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Thread: A Timber Frame Boatshop

  1. #71
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Awesome! Such a great building will inspire many a great boats!

    WgMkr

  2. #72
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Kalshoven View Post
    How goes the build, Mr. Madison?
    Its going, the 3rd (final) truss has been erected. So the frame just needs two good weekends and it would be ready for sheathing.

    But I've been awfully distracted working on actual boats lately. Summer needs to be twice as long...

  3. #73
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    So somehow it only just clicked with me that this boatshop is for the Maid in the Building The Maid thread. Nice to revisit that thread with all the photos back.
    I’ve done some timber framing and it really is a fun way to build.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    The frame is complete. The city came to inspect it, got very confused, and went away mumbling. I'll take it.

    Cutting the kingpost and tie beam



    Hoist it up...



    All set.



    Summer came and went. There was lots of sailing and boat work, and a little bit of framing. But when the weather started to turn I realised I'd better get a roof on this thing before winter is here.

    One of the last jobs was putting the mid-wall plates. They are quite oversized, like everything else. Their only job is the keep the siding from pumping in a wind.



    Last beam.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    The final jobs were to add some light stick framing for the windows and door. I didn't use heavy timbers here in case I decide to re-purpose the building some day. I didn't want to be locked into a window configuration.

    Metal strapping was added for earthquake codes. The building doesn't need it, and I was a little bitter about having to put it on, but it will all be covered with the siding.

    Locust pegs were driven into each joint to lock the structure in place.








  6. #76
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Looks great! A question on the pegs: Are the M&T joints draw bored?

  7. #77
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Not draw bored, just drilled straight through. I used ratchet straps to pull everything very tight before drilling and driving the pegs.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Got it - thanks Jonathan.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Why does your timber frame structure not need (only require) foundation strapping?

    Jeff

  10. #80
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Modern standards would say that the structure needs all of the strapping. Traditionally it would have had none. The posts would have been scribed to sit on a big rock, or a stone pier. The truss would be pegged to the posts, that was it. Many of those structures survived for centuries. Some also probably fell over during earthquakes.

    The foundation straps don't bother me, its the upper strapping on the trusses that is redundant. Its a concession to modern life, no big deal.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    After Hurricane Ike destroyed Galveston in 2008, some Amish were brought in to rebuild with timber framed houses. Their construction methods far exceeded building codes. I stick built a 16x19 boat shop last winter due to time constraints but really wanted to do a timber frame. I'll settle for a timber framing a wood shed next summer.


  12. #82
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    Modern standards would say that the structure needs all of the strapping. Traditionally it would have had none. The posts would have been scribed to sit on a big rock, or a stone pier. The truss would be pegged to the posts, that was it. Many of those structures survived for centuries. Some also probably fell over during earthquakes.

    The foundation straps don't bother me, its the upper strapping on the trusses that is redundant. Its a concession to modern life, no big deal.
    My dad took down a number of 200 YO barns that were being "replaced" by shopping malls. This was in CT, so the frames were all oak & peg fastened. There was one he took down (I was about 7 or 8 at the time) that had to be brought down in a hurry so there was no time to drill the pegs & such. He simply cut all the knee braces & pulled it over from the top of an end bent. Doing so required a lot of pull - even on a 3 story barn.

    As I remember, all but one of the beams broke near the joint, not at it. As a kid I was sure that it'd just snap the tenon off - but nope.

    Requiring metal straps on the frame joints shows a complete lack of understanding of wood & carpentry. I get the foundation straps - but all the metal will do is make the frame last a shorter time. Please do all you can to keep the wood dry around those straps!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  13. #83
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    you had the inspection already.. why not just pull them off at this point ?

  14. #84
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Looking good!
    Timber framed structures performed very well in the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes, but a lot of pre 1950's houses jumped right off their foundations, as either the building code back then didn't require any strapping, or it was poorly enforced. To put it in context though, there were a couple of the quakes that produced vertical ground accelerations in excess of negative 1g, which had all sorts of things jumping in unexpected ways.
    Inspectors will always default to belts n braces, when confronted with things outside of their usual experience.

    Pete
    Don't underestimate the power of stupid people in large numbers!

  15. #85
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    How am I just discovering this thread now?? Great stuff. Keep it up, and I look forward to seeing the Maid resume too!!

  16. #86
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Siding has begun. My parents brought up a full trailer load of the siding stock that has been stashed away drying for years.

    The stock is all flitch sawn, widths were laid out to best advantage and cut with a worm drive saw. Siding is 10", all offcuts go in the roof, which is random widths.

    Some beautiful big stock:





    A couple friends came by to do the actual work, while I drink coffee and supervise.





    I wouldn't want to think what all this would have cost me from a lumberyard. All the siding, like the rest of the structure, is salvaged blowdown timber we had milled up.



    We left a couple of full 22" wide boards in the ceiling, to encourage the condo developers to salvage the timber when they tear it down in a few years.


  17. #87
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop





    I've got some old leaded glass windows that will fit the structure nicely.




  18. #88
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Looking good! Why the space between the boards?

