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Thread: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

  1. #1
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    Default Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    http://www.storerboatplans.com/wp/de...r-boat-design/

    Ok there are about a million books about boat design or sailing.

    However, over the years there are some that have completely changed the way I think. I think they have strongly formed the types of boats I like to sail and of course shaped my boat designs.

    The most important thing is keeping an open mind and looking for an emprical basis for information. There is a lot of crap out there.

    Also balancing published information against what happens in real life.........
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Good compendium of provocative stuff. Thank you.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    no marchaj, no skenes, no gerr, no chappelle, no bolger???
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    no paladin, no whizbang, no gareth, no mcolgin, no acb, no bertenshaw???
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    no marchaj, no skenes, no gerr, no chappelle, no bolger???
    HI Paul,

    Those should be among the discussion for sure and thanks for bringing them up.

    But most people will be aware of them.

    Bolger has been hugely influential for me personally. I would wholeheartedly recommend Gerr's books.

    But it is good to bring things that are perhaps less known into the mix.

    This list is personal and chosen from things that may not be well known in the USA.

    Best wishes

    Michael.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Good compendium of provocative stuff. Thank you.
    Thanks Ian,

    That was the aim. These books have really shaped a lot of my background thinking about boats and structures.

    I think in particular that the J.E Gordon and the Twiname books are the best of type. Lots of boat stuff in Gordon along with architecture, chariots. He is very fond of wooden structures so these get a lot of time.

    Best wishes
    MIK

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Feel free to chime in with your favourites.

    MIK

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Mik,

    Interesting that you pointed out J.E.Gordon's "Structures or Why Things Don't Fall Down" on your site http://www.storerboatplans.com/wp/de...r-boat-design/ I have a hard back copy that I read in the late 1970's, and some parts were read several times. I found it extremely helpful for an electrical engineer and learned more about structural design and failure from that book than anywhere else. If you want to get deeper into structural analysis, you need to go to more technical sources but Gordon puts you on the right path. Some of the reviewers on Amazon found it tedious or boring but I guess anything can get boring if you are not interested in the subject. Only understanding what is in this book would have prevented many of the serious engineering disasters in the past made by people who should have known better.

    Another book that is good for laymen is "To Engineer Is Human" The Role of Failure in Successful Design by Henry Petroski. Structural failures from the brand new Kansas City Hyatt Regency Hotel walkway collapse that killed 114 people to the Challenger shuttle disaster result from overlooking simple details, although the Challenger gets into politics which can cancel out the best knowledge.

    Not very much about boats in either but a successful engineering approach does not change much.
    Tom L

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Lathrop View Post
    Mik,

    Interesting that you pointed out J.E.Gordon's "Structures or Why Things Don't Fall Down" on your site http://www.storerboatplans.com/wp/de...r-boat-design/ I have a hard back copy that I read in the late 1970's, and some parts were read several times. I found it extremely helpful for an electrical engineer and learned more about structural design and failure from that book than anywhere else. If you want to get deeper into structural analysis, you need to go to more technical sources but Gordon puts you on the right path. Some of the reviewers on Amazon found it tedious or boring but I guess anything can get boring if you are not interested in the subject. Only understanding what is in this book would have prevented many of the serious engineering disasters in the past made by people who should have known better.

    Another book that is good for laymen is "To Engineer Is Human" The Role of Failure in Successful Design by Henry Petroski. Structural failures from the brand new Kansas City Hyatt Regency Hotel walkway collapse that killed 114 people to the Challenger shuttle disaster result from overlooking simple details, although the Challenger gets into politics which can cancel out the best knowledge.

    Not very much about boats in either but a successful engineering approach does not change much.
    Howdy Tom,

    I as much like the Gordon books for their style. That lovely literate tone that grabs ideas from a wide range of classical sources, all translated by Gordon himself. Yep a classical scholar as well at the forefront of Energy view of fracture and the beginning of the storm of strong materials, a Naval Architect and an Aero Engineer.

    And a lover of wood.

    I wasn't aware of the Petroski Book. I'll have a dig around and see if I can find it. Sounds great.

    I picked up some nice reads from the Gordon text too. At least the ones I would not have to translate from Greek or Latin.
    The Southseaman (The life story of a Schooner) by Weston Martyr.
    Sliderule by Neville Shute Norway (that Neville Shute in Aero Engineer role). Shute became the chief engineer when the famous Barnes Wallis of the Dambuster bouncing bomb resigned. The calcs to resolve the structure of airships are just boggling when the fastest and most accurate calculation method you have is a sliderule. I've done enough analysis of 2D trusses to know that the problem grows so fast in complexity with added components but designing a whole airship is just awe inspiring. Not to mention the nail biting scenarios of the maiden flights. Sending engineers up to sew tears in the covers or hydrogen bags (not the disaster one would imagine) while zooting along at 70knots.

    For those imagining a slide rule that someone could hold in their hands ... these were often huge heavy spirals of metal around a wooden core. The spiral gave many feet of usable slide rule.

    When I worked at the State Chemistry Division in Adelaide (basically a labrat ... nothing grand) they had a couple of this type, but different model, of mechanical spiral sliderule. The rule on this one is 41ft long.



    MIK

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Mik Storer: Tools for thinking about sailing and boat design

    Fascinating "spiral" slide rule pictured above! I've never seen one of those before. Apparently the Thatcher cylindrical calculating rule was relatively more common. They now go for around $750-$1,000 in good condition. "Beaters" can be had for considerably less. They are a collectable, of course. A $25.00 electronic calculator is faster, more accurate, and won't make you go blind reading it.


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