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Thread: Walnut shell anti slip

  1. #1
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    Default Walnut shell anti slip

    Does anybody have the application technique down?

    I would like to know how it's done to achieve uniformity.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    I find that I can't do the sprinkle from a shaker approach very well and since I'm generally outdoors in a wind, that's not on anyway.

    I mix it right in the can, pour into a tray, and use a short nap roller. I find that brushing it out causes the grit to drag but rolling is great. The ground shells stay in suspension much better than pumi'luckce but I give the can a hard stir before pouring more into the roller tray and I don't put too much in the tray at a time.

    G'luck

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Dunno about walnut shells, but I've had good results with Awlgrip's 'Griptex'. I shake full coverage onto wet paint, let it dry, remove what isn't stuck and add another THIN coat of paint.
    The 'coarse' grade of griptex works with two-part LPU paints. There's an extra coarse grade which I'd consider if using heavier paint.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Just as an option I'm going to start painting this week or next and going to paint up a test panel with one layer of paint, tape off a border then a second layer of paint with sugar covering it. Let dry and wash off sugar. Sugar forms the texture and leaves soft ridged pattern when washed away that is supposed to be grippy without being too hard when kneeling on it. Since it is so cheap you can liberally apply a full layer for coverage so the texture should be even. Again, I just read about this as an option and will test it shortly.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Thanks for good ideas all!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    I find that I can't do the sprinkle from a shaker approach very well and since I'm generally outdoors in a wind, that's not on anyway.

    I mix it right in the can, pour into a tray, and use a short nap roller. I find that brushing it out causes the grit to drag but rolling is great. The ground shells stay in suspension much better than pumi'luckce but I give the can a hard stir before pouring more into the roller tray and I don't put too much in the tray at a time.

    G'luck
    This for paint. Been doing it for 30 years. For varnish, I mix a measured amount of shells into a measured amount of varnish and use a brush.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    I find that I can't do the sprinkle from a shaker approach very well and since I'm generally outdoors in a wind, that's not on anyway.

    I mix it right in the can, pour into a tray, and use a short nap roller. I find that brushing it out causes the grit to drag but rolling is great. The ground shells stay in suspension much better than pumi'luckce but I give the can a hard stir before pouring more into the roller tray and I don't put too much in the tray at a time.

    G'luck
    Hey Ian. What is approx volume of shell per volume of paint?

    thanks!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Quote Originally Posted by outofthenorm View Post
    This for paint. Been doing it for 30 years. For varnish, I mix a measured amount of shells into a measured amount of varnish and use a brush.
    Why in God's name would somebody pour grit into varnish for a non-skid surface? We spend our lives trying to keep grit out of our varnish jobs!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    The reason they sell walnut shells for non-skid abrasive is, I think, because 1) they are dirt cheap and nobody's thought of any other use for the damn things, and 2) when you make a dog's breakfast of your deck paint job, walnut shells sand off easier than a lot of other things. I really don't understand this obsession for "non-skid" paint additives. Adding grits to the paint will never result in an even application, even if you keep stirring the paint continuously when painting because the grit will build up in the brush and end up being spread unevenly whatever you do.

    There are two options for a non-skid deck surface. One is planking, which will provide an adequate non-skid surface whether painted or not, assuming one uses a good seam stopping material like Jeffrey's Marine Glue. The other is a fabric covered deck, either traditional paint-soaked canvas over Irish felt or epoxy over Dynel fabric. If there is a need for a non-skid surface over a smooth one, such as on a cabin top on either side of the mast where one might be standing to haul halyards, "non-skid patches" are easily made. Simply tape around the area you want to "non-skid," either in strips or a full patch where you want the "rough" to be. Then paint on a thin coat of mixed epoxy resin and then while it is still uncured, gently pour a layer of coarse sand about an inch thick on top of the uncured epoxy and leave it alone until the epoxy cures. (Don't mess or fiddle with it. Just pile the sand on.) The weight of the sand will uniformly press the lowest grains into the epoxy, where they will stay when the epoxy hardens. When the epoxy hardens, simply vacuum up the loose sand, brush off the grains that are just barely stuck and vacuum them up. Then apply a thinned coat of paint to the patches until they sand is fully covered. (Here's where you will discover that it takes a lot more paint than one might expect to cover a rough surface than a smooth one.) What you will have left is a perfectly uniform rough patch that looks as if it is part of the surrounding painted area. This is the only way I know to get a uniform rough surface. I've never ever seen anyone get a uniform surface by sprinkling walnut shells or anything else on a deck.
    Last edited by Bob Cleek; 05-16-2017 at 06:16 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Thanks Bob. It's a work boat and I don't want to slip.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    Why in God's name would somebody pour grit into varnish for a non-skid surface? We spend our lives trying to keep grit out of our varnish jobs!
    Varnished thwarts in a fancy rowing boat, varnished companion ladder and of course, the totally terrifying varnished decks. (which BTW, are 100% watertight, and always have been)



  12. #12

    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    As a rank amateur, I had good luck using rubber particles from Hamilton. I put down a coat a paint. My son followed me with the particles on a folded card, tapping it with his finger from perhaps a height of 18 inches. I'm sure it is not perfectly uniform, but pretty good. When dry and dusted and re-coated with an other coat of paint, it provides a good anti-skid without being to hard.

    Frank K.












  13. #13
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip



    Painted it last night and difficult posting pic (as usual on an iPad) ... but it turned out nice. I can't say there were exactly 10 grits per square inch, but definitely not blotchy. I mixed enough in a half quart of paint that still made the paint easily applied, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 shells per 1 part paint. Easy enough.

    https://goo.gl/photos/q6xS4k2nmHddV91w5

    Thanks again

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Quote Originally Posted by wollybugger View Post
    Thanks Bob. It's a work boat and I don't want to slip.
    In that case, I would have suggested you check out what the local workboats are using. Many use coating systems intended for sure footing in heavy work areas. Paint-on pickup truck bed liner products are one favorite. Not only do they provide an excellent non-skid surface, but they also produce a water-proof membrane. However, if you've done it now and you're happy with it, enjoy it in good health!

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    The reason they sell walnut shells for non-skid abrasive is, I think, because 1) they are dirt cheap and nobody's thought of any other use for the damn things,
    They are a top choice for 'media' blasting.

    You know, what we used to call sand blasting.
    Rattling the teacups.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Walnut shell anti slip

    I know that the OP already took care of his application but I said I would follow up and someone may come upon this thread. It took a couple of days as I needed to wait a day between each of the coats. As a test I painted two coats of oil based enamel on a scrap piece of plywood, not epoxy coated so grain does show through. I masked off the edges and rolled on a third coat and covered it with sugar. The next day I scrubbed it off while flooding it with water. The resulting pattern is very soft, feels like suede. The interesting thing is when it was wet the straight painted surface was very slippery under hand. The textured part gripped very well, zero slip. And, it feels nice. The pattern is extremely even, just a matte surface. It was tough to photograph well.




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