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Thread: Sandpaper suggestions

  1. #1
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    Default Sandpaper suggestions

    It's been a long time since I've felt good enough to work on my sailboat build, but alas I think the time has finally come! My question is pretty basic here, what sandpaper brand and grit do you recommend from me to remove year-old hardened smooth epoxy? I will be using a Bosch 1250 devs (6" rotary sander) with a Fein vacuum attached for dust control.

    Unfortunately I made some miistakes and need to get back down to the raw wood (cedar strip).

    Or, would I better off using a portable power planer, heat & scraper, chemical stripper or some other option?

    As always your advice and wisdom is appreciated! Eric
    Last edited by eflanders; 05-18-2017 at 09:45 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    I'd start with a heat gun and a hook scrapper. Get the resin just warm enough to soften it and the scraper will take most of it right off. With most of the resin gone, you can get the rest with 100 grit paper on your sander. Wear a mask to keep the dust out of your lungs.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Yep, heat gun and scraper. I try to never sand epoxy.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    OK heat gun and scraper it is. Thanks!

    For general sanding work on raw wood, is the Abranet or Mirka (screen type) sandpaper better for dust control than say the standard multi-hole sanding discs? Does it last as long as a good grade paper disc?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Abranet or an equivalent copy is a big step forward in sand paper technology.



    The massively improved dust extraction throughout the mesh, eliminates clogging, improves effectiveness, reduces time and reduces dust exposure. It's also easier than trying to locate paper with the correct dust extraction hole layout for your tool or perforating them.

    For 15 the hand held Mirka sanding block is also good for little outlay - the dust nozzle works great and there is no motor weight, noise or buzz that can become tyresome when fine finishing.



    You might need a dual compund sponge sanding block for convex/ concave surfaces too.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    I've been using Abranet for years and it is great, but it's also very frail when used at corners and edges. Once it starts to shred on the outer edge of the net, it only gets worse. I go between Klingspor paper and Abranet for my 6" Mirka. Abranet is great for flat areas, but regular sandpaper holds up tremendously better when any edges or corners are involved. 80-100 grit is great for epoxy.
    - John

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    I've been pleased with a fairly new Norton product -- ProSand Multi-air -- many very small holes for good dust collection, but no need to match the 5 or 8 holes of your sander -- and with a good strong backing

    http://www.nortonabrasives.com/sites...orton-8595.pdf
    Last edited by Greg Nolan; 05-18-2017 at 11:44 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by bnaboatbuilder View Post
    I've been using Abranet for years and it is great, but it's also very frail when used at corners and edges. Once it starts to shred on the outer edge of the net, it only gets worse. I go between Klingspor paper and Abranet for my 6" Mirka. Abranet is great for flat areas, but regular sandpaper holds up tremendously better when any edges or corners are involved. 80-100 grit is great for epoxy.
    This is pretty much what I do.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nolan View Post
    I've been pleased with a fairly new Norton product -- ProSand Multi-air -- many very small holes for goo dust collection, but no need to match the 5 or 8 holes of your sander -- and with a good strong backing

    http://www.nortonabrasives.com/sites...orton-8595.pdf
    Sounds interesting. I think I'll track some down and give it a try.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    ^ About a dollar per 6" disc in a box of 50 from Hartville Tool. That is a bit more than Festool Rubin, which I am not entirely pleased with on the basis of longevity. I think that I too shall give it a try next time. I like the Norton blue better than the 3M purple.
    Steve Martinsen

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    I have always felt heating epoxy is more dangerous than sanding it.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I have always felt heating epoxy is more dangerous than sanding it.
    Rather than jump into that old argument... I'll just say VENTILATION!!!! Both sanding and heating call, BEG, and SCREAM for as much ventilation as one can arrange. Wiz manages it by working outside in the sea-breeze. The rest of us need to remember to open doors and windows, or rig fans, or - preferably - both.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I have always felt heating epoxy is more dangerous than sanding it.
    What do you feel the danger of heating epoxy is? I've always been told that the real danger is the particulate matter getting into your lungs. Any chemical fumes produced by heating have to be less dangerous than those released during application. Epoxy sanding dust is a serious irritant to the lungs.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Nothing scientific. Just the hideous stench of burning epoxy.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    It doesn't take much heat to soften epoxy. There is no need to get it hot enough to create a hideous stench. There is no way to sand epoxy without creating clouds of noxious dust. Heat and scraper is quicker than sandpaper. You don't consume mounds of expensive sanding discs. And at this point in the life of my aging auditory organs, I choose to minimize their exposure to the sound of an RO sander chewing its way through the surface of an epoxy coated panel.

    It may be time to alter your thinking...at least on this one.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    The day that a scraper is faster than a sander....

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    I don't understand this statement at all "There is no way to sand epoxy without creating clouds of noxious dust." by SchoonerRat

    My boat project started in a 12'x24' bow roof shed, insulated and closed in. I have a ceiling mounted air filtration unit which is more common now for woodworking shops, I use a 6" Mirka connected to a Fein vac and wear a dusk mask as well. No clouds of dust anywhere, very little dust sits on the surface which is then easily vacuumed off and wiped cleaned before further coatings. Fein and Mirka aren't loud either but I wear earplugs or listen to headphones while I sand.

    All this isn't rocket science, it's just smart workshop health methods, no different than just about any woodworking shop these days which cares about the condition of a person's lungs. The triple approach is written up a lot these days, contain dust at the source, have any dust airborne filtered by face masks as well as wall or ceiling units.

    All very easy to accomplish on small budgets. None of this is voodoo, quite simple for anyone and everyone.
    - John

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Sandpaper suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by bnaboatbuilder View Post
    I don't understand this statement at all "There is no way to sand epoxy without creating clouds of noxious dust." by SchoonerRat
    OK, let me explain.

    You have a solution to the problem. That solution in no way negates the fact that the problem was created in the first place. I didn't say that there was no way to deal with the dust. I just inferred that it presents a problem.

    That asbestos lagging on the exhaust system of your old boat presents no health hazzard...til it starts fraying and becomes dust particles that can be inhaled. If I wanted to remove the asbestos from my boat, as my first step, I would choose a method that minimized the creation of toxic dust. My method of choice would not be sanding, no matter how good my dust extraction was.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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