should be a separate transom.
    ___________________________________
    Tad
    cogge ketch Blackfish
    cat ketch Ratty
    http://www.tadroberts.ca
    http://blog.tadroberts.ca/
    http://www.passagemakerlite.com

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,899

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    I must confess that I prefer to design a hull by carving a half model after first chosing a mid ship section. It lets my eye and hands get a good feel for it! In sixty years of doing this have yet to experience a design problem that produced a bad boat. However I have a new client who has many restrictions placed on what he is asking for due to unique saftey concerns. So, I plan to run the finished proposed hull design through a computer program check just to see how it stacks up before building it.
    Jay

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    41,834

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I must confess that I prefer to design a hull by carving a half model after first chosing a mid ship section. It lets my eye and hands get a good feel for it! In sixty years of doing this have yet to experience a design problem that produced a bad boat. However I have a new client who has many restrictions placed on what he is asking for due to unique saftey concerns. So, I plan to run the finished proposed hull design through a computer program check just to see how it stacks up before building it.
    Jay
    A Scottish shipyard, I think McDuff at Banff, published their design process for a wooden MFV. They first sketched the design, including the engine and deadwoods, to ensure that the engine would fit. Then they carved a model from which the lines were lifted and faired.

    That method will not work for a developable set of surfaces without a lot of work on the 'puter.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Cumming, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Boat Design Software?

    Thanks for the links; I have downloaded them and will review them later. I found a brief stability lesson on Wikipedia under "Metacentric Height." As for developing the transoms, I just increased the Heights of the points by the ratio of the hypotenuse over the vertical leg of the right triangle formed at the transom.

    Thanks for all your help.

    Louie


    For the hydrostatics have a read of this, then get back to us with questions
    http://www.marineinsight.com/naval-a...surface-ships/

    This is much more detailed, you will only need the half of it.
    http://dl.kashti.ir/ENBOOKS/Ship%20H...ity%202003.pdf[/QUOTE]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •