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Thread: A Timber Frame Boatshop

  1. #106
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    Oct 2009
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    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
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    15,484

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Awesome work...I would love to build something where the structure is as cool as the boats inside. A friend of mine out on the Key Peninsula in Puget Sound built a beautiful shop with a similar frame structure and utilized large single pane reclaimed windows from the University of Puget Sound as most of the wall material. Great job! Thanks for posting.
    Your friend named Tom?

  2. #107
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    Oct 2014
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    SW Washington/ At Sea
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    167

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Yes indeed. I haven't seen him in several years, as I've moved down to the Columbia River. He is an amazing craftsman.

  3. #108
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    Mar 2002
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    Atlanta
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    2,336

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Concrete work is hard work . Congratulations on the hand poured foundation . I've had to do some of that myself .

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Siding continues. Starting with all live-edge flitches means a lot of resawing with the worm-drive. Happily, having the ceiling planks random-width means only the bark edges are really waste. Skinny stuff becomes battens, bigger boards becoming siding or roofing.







    Peter getting a nice scribed fit on the joint.




    Getting a bit of a haircut



    All trimmed up, with battens and tar paper installed. Finally a dry place to work!


  5. #110
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    May 2012
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    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    A wonderful place to build... Looking fantastic. Forgive me if you covered this, but what are you doing for the shop floor?

  6. #111
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    Mar 2011
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I've been vacillating about the floor. The original plan was just a dirt floor, to be kind to the boats therein. I am now considering using the last of my lumber stash, on sleepers, to give a drier place for the power tools. This would be built over a vapor barrier but rest on the (levelled) ground. The big bay would remain dirt, but the rest of the structure would have a wood floor, which is pleasant.

    I need to maintain the ability for heavy trailers to go in and out of the main bay, and I am very against concrete as a work surface.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Lynden, Wa
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    A wood work floor is a wonderful thing. I think a wood floor under the shed roof with the rest being dirt makes a ton of sense.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  8. #113
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    Mar 2011
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    A couple of dinosaurs watching the paint go on.



    Always fighting the rain, trying to paint in December.



    Time to build some doors.




    I settled on a herringbone pattern for the doors, as its self-bracing. Each plank edge was bevelled by 10 degrees for drainage and fit tight to its neighbor. I had just enough cedar to do the big doors, from another blowdown tree. The small door is salvaged doug fir T&G flooring from an old house.





    Effort was put into getting the peaks on the herringbone pattern to align when the doors were closed. It came out pretty well. You can also see the roofing here, I went with metal roofing, which is slicker than snot in the rain. The trick to landing unexpectedly in the garden is to avoid the metal stakes holding up the raspberries. A rope proved to be a good idea after all... Gutters are galvanized, and I think they complement the building well.

    One window framed and caulked in. I had to redo all the putty and generally restore these windows after their extended stay in a friend's compost pile. This turned out to be more difficult than expected, I'll not be a window glazer any time soon.


  9. #114
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    Jan 2008
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    Lynden, Wa
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    3,290

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I need a boatshop. Someday I will build a great cathedral of boatbuilding.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post




    Mission Accomplished! A wonderful, impressive structure.


    Needs a sign. Madison Boat Shop
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  10. #115
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    Apr 2009
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    Mountain lakes of Vermont
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    11,557

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    It's looking grand!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  11. #116
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    Sep 2014
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    Lexington, MA
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    260

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post


    Needs a sign. Madison Boat Shop
    Get out the old oar.
    Almost everything about boats involves so much more time and money than one anticipates that rational and accurate planning will deter even starting. Ian McColgin

  12. #117
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    May 2016
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    Ottawa, Canada
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I am very against concrete as a work surface.
    Can you share why you don't like concrete ?
    You made me look up "vacillating".... lol

  13. #118
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark0 View Post
    Can you share why you don't like concrete ?
    You made me look up "vacillating".... lol
    In theory it is hydroscopic, which dries out the timbers of a boat stored on it. But mostly it's because it is so hard to stand on all day, is difficult to nail or brace jigs to, has a large environmental impact, destroys your tools when you drop them, lacks soul, and because I would have to haul all that material in by hand again and I'm tired!

  14. #119
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    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    71

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Looks great! When is the Maid moving in?

  15. #120
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    May 2016
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    Ottawa, Canada
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    210

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Those seem like good reasons. Yes, hard surfaces are tough without good footwear or anti fatigue mats (I have one in front of the wood lathe). The upside to a solid floor is how easy it is to clean.

  16. #121
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    May 2012
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    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
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    4,609

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    It's a goddam palace!

    Are you looking for a tenant?

    Re floor; machines like to be bolted to a solid concrete surface. I tried bolting a lathe to a wooden floor once, it didn't go well. Maybe wood over concrete?

  17. #122
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    Feb 2016
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    Sea, WA, King
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    78

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Very cool...would love to visit!

