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Thread: Defenestration

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,329

    Default Defenestration

    Well, the zip line to the walnut tree next door wouldn't work due to rope sag, so my wife and I solicited help from a neighbor and we muscled it out the window and down to the ground. Now I just need to make a boat cover, extend a trailer tongue, add some bunks, and transport it up north to clean water. The new paint job looks good out in the sun. Considering that I built it back in 1975 it cleaned up really well.






  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    41,152

    Default Re: Defenestration

    Finastkind.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    59,866

    Default Re: Defenestration

    Wow !! An impressive build and launching !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    12,386

    Default Re: Defenestration

    Awesome, Todd! I would love to know more about her, if you'd care to share...

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    8,860

    Default Re: Defenestration

    Very nice!
    Canadian ensign on the staff?
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,329

    Default Re: Defenestration

    Hudson Bay Company flag - you can find just about anything on the internet if you look long enough. Back in the early 1970s I used rock and roll money to buy part of a chain of backpacking shops. I was never a great business manager, but mostly my job was testing and being the buyer for canoes, kayaks, small sailboats and cross country skis for the corporation, and teaching the staff what they needed to know about the products, materials, and their construction.

    When I decided to build my first stripper one of the guys who worked in our shop was Norman Sims (co-author along with Mark Neuzil of an excellent new book "Canoes: A Natural History in North America"). I had tools and Norm had a garage, so we built several boats together. The big canoe was pretty much built simply because I wanted to know what it felt like to paddle a big, multi-paddler canoe and I was interested in Voyageur and fur trade stuff. The design is a modified distillation of several boats from Adney and Chapelle's book "The Bark Canoes and Skin Boats of north America" published by the Smithsonian. Modifications were alteration of the end heights, so that it could be car-topped on the store van without blocking the windshield too much, and a maximum length of 22', because Norm's garage was only slightly more than 22' diagonally. The boat is redwood strips, 1/4" thick on the sides, 5/16" thick on the bottom with 10 oz. fiberglass, doubled on the bottom, inside and out.

    Originally, it was to be painted fake birchbark, but the wood looked so nice on the outside that we left it clear glass. However, I always wondered what sort of luck I'd have doing a birch paint job, so that's what it got on its latest refurb. Plus, it gives me a good UV blocker for the resin and since I'm getting old, if I ever decide to sell it, it would be more attractive to the reenactors this way. I've been waiting 40 years to see the bark paint, and really like finally being able to get far enough back from the boat today to really see it. The base coat is a couple of tan shades of Home Depot epoxy garage floor enamel, rolled and tipped. Then it got subtle lighter and darker areas with a spray gun. The tiny bark grain lines were rolled on. I used a piece of PVC pipe, cut strips from a vinyl floor mat to make small ridges and stuck them to the pipe. This was used to roll the lines on using dark brown garage floor enamel. This was all top-coated with a flat conversion varnish, sprayed-on to dull the surface. The big black pitch seam lines were originally done with WEST Epoxy and graphite powder, followed with a fairly hard black calk, applied with a chisel-shaped stick. They're textured above the waterline, but smooth below it. The white paint is a modern version of old fashioned milk paint and the pattern is taken from the painting on the cover of the Eric Morse book "Fur Trade Canoe Routes of Canada- Then and Now".

    Fur trade canoe gunwales were lashed-on through holes in the bark. On a stripper, all those holes would be the potential kiss of death for soaking water into the core, so the boat was built with scuppered outwales and the lacing wraps the outwales only, between the spacer blocks. It looks good - at least from the outside and without drilling all those holes in the hull. The actual gunwale fastenings are screws, countersunk and plugged. Lacing was originally snowshoe rawhide. For this incarnation I have replaced most of it with vinyl lawn chair lacing, which is less attractive to mice and chipmunks who occasionally wander into the garage at our cabin.

    Mid 1970s on a cold, early spring day.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    10,019

    Default Re: Defenestration

    That's a carefuly manicured property, never mind the canoe!

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