  19. #89
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    My neighbor had a 24'x36' timber framed barn put up this summer. Fascinating to watch all the notches, etc. being cut and the whole thing held together with wooden pegs.
    Wish I could have one!!!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    My neighbor had a 24'x36' timber framed barn put up this summer. Fascinating to watch all the notches, etc. being cut and the whole thing held together with wooden pegs.
    Wish I could have one!!!
    You should build one. Having done a P&B framed house myself - I know you have the skills. Building something you know can last 200+ years is a great feeling.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  21. #91
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by alemon View Post
    Looking good! Why the space between the boards?
    That's pretty normal with board and batten, it gives the boards plenty of room to move with the seasons and helps the material spread a bit further. Note the battens have not been installed yet.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    very cool, i'll have to look this up. i know nothing about it but i think this looks amazing.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    REALLY ENJOYING THIS BUILD !!!

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  24. #94
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Where's the wrb (water resistive barrier)? And how are you going to flash the windows & doors?

    Jeff

  25. #95
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I can see how board and batten (BnB) siding is attractive as infill on your building. However, I am not sure how long-lasting this form of siding is in our wet-coast climate. I obtained a lot of really good cedar boards from the debris pile of a BnB residing project. The boards were really good, except for the bottom foot that was completely rotted out. Horizontal lapped siding holds up much better. The boards I salvaged from the neighbour's conversion from lapped cedar to vinyl were all in excellent condition. Similar age, maybe older, same climate.

    However, if you can put up with only a 20-25 year lifespan, it should be fine.

  26. #96
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Where's the wrb (water resistive barrier)? And how are you going to flash the windows & doors?

    Jeff
    You mean the plastic wrap? Would you have me look at that on the outside or inside of the building? Surely you wouldn't have me skin it with plywood first and have to look at that while I build boats? This is to be my escape from that kind of world.

    No ply, no plastic. A guy's got to draw a line somewhere. Its a barn, built like a barn. The windows and doors do get flashing, mostly to create a drip edge.

    The furring strips behind the siding have a bevelled top, to drain any potential moisture out away from the frame. The skin is replacable, the frame is permanent. The bottom of the siding is bevelled as a drip edge, to prevent water from sitting on the end grain, and will be well sealed with paint. Barns in the area built this way are still standing 100 years later. I doubt there is that much time left before the whole neighborhood becomes condos.
    Last edited by J.Madison; 11-01-2018 at 04:43 PM.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Sorry. I assumed that you would be insulating and heating this structure. I'm a good few years older than you and appreciate a warm and dry working environment. So my thoughts always lead that way. Obviously, your needs vary from mine. Carry on.

    I do like that you are utilizing blown downs from family property. I had some timber sawn from my own trees that had to be taken down due to damage. Unfortunately I made the mistake of stacking some boards infested with carpenter ants in with the good stuff. The ants opened subdivisions in a lot of places. Looks like you avoided that problem.

    Jeff

  28. #98
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Sorry. I assumed that you would be insulating and heating this structure. I'm a good few years older than you and appreciate a warm and dry working environment. So my thoughts always lead that way. Obviously, your needs vary from mine. Carry on.

    I do like that you are utilizing blown downs from family property. I had some timber sawn from my own trees that had to be taken down due to damage. Unfortunately I made the mistake of stacking some boards infested with carpenter ants in with the good stuff. The ants opened subdivisions in a lot of places. Looks like you avoided that problem.

    Jeff
    Only thing worse than carpenter ants getting into a woodpile is powder post beetles.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  29. #99
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I haven't had many bug problems, I did spray the piles with a termite poison of some sort. The fir seems to do better than cedar in that regard.

    No heat or insulation in this structure. No floor either, until I get around to it. We'll see how many winters that takes to motivate me. A wood stove installation could be in the future as well, just to clean up the offcuts.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by robm View Post
    I can see how board and batten (BnB) siding is attractive as infill on your building. However, I am not sure how long-lasting this form of siding is in our wet-coast climate. I obtained a lot of really good cedar boards from the debris pile of a BnB residing project. The boards were really good, except for the bottom foot that was completely rotted out. Horizontal lapped siding holds up much better. The boards I salvaged from the neighbour's conversion from lapped cedar to vinyl were all in excellent condition. Similar age, maybe older, same climate.

    However, if you can put up with only a 20-25 year lifespan, it should be fine.
    I built my house 32 years ago. Second growth doug fir that grew on the property. No sign of bugs or rot. I spray the bottom 3 feet with various stuff occasionally and sprinkle diatomaceous earth around the perimeter in the spring.
    This is in Gig Harbor,about 60 miles south.


  31. #101
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Maybe I missed it earlier in the thread somewhere, but do you have enough beef in the roof joist to attach a hoist, should you need it?
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  32. #102
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I built my house 32 years ago. Second growth doug fir that grew on the property. No sign of bugs or rot. I spray the bottom 3 feet with various stuff occasionally and sprinkle diatomaceous earth around the perimeter in the spring.
    This is in Gig Harbor,about 60 miles south.
    Good news!

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Maybe I missed it earlier in the thread somewhere, but do you have enough beef in the roof joist to attach a hoist, should you need it?
    Yes, it's got mega-beef. I also installed a rebar loop in the very back of the foundation, so I can drag thing off of trailers with a winch if necessary.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I've seen 100+ YO B&B in great shape - coastal CT.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  34. #104
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I would suggest putting in a floor right away. Once you get stuff moved in it will be *impossible* later. We didn't paint our shop floor right away, and in hindsight we should have...

    Looking great !
    Mark

  35. #105
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Awesome work...I would love to build something where the structure is as cool as the boats inside. A friend of mine out on the Key Peninsula in Puget Sound built a beautiful shop with a similar frame structure and utilized large single pane reclaimed windows from the University of Puget Sound as most of the wall material. Great job! Thanks for posting.

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