    WgMkr

  18. #123
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    May 2005
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    Whidbey Island , Wa.
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    In theory it is hydroscopic, which dries out the timbers of a boat stored on it. But mostly it's because it is so hard to stand on all day, is difficult to nail or brace jigs to, has a large environmental impact, destroys your tools when you drop them, lacks soul, and because I would have to haul all that material in by hand again and I'm tired!
    Concrete Line pump or vertical concrete pump trucks save tons of labor.

    In your case keeping the dirt floor where the boat is parked and using a wood floor in your machine space could work. It creates height issues , and or venting issues for the wood framed floor portion of the space that will take some creative thought to work out.

    I remodeled a house years ago in Coupevill the former own had build a wooded boat in the barn / shop so it had a wood floor framed in part of it and the rest was dirt.
    Critters found easy access to get under the wood floor , some of the wood floor had rotted, is was hard to run wiring under the not very accessible wood floor system , we did some work in the barn a art studio room IIRC , so we framed walls and had to remove equipment and re wire the new walls , the wood floor idea Roger Owner had used worked for him while he built his boat , but was problematic for the second owner.
    In your case that my be the same situation, other than allowing rot to get to your timber frame , maybe you can live with the long term
    down sides the wood floor will create.

  19. #124
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    Mar 2011
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post

    Re floor; machines like to be bolted to a solid concrete surface. I tried bolting a lathe to a wooden floor once, it didn't go well. Maybe wood over concrete?
    You must have bigger machines than I do. None of mine are bolted to anything, haven't noticed an issue. I don't have a mill or metal working lathe, not yet anyhow...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wagemaker View Post
    Very cool...would love to visit!

    WgMkr
    Sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Girouard View Post
    Concrete Line pump or vertical concrete pump trucks save tons of labor.

    In your case keeping the dirt floor where the boat is parked and using a wood floor in your machine space could work. It creates height issues , and or venting issues for the wood framed floor portion of the space that will take some creative thought to work out.

    I remodeled a house years ago in Coupevill the former own had build a wooded boat in the barn / shop so it had a wood floor framed in part of it and the rest was dirt.
    Critters found easy access to get under the wood floor , some of the wood floor had rotted, is was hard to run wiring under the not very accessible wood floor system , we did some work in the barn a art studio room IIRC , so we framed walls and had to remove equipment and re wire the new walls , the wood floor idea Roger Owner had used worked for him while he built his boat , but was problematic for the second owner.
    In your case that my be the same situation, other than allowing rot to get to your timber frame , maybe you can live with the long term
    down sides the wood floor will create.
    I think I can make it work. Wiring will be kept above the floor, it's not like its easy to add wire under a concrete floor either. If there are issues with rot eventually, it will not be in contact with the frame, so issues would be isolated to the floor. They can always pull it out and sell it to hipsters as "rustic" lumber and be back where we're at today.

  20. #125
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    May 2005
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    Whidbey Island , Wa.
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    You must have bigger machines than I do. None of mine are bolted to anything, haven't noticed an issue. I don't have a mill or metal working lathe, not yet anyhow...



    Sure.



    I think I can make it work. Wiring will be kept above the floor, it's not like its easy to add wire under a concrete floor either. If there are issues with rot eventually, it will not be in contact with the frame, so issues would be isolated to the floor. They can always pull it out and sell it to hipsters as "rustic" lumber and be back where we're at today.



    We where re-wiring for a different use of the space, but trapped floor joist aren’t easy to deal with. I understand your reasoning , it’s your space, so if it meets your desires and it outlasts you in your intended use it’s all good!

    And IF I remember right , you mentioned the sprawl in your area, mentioning you hoped the single family dwelling of your lot would survive. I could have that wrong , but I think you’re the guy who mentioned it.

    It will be a fine back yard space for you , a pleasure to go work in , or just hang out in at times. I fully understand your desire for “shop space”.
    I’m quite happy in mine , with a concrete floor, but I have no desire to build the type of boat that would benefit from a dirt floor , nor do I desire to clean a dirt floor. I do plenty of that type “cleaning” on my jobsites.

    It’s a nice building and I think you’re going to enjoy your time in that space , even when you decide to pour a concrete floor so your shop is better set up to build stuff for your house than boats.

  21. #126
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Montana USA
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    133

    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    In theory it is hydroscopic, which dries out the timbers of a boat stored on it. But mostly it's because it is so hard to stand on all day, is difficult to nail or brace jigs to, has a large environmental impact, destroys your tools when you drop them, lacks soul, and because I would have to haul all that material in by hand again and I'm tired!

    I agree with you about a wood floor. I've worked in several boat shops on both coasts and Alaska and the one shop with a concrete floor was the hardest on just about everything - feet, tools, fastening something to the floor. My own shop has a wooden floor and I can screw it, nail it and easily clean it...

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