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Thread: A Timber Frame Boatshop

  1. #36
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    J P, why would you run the braces the other way? Just aesthetics?
    Just to have the braces in compression rather than tension (presuming the doors are hinged and not sliders).

    No roof overhangs planned for this building?

  2. #37
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    How is electrical inspection handled in your community? Here, the city inspects everything but electric so the state is the local jurisdiction. They are actually easier to work with than the city. I had to bond the foundation rebar to the grounding system. Easy to do before placing concrete.

    Jeff

  3. #38
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    [QUOTE=J.Madison;

    I gather not everywhere is as strict with building codes. For this little unheated "garage" I've already had two site inspections from the city, with drawings in hand, and several more scheduled.[/QUOTE]

    NJ might have you beat for permits, that's where we just moved from. Here in Downeast Maine, we just had a 1900 farmhouse completely gutted and rebuilt, only had one inspection (plumbing) for the whole job!
    Steve B
    Sjogin IIIa
    PAYTON 13' Pea Pod

    RIVUS 16' Melonseed


    "If a man must be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most." E. B. White

  4. #39
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    The permit/inspection process varies depending on whether the project is new construction or a "remodel"

    Looking forward to seeing the "Maid" build thread started up
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  5. #40
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Congratulations, it will be a very fine boatyard.
    I do wonder why you did not hydroproofed the foundation? Sill gaskets are mandatory in this case to break the capillary action of the concrete, otherwise the wood will rott. After seeing your construction photos I would expect to see you install some drainage system, at least some exterior French drain.
    As for later insulation or even converting to human habitation that is something I would forget if I were you. Successfully isolating this type of traditional construction to modern standards is very expensive if not planed for and done from the beginning. SIP's are not the answer to this if the building is to last a while at least. If it gets to cold inside just hang some plastic sheets from the rafters around the boat and use an electric oil radiator.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Well I have finally faced this thread again after the boto-phuket disaster and replaced all the images.

    We left off with the foundation poured. I wimped out and rented a bobcat for backfilling the foundation.



    I did install drainage around the two high sides of the shop, leading to a french drain.



    Ready to get building!



    I didn't take many photos after that, but the wood was hauled north and the beamery set up. Here we are test fitting a king post to its tie beam.



    I set up a gin pole to do the heavy lifting. Here the first set of posts are standing, ready for the tie beam.





  7. #42
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Of course it was dark by the time we got the tie beam up. 400 lbs, not much for a winch but still felt pretty scary as it went up.





    That 10 ft clearance under the tie beam is going to be nice!




  8. #43
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    WOW! nice framing. Stout.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  9. #44
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Just judging from the opening photo, on this thread, that shows your drafting table gives me great feelings of expectation as to the beautiful boats you will create!
    Did you make those spline weights? Your shop construction makes me want to grab my broad axe and adze and help out!
    Jay

  10. #45
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Broad axes and adzes welcome any time! I did cast the spline weights, very rough lead castings.

    I have 30 years worth of boat builds already queued up, two of which have preliminary half models on that table... This shop is only big enough for the first few in line though.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Well, in my humble opinion, you are going about things in a proper manner! Thanks for inspiring us all! Have polar planimeter will travel.
    Jay

  12. #47
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    It's going to be a beautiful building. Great to see you back.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Framing continues, slowly due to the early darkness and rain. I'm not afraid of rain, but my tools are.



    A lean-to rafter.



    And the post it lands on.



    I love the colors that come from the butt end of a doug fir log. Shown here prepping a dovetail notch.

    It was all brought snug with a spanish windlass.



    These angles were quite complex, so I used a 2x6 as a template which worked well.




  14. #49
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    The beam pile is getting smaller.


    The first posts for Bent #2 have started.




  15. #50
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Just came across this thread. That's going to be a great shed! I'm envious. We don't even have enough yard for a tool shed. But I have to ask... what techniques are you using to cut the mortises, tenons, dovetails &c.? Is that all being done by hand? I would sure like mine to look like that. Yeah, I know - how do you get to Carnegie Hall and all that - but the more questions I ask the more likely it will be that at some point in the future I will become a somewhat competent woodworker.

    Thanks,

  16. #51
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I'll try to get some pics of the process this weekend if the rain slows down.

    Generally I make any straight cuts with a circle saw for tenon sides and similar parts. Mortices have most of the waste hogged out with a drill. All parts are finished with hand tools, planes and chisels mostly.

    Most cuts are too deep for the skil saw, so they are finished with the hand saw. The other useful tools are an electric chainsaw to really lop off the waste and an electric plane. Neither are needed, but they replace a lot of sweat.

    The only specialty tool is a proper framing chisel. The one I have is only 1.5" but very heavy with a blade over a foot long. With a big mallet it will really move material and is the primary workhorse.

    Dovetail shoulders are cut with a hand joinery saw because I want them accurate. Then I hog out as much waste as I dare with the drill or saw and start chopping with the chisel.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Having worked in an unheated, uninsulated shop, I would advise you to carefully consider the alternatives. When the temperature dips below 50, it is difficult for me to comfortably work. Boat work is slow and painstaking. I did put an airtight stove in the corner of that shop so that I could retire and get momentarily warm. Pretty miserable otherwise.

    Love the timber framing!
    Last edited by pcford; 11-17-2017 at 10:06 AM.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    These kinds of permitting requirements have soured me to ever wanting to build anything ever again.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Nice one. A friend of mine had no end of problems putting up one of these in New Zealand, apparently they had no data on wooden joints and took a lot of convincing, and paperwork to back the design up. How are your neighbours?

  20. #55
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I'll try to get some pics of the process this weekend if the rain slows down.

