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Thread: inwhale

  1. #1
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    Default inwhale

    How do salty types pronounce "inwhale"?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Arrrrgh yer bloody fool, I didn't bloody tell yer to breathe in, it's that bloody bit of wood right there under yer arse!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: inwhale

    I believe properly spelt, it's without an "h". Inwale. So that would be pronounced "in-wail".

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    Default Re: inwhale

    Story of the West Indian taxi driver giving a tour. He points out a breadfruit tree and a passenger asks how to spell breadfruit. He sez " we don't spell it, we eat it".

  5. #5
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    Default Re: inwhale

    If gunwale is pronounced gunnel, then shouldn't inwale be pronounced innel? I don't know the answer - just suggesting, and with the understanding there is a lot about the language that makes no sense.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Would an inwhale [sic] also be known as the "Jonah Strake"?

    Alex

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    Default Re: inwhale

    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post
    Would an inwhale [sic] also be known as the "Jonah Strake"?

    Alex
    Possibly, but how, in this instance, would one pronounce Strake?

    Jeff

  8. #8
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    Default Re: inwhale

    I suspect that inwhale is an Americanism and that there is a perfectly proper name for it which makes no sense. I mean it's not like the other part is called an out whale is it?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Possibly, but how, in this instance, would one pronounce Strake?
    I leave that to another, more-qualified linguist.

    I suspect that inwhale is an Americanism...
    Really?! I thought inwale was more international than that. Inwales and gunwales.

    Y'learn somethin' new every day...

    Alex

  10. #10
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I suspect that inwhale is an Americanism and that there is a perfectly proper name for it which makes no sense. I mean it's not like the other part is called an out whale is it?
    Inwale and outwale are common terms in the North American canoe world. See https://books.google.com/books?id=BK...utwale&f=false for more examples.

    Benson

  11. #11
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Rail and inner rail works for me. Outer rail when necessary for clarity.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: inwhale

    No 'h'.

    I pronounce it "innel" and the outer "gunnel".

    On classic sailing ships, there were no inner wales, just outer wales, only one of which was the gun wale.
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

    Next election, vote against EVERY Republican, for EVERY office, at EVERY level. Be patriotic, save the country.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerarddm View Post
    No 'h'.

    I pronounce it "innel" and the outer "gunnel".

    On classic sailing ships, there were no inner wales, just outer wales, only one of which was the gun wale.
    Just so, which got its name from the big guns close by. Which is to say, the "salty" types don't fuss with such petty stuff as inwales, which they might refer to in any case as a sheer clamp.
    -Dave

  14. #14
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    Default Re: inwhale

    ...which they might refer to in any case as a sheer clamp.
    I suppose it is, structurally, a sheer clamp.

    Alex

  15. #15
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Perhaps I am about to put my own ignorance on display, nevertheless: Wouldn't a boat have either an inwale or a shear clamp? If there are spacers between the shear plank and the inner longitudinal member, then it's an inwale. If no spacers, then it's a shear clamp. A gunnel will be a gunnel with or without external spacers. And, are there any boats that have spacers both inside and outside?

    Jeff

  16. #16
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    Default Re: inwhale

    In my opinion, if it is at the sheer height and doesn't support deck beams it is an inwale. If it supports deck beams and is below sheer height it is a sheer clamp. Not to be confused with the harpin, which is more like a beam shelf, but at sheer height and notched for frames.

    I pronounce them "gunnel" and "in-whale" I think "innel" sounds like you're trying too hard.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: inwhale

    I never smoked pot, but f I did, I would not have inwhaled

  18. #18
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    Default Re: inwhale

    I think it refers to the " side of the cockpit." So, depending upon the boat, it COULD be the sheer clamp or the harpin, or it could be, "ceiling." It refers to the location more than being a structural reference; sort of like, "topsides."

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: inwhale

    If there are spacers between the shear plank and the inner longitudinal member...
    The "spacers" I've seen offsetting the inwale/sheer clamp from the sheer strake have always been the frame heads --identical to in the larger boats I've had a chance to inspect, where that piece of wood is incontestibly a sheer clamp.

    So is it a sheer clamp only if it supports deckbeams?

    For that matter, how many angels *can* dance on the head of a pin?

    Alex

  20. #20
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Ply boats often have spacers that are nothing more than spacers to give the sheer structure some stiffness without too much weight. As to the angels on the pin, would that be a belaying pin, and if so for what size line?
    -Dave

  21. #21
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Sheer clamp is probably the word I was looking for.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: inwhale

    Ply boats often have spacers...
    Of course they do. Duh; I was being dense.

    As to the angels on the pin...
    Now *that* was a clever riposte.

    Alex

  23. #23
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    Default Re: inwhale

    this has been instructive!!

    I always called them "in-wales" or more often, innner rail, but I recently heard somebody call them "innels," and got to wondering. The only reason it matters is I'm working on a thing with a very salty English character who lectures a newbie to call them "innels," which personally I doubt is the common usage and I'll change it around now. I agree with J. Madison, "I think "innel" sounds like you're trying too hard"

    Besides, pronouncing the name of a structural element that's on the inside of the boat the same the corresponding element on the outside of the boat makes WAY too much sense and is totally contrary to the general obfuscation of boat lingo in general

  24. #24
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    Default Re: inwhale

    I happen to have a 1937 copy of the RN Manual of Seamanship, and the old ships' boats are shown with a gunwale (described as always square, landing inboard of the heads of the frames) and above and outboard of the gunwale was a wash strake. Outboard of all was a shaped board called, rather oddly, the rubber. I remember it as the rub rail, but my time was 20 years later than the 1937 manual. I suspect that anything called a rubber was politically incorrect by then.

    Tony.

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