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Thread: Radiata plywood

  1. #1
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    Apr 2005
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    1,380

    Default Radiata plywood

    Just read John Harris' article on marine plywood in the May/June issue of WB. Now, I know it's not a true "marine" plywood, but I'm wondering if anyone has used or are using it in boat construction. When last at my favorite "premium" lumber supplier, I got into a discussion about it with one of the employees. Long story short, I bought a sheet of it (3/4"). Appearance wise, it's beautiful stuff - even the B side is not bad. I cut a small piece, and soaked in water for 2 weeks- not a hint of de-lamination. Anyone have any experience with it?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    118

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    I never heard of the stuff but you got me looking now. Looks hard to come by for me locally but available for shipping. I haven't read the current issue of WB, I guess I should stop procrastinating.
    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
    http://www.youtube.com/c/SixPointsWoodWorks

  3. #3
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    May 2012
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    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
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    4,518

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    No idea about the plywood, or what it's soaked in/ glued with/ treated with etc, but untreated Punus Radiata rots if you look at it. Brightest firewood there is though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    D'Iberville, Ms
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    9

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    I bought a sheet of it from Home Depot a few weeks ago. I cut a few frames from it for a small jon boat I am building. Since it will be covered with epoxy and paint I figured it would work for my application. They only sell 3/4" and it does have some small voids so I wouldn't use it for hull panels.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Whangarei New Zealand
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    592

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    Used well above the waterline has been OK where I have used it, but need to explain that design and application has been tilted in favour of non traditional western naval architecture…….in other words, I have not use it for hull planking or conventional deck or deckhouse structures.
    Hulls are canoes, which are made of synthetic fibre resin matrix composites.
    Hopefully I will get around to completion of the concept where basal parts of the hulls are natural fibre resin matrix composites.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    On the river, Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,727

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    Quote Originally Posted by GregH View Post
    Just read John Harris' article on marine plywood in the May/June issue of WB. Now, I know it's not a true "marine" plywood, but I'm wondering if anyone has used or are using it in boat construction. When last at my favorite "premium" lumber supplier, I got into a discussion about it with one of the employees. Long story short, I bought a sheet of it (3/4"). Appearance wise, it's beautiful stuff - even the B side is not bad. I cut a small piece, and soaked in water for 2 weeks- not a hint of de-lamination. Anyone have any experience with it?
    I built a boat from it close to 30 years ago, it was from a New Zealand mill rather than the Chilean product from Bunnings, and its only just been condemned to the scrap heap, and that due to the solid wood rotting out rather than the plywood. I didnt soak it in epoxy but did put five coats of paint on the interior.
    9mm CpD grade, cheap stuff, lasted very well.
    I'd stress that it needs to be painted and that paint maintained.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,417

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    or cut, fitted then sent off for pressure impregnation. Then it won't rot !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    New Zealand's Far North
    Posts
    8,134

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    There is a treated grade of NZ made radiata plywood. One version is called Shadowclad and is sold as a cladding for buildings. It is durable in that context.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
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    73,417

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    There is H5 ply available here, IIRC it's rated 7 years in the ground.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cape Fear, NC, USA
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    2,782

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    Overview:
    http://www.araucoply.com/informacion...in=0&idioma=44

    Technical:
    http://www.araucoply.com/informacion...in=0&idioma=44

    Catalog/Brochure:
    http://www.araucoply.com/informacion...in=0&idioma=44

    **********

    AraucoPly
    AraucoPlyŽ Sanded Panels are finished with 150-grit sandpaper on the face and 120-grit sandpaper on the back, facilitating easy finishing with excellent results. All grade-stamped AraucoPlyŽ Sanded Panels are manufactured in accordance with the US PS 1-09 product standard, and all ACX and BCX products are PS1-09 underlayment compliant and are edge stamped as such by TECO.

    100% radiata pine.
    Stable composed core with mínimum voids.
    High quality solid face.
    Ideal for interior and exterior applications
    Pre-sanded and ready to finish
    Allows a variety of finishes

    - A Grades:
    No more than 6 wood patches
    No more than 6 synthetic repairs
    Small, wood-based putty repairs are allowed.
    - B Grades:
    No more than 6 wood patches
    No more than 8 synthetic repairs
    Small, wood-based putty repairs are allowed.

    Cp Grades:
    All type of repairs are accepted.
    Open defects are not accepted.

    Applications:
    Staircases.
    Table and counter tops.
    Base panel for high-pressure lamination.
    General industrial applications.
    Cabinets and furniture.
    Underlayment.
    General DIY projects.

    Adhesive
    All AraucoPlyŽ panels are laid up with phenolic WBP glue which is suitable for exterior use. This glue complies with European standard EN 314. Formaldehyde emission is 0.02 mg/L, which meets E1 emission regulations.

    ************************
    Our local BigBox stores started carrying this recently (2016) and it is the first good looking ply (non-marine & non-Baltic Birch) I have seen in a hand full of years.
    Southern yellow pine construction grade plywoods are pleasantly strong and durable and will do better in most exterior applications but is far from a furniture grade which the AraucoPly seems to be. My only grip so far is that the 1/4" I have seen in pictures is only a 3-ply => YUCK!

    Production History:
    AraucoPly's Chilean mill burned down in 2012 and 2 years and $200M later a new mill was brought online.
    The growing is plantation/sustainable, the quality very good and price/performance is very good.

    http://www.woodworkingnetwork.com/wo...239178421.html

    Last edited by George Ray; 05-21-2017 at 06:47 AM.
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    I used 1/2" radiata for the bottom of my bolger clam skiff. Beautiful stuff. 5 equal plys and not a void to be found. The bottom is 2 two layers, laminated with epoxy. I had the first layer tacked down to trim to size when I was surprised by a sudden rain storm. Much, but not all of the radiata warped impressively and had to be replaced. I launched in May 2015 and the bottom has given no problem. Be that as it may. Use a better material if you can.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Radiata plywood

    I used 1/2" radiata for the bottom of my bolger clam skiff. Two layers, laminated with epoxy. I had the first layer tacked down to trim to size w

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