    Generally I make any straight cuts with a circle saw for tenon sides and similar parts. Mortices have most of the waste hogged out with a drill. All parts are finished with hand tools, planes and chisels mostly.

    Most cuts are too deep for the skil saw, so they are finished with the hand saw. The other useful tools are an electric chainsaw to really lop off the waste and an electric plane. Neither are needed, but they replace a lot of sweat.

    The only specialty tool is a proper framing chisel. The one I have is only 1.5" but very heavy with a blade over a foot long. With a big mallet it will really move material and is the primary workhorse.

    Dovetail shoulders are cut with a hand joinery saw because I want them accurate. Then I hog out as much waste as I dare with the drill or saw and start chopping with the chisel.
    Thanks. That's going to be a beautiful building. Shed seems too pedestrian a name for it. And I like your description of a cathedral to boat building, with your view across an island orchard to the salish sea. That's pretty much my idea of paradise right there.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    A joint from beginning to end:

    Layout first, try to set up the beam such that no major joinery passes through a knot. Waste is then hogged out with a forstner bit, or auger for deeper work.



    Knock out the waste between holes with the chisel and start to form up the edges of the mortise.




    It is very important that the mortise is not narrower at the bottom than the top. I aim for just a hair undercut, so nothing binds as it goes in. Check often with the square, set to the right depth, as the shape nears completion.




    And slide the brace into its home for a test fit. I test fit as many joints as possible, as they often can be improved with a few more shavings taken off somewhere.




  22. #57
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Now to make more braces. I plane everything down so the building inspector thinks that I bought it at home depot.



    After the layout, I cut all the part-offs as deep as the saw will go and then all of the partial depth cuts as well. Then I separate everything with the handsaw.



    Everywhere the power saw isn't deep enough is finished by hand.



    A bit of tuning with the chisel, plane, and it is good to go.


  23. #58
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    We always seem to be working in the dark.



    Offcuts make good firewood.



    Consultation about tuning up some of the joinery.



    A tarp shanty was built to keep some of the beams dry. I'm sure the neighbors love it.



    Heave Ho. The big tie beams are hoisted with a winch on the gin pole, but the lighter stuff is easier to do by hand. Especially if you can convince coworkers to come help.



    Getting close!



    And.... apparently we didn't get a shot of it all together.

  24. #59
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Awesome work, John!

    I'm not clear on what the posts are landing on. It kind of looks like a thick rubber or plastic pad.
    What will constrain the lateral movement at the base? I see some vertical galvanized straps but will they be permanent?
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  25. #60
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    The vertical straps are foundation tie downs and are permanent. These resist uplift and the post sliding. The posts have 1" starboard pinned onto the bottom to keep the post up off of the concrete. The center post has a more traditional post base fitting.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    The vertical straps are foundation tie downs and are permanent. These resist uplift and the post sliding. The posts have 1" starboard pinned onto the bottom to keep the post up off of the concrete. The center post has a more traditional post base fitting.
    Thanks for the clarification.

    The star board must be the modern version of something I saw in a 1000 year old wood temple in Japan many years ago. All the posts were set on a round stone that had been dressed to have a knob in the centre that a corresponding hole in the post base fit onto. The rest of the stone had a slight slope on it to drain water away. Prevented rot.
    Alex

    "“He was unfamiliar with the sea and did not like it much: it was a place that made you cold and wet and sick” " Nevil Shute, Trustee From the Toolroom

  27. #62
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    We finally got smart and started using the extension ladder as a gin pole. It is so much easier to move around than the massive timber post.





    Because the center post is the most highly loaded in the structure, it gets an extra corbel to transfer the load from the shed rafter.



    The corbel is mortised into the rafter.






  28. #63
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop


  29. #64
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Very cool project!

  30. #65
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Beautiful work. I am gob smacked to see such timber in long lengths and massive dimensions. No such thing exists west oz, and if it did only a very very very rich person could afford it. The other side of the world must be another planet entirely I'm sure. Looking forward to seeing your continued progress.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock View Post
    Beautiful work. I am gob smacked to see such timber in long lengths and massive dimensions. No such thing exists west oz, and if it did only a very very very rich person could afford it. The other side of the world must be another planet entirely I'm sure. Looking forward to seeing your continued progress.
    While it's not cheaper than stick-built, it's still pretty common in the US. When combined with SIPs a timber frame home can be built just about as quickly as well.

    My state - while a pretty rural one - is 80% forested & many others are similar. As an example, I can buy green hemlock or spruce 8'x8' x 16' (roughly 200x200mm x a bit less than 5 meters) beams @ 28 cents/board foot = about $25US for the timber. Being on the west coast - this project is made of entirely different woods though.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  32. #67
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    It does not seem to be as quick as stick built for me! But that is okay, it is something I wanted to try, and probably not the only structure like this I will build in my life.

    The timbers were all grown "wild" on my parents property, and were blown over in a storm. So no cost, other than getting them milled to my specs.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    I imagine your parents property is big to have so many trees? The milled timbers look really nice, love that colouring and grain.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    Now to make more braces. I plane everything down so the building inspector thinks that I bought it at home depot.
    Good call, I've heard that inspectors like stamps on lumber and they don't have the authority to grade lumber themselves. If they believe it's from a commercial outlet, no need to crush their dreams.

    Looks like a fun project !

    Mark

  35. #70
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    Default Re: A Timber Frame Boatshop

    How goes the build, Mr. Madison?
    "I'm built for comfort, ain't built for speed." - Willie Dixon

    "I refuse to grow up, as I believe that it’s not mandatory." - Chuck "Paladin" Phillips

    “Telecaster: Most basic kick-ass electric guitar ever made. (I should place IMHO right about here, but it's a natural and universal truth.)” -Tweed's Blues

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