Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 45 of 45

Thread: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    A-PPROVED. Great lines, looks so sweet. Nice find, and Wandering Star is a great name! Congrats!

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    Thanks Call. Wandering Star is the big boat, a 39' ketch. The dory hasn't a name yet.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,145

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    Sailed the boat today. Wind was very light, but she turns quickly and points well. Rows a little heavy, maybe longer oars, maybe filling in the partial double bottom.
    Hopefully here are some pics:

    I take it that the bottom has some rubstrakes running down the centerline and curved along the chines. The chine ones do create some drag and if you are not grounding the boat out may not be need full. The one down the centerline is a little handier, not so much drag and helps in keeping the dory running straight. Dories are not notably fast rowers, but steady. What are your oar lengths?
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    Thanks Ben. The original boat depicted in The Dory Book has a complete double or false bottom, this one only on the edges. Gardner cautions against this, other writers too. I did not measure the oars, but they are seven or eight feet. Not terribly short for a boat with 4'8" beam, not very long either. I may see if I have a longer pair in the basement. What surprised me about rowing her was that she did not seem to carry way well, and the stroke was harder than I expected. The second may be because I am used to rowing a much lighter dory tender. I have rowed heavier boats, a 19' dory, 20' keel sloop, 26' Friendship, the latter two with a single oar very patiently. Even the 19, which I once rowed a couple of miles, I did not waste effort pulling hard, just an easy stroke to keep her moving.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,145

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    I'm using 8's on my 4' beam North Shore dory, a little skinnier and tippier than the Dion. Rowing only. They work well in the midships and forward stations, and I have a second 7'6" pair for the stern station. If i cross hands a lot I can use the long ones there. I'd say you need at least 8 footers. You may need to play with the stroke some. Look at Chris Cunningham's article on the dory stroke in WoodenBoat. Where these boats really shine is when you have two people pulling. I've not pulled the edges on my dory ( appropriately named TIPSY ) as she lives on a haul out and gets into regular contact with a rocky beach. So it stays a steady 3 knot boat.

    I couldn't tell if you had steering ropes or a tiller extension. The old dories generally were sailed with a couple of people so could get weight distributed. Been my experience that you have to get into the middle when sailing solo to have a good sailing exprience.

    I also carry a 5 gallon waterbag to be able to trim the dory right depending on the wind. Not so much an issue when you have sails!
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    Thanks again. The boat has neither a tiller extension nor steering ropes. I realized on my first sail that I wanted them or trim ballast. My old dory used ballast, my tender too. I have used one or five gallon bottles, shot bags or exercise weights.
    The dory tender is a glued lap ply 10'. I believe you have one too, built of solid wood. Mine rows beautifully if I use trim ballast and remember not to pull too hard. I have had over 600# of people in it, inside a harbor of course.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    I also noted that the dory, while initially tender, stiffens up impressively when heeled onto her broad strakes. Which explains photos of these boats heeled over, sailing well with a relaxed crew.
    I may start another thread for the dory, now that this thread has served it's purpose.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    9,746

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    Melonseed sold today. The new owner is very excited, it was a bit gut-wrenching to watch it go away.
    I remember when I sold my 20' Stadel pilot sloop. Four years building and three years sailing. Gut-wrenching is the word when giving it up.

    Glad you found your dory. I was thinking that a 14' boat would be a wee bit small for sailing on the Sound.
    My Hvalsoe 13 (13'6") is a fun little boat, but I would never take it on big water.
    Your 17' dory was designed with salty sailing in mind.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    Thanks Rich. If you get down to the island, we'll go sailing again.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,216

    Default Re: Melonseed, Penobscot Or?

    I've sailed the dory several times now, enough to compare it to the Melonseed. The 'seed is faster, quicker and points higher. The dory is more comfortable, seaworthy, and dryer. They take about the same time to rig or un-rig. The 'seed was so light that she was easier to launch and recover. I could actually lift her off the trailer and lean her against the garage wall. Both boats are very beautiful. Yesterday I sailed the dory upwind through a tide rip, and shipped a cup of water over the lee side. The melonseed would have taken a lot of spray. I'm happy with my dory, and will work on improving her performance.
    (The melonseed I have recorded over 5 knots in still water, the dory only about 4.5